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  1. #1
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    Hub with adjustable chainline?

    I was looking at the IRO website and noticed on the website that their SS hub has the ability to adjust the chainline....how exactly do you adjust the chainline?

  2. #2
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    It's a cassette hub.

    The IRO hub is a cassette hub just like on a geared bike but with a shorter cassette. It needs a few narrow spacers along with the cog and you adjust the chain line by moving spacers around in relation to the cog's position on the cassette.

  3. #3
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    Rennen

    This is about as close as I've ever seen, the "Rennen Single Cog Spacer":

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/products.html

    Never tried it but it looks pretty cool.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crash
    This is about as close as I've ever seen, the "Rennen Single Cog Spacer":

    http://www.rennendesigngroup.com/products.html

    Never tried it but it looks pretty cool.
    I think you misread the question.

    The Rennen deal is pretty cool, though.
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  5. #5
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    If you want an adjustable chainline hub, you can simply use a standard cassette hub and lots of spacers
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aldone
    If you want an adjustable chainline hub, you can simply use a standard cassette hub and lots of spacers
    You can... But ones like the IRO give less wheel dish (I believe) resulting in a stronger wheel.

  7. #7
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    I like the idea of single speed cassette hubs - why should you have to replace the freewheel mechanism when the cog wears out? Unfortunately, the only hubs like this that I know of are Chris King, DT Swiss 240s, and IRO. The first two are outrageously expensive and the