Which hub should I buy?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: stoom's Avatar
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    Which hub should I buy?

    Okay, here's my specs:

    Jericho Leadfoot
    XTR 952 BB (112.5)
    XTR cranks
    34t Jericho Suffering

    I am currently using a really tired wheel off of my old specialized. I have a 17t CK cog and a bunch of spacers.

    I am either going to build up a CK classic hub or a CK SS hub.

    ????????
    Does anyone else have a similar application?
    Does anyone use a CK SS hub? What are your thoughts?

    I know that if I get the classic hub that I will not have any troubles with the chain line. But if I get the SS hub I don't know.

    With the SS hub, is there only one spot for the cog? Does that make sense?

    Thanks,
    Stoom

  2. #2
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
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    I've got a CK SS hub. It features a "mini" freehub that allows quite a bit of lateral room for cog placement. You shouldn't have any problems achieving proper chainline with a CK SS hub.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoom
    Okay, here's my specs:

    Jericho Leadfoot
    XTR 952 BB (112.5)
    XTR cranks
    34t Jericho Suffering

    I am currently using a really tired wheel off of my old specialized. I have a 17t CK cog and a bunch of spacers.

    I am either going to build up a CK classic hub or a CK SS hub.

    ????????
    Does anyone else have a similar application?
    Does anyone use a CK SS hub? What are your thoughts?

    I know that if I get the classic hub that I will not have any troubles with the chain line. But if I get the SS hub I don't know.

    With the SS hub, is there only one spot for the cog? Does that make sense?

    Thanks,
    Stoom
    The idea behind the SS version of the CK hub is that it is identical to the 9 speed version except that the freehub casing is shorter, allowing for the hub body to be wider and therefore can be build without having to dish the drive side. This creates a stronger wheel and looks better than 8 or 9 spacers versus the two spacers on the SS version. There is room on the SS version for 2 cogs, but if you did so, you would have an improper chainline. I have been on my CK for about a year and a half now and have done no maintenance to it whatsoever and have never had an issue. It works, and it works well!

    --Billy


    A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.
    - Douglas Adams

  4. #4
    Jed Peters
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    Chris King SS.

    Your Jericho just wouldn't ride the same without one. LOL.

  5. #5
    cut like the fog.
    Reputation: bones's Avatar
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    bling!

    With specs like that son, you have to get a King SS hub.

    b. (love my king's)


  6. #6
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Billy
    I have been on my CK for about a year and a half now and have done no maintenance to it whatsoever and have never had an issue. It works, and it works well!
    Mine are about 8 months old and I've had issues, but I'm not in the perennially sunny state like most of you guys. Apparently cold sometimes screws with the ringdrive engagement. Also, how often do you guys have to adjust the preload on the bearings? Mine seem to come loose now and then.

    Frustration with the Ringdrive has led me to this.

  7. #7
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
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    cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    Mine are about 8 months old and I've had issues, but I'm not in the perennially sunny state like most of you guys. Apparently cold sometimes screws with the ringdrive engagement. Also, how often do you guys have to adjust the preload on the bearings? Mine seem to come loose now and then.

    Frustration with the Ringdrive has led me to this.
    that fixed gear thing looks cool ricky.
    Only boring people get bored.

  8. #8
    SS Grrrrrrrl
    Reputation: dirtcrab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    Mine are about 8 months old and I've had issues, but I'm not in the perennially sunny state like most of you guys. Apparently cold sometimes screws with the ringdrive engagement. Also, how often do you guys have to adjust the preload on the bearings? Mine seem to come loose now and then.

    Frustration with the Ringdrive has led me to this.
    I own one set of ISO Disc (F/R), one set of Universal Disc (F/R) and on my SS I have the ISO Disc front and the SS Disc rear. No one beats the quality of Chris King and as long as I can afford them *grin*, they go on every mountain bike I own.

    I was a little concerned when I first pulled the SS hub out of the box, as it comes with two identical sized spacers... After I had everything mounted the chain line matched up perfectly (using Truvativ SS Stylo and Truvativ BB). There is enough space left when tightening down the cassette ring that one could add some small spacers if minimal chainline correction was needed. So you have nothing to fear in that department if you go with the SS specific hub.

    There are some minor differences with the construction of the SS hub compared to the standard rear. Most notably, the adjusting cone is locked into place with it's own pinch bolt and can actually be adjusted while the wheel is mounted on the bike. When I first received mine, there was some minor play in the rear hub. With the Disc version, you have to remove the disc adapter to get to the pinch bolt, not really a big deal, but it should be mentioned so that you remember to mount the wheel in the bike and make any adjustments prior to mounting the adapter and rotor.


    Drevil,

    King recommends that if the hubs are being run in cold weather, that 5 to 10 drops of TriFlo or 10W synthetic oil be mixed with the grease in the ring drive. If you ride in sub zero you should run it with straight 10W synthetic oil. The only downside I know of to this is that the hub will be slightly louder, but it should fix your ring drive engagement problems.

    Another thing to consider with your CK hubs (directly from the CK website) - double check your hub Build Level Version and contact them for an upgrade if necessary:

    A Note on Lubricants and Build Level Versions:
    Rear hub versions 310 though 313 were originally designed to run on 20w non detergent or, preferably, 20w synthetic oil. This lubrication method works well, however, starting at version 314, we improved the system by converting it to run on a special grease. The special grease improved the cold weather performance, back pedal drag while freewheeling, and coasting speed. Sound deadening has benefited also. Do not attempt to run versions earlier than 314 on grease. This could cause sluggish movement of the drive ring leading to engagement problems. These earlier hubs may be upgraded at no cost to run on our special grease. This upgrade includes our new stainless steel needle bearing as well.

    The Hub Upgrade Program:
    Due to experience gained from riders and racers in the field our hubs have undergone several minor revisions that have continued to improve their performance. Each notable improvement is referred to as a new build level. The build level, or version, is designated by the first three numbers of the serial number (e.g., a hub with a serial number 310XXXXX is considered a version 310 hub.) Technical improvements added to each new build level are made available to all Chris King customers where ever possible.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    THANK YOU fellow 1-speeders

    With that I am going to build the SS ck.

    thanks again,

    Stoom

  10. #10
    croSSman
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    Don't forget about Phil

    The CK is a nice hub, but if you really want a wheel that is going to be very laterally stiff (no dish) yoiu might want to consider a Phil Wood hub. The high canted flange builds an ultra-strong wheel, and you can't beat the bearings - forever smooth. They aren't the lightest, but they are the most efficient. That's a bing thing to consider when you've got one gear.
    Cheers!
    Chuck Ross

  11. #11
    mr. wonderful
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    another consideration is

    . . .do you have another (gulp, geared) bike?

    i was in a similar situation and opted to build a(nother) set on king iso(s). reasons were: lighter than the universal disc SS hub, better looking (imho) than the universal disc, could sell it easier, and, most importantly, if a wheel breaks, needs service, or whatever, i am not relegated to one or the other bike. both wheels are almost identical (one has super comp spokes, the other has wheelsmith 14/15s).

    sure, i like the ck SS without so many spacers and if they made a SS iso, my decision would have been more difficult.

    anyway, as long as your hubs have the words chris king on them, you made a great choice.

    richard

  12. #12
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    I run the paul disc hub- no problems after about 2 years...its not a cog, but the hub has taken serious abuse and come back every time.

  13. #13
    SS Grrrrrrrl
    Reputation: dirtcrab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Ross
    The CK is a nice hub, but if you really want a wheel that is going to be very laterally stiff (no dish) yoiu might want to consider a Phil Wood hub. The high canted flange builds an ultra-strong wheel, and you can't beat the bearings - forever smooth. They aren't the lightest, but they are the most efficient. That's a bing thing to consider when you've got one gear.
    Cheers!
    Chuck Ross
    Just to correct the incorrect inference above: King SS rear hubs also build a dishless wheel (both the disc and non-disc version) .

    The nice thing about the kings is that they are completely servicable (if you buy the tool... which I highly recommend to anyone who likes to do their own maintenance). My friend just built up his own SS and went with the Paul Hubs.. they are nice looking and functional and they're great wheels (not that I'm knocking them) But given the choice I would rather have a servicable freewheel SS specific hub that I know is going to last for 5 - 10 years, than keep replacing a $20 freewheel that doesn't engage as nicely as a set of CK's. Just my .02 cents.

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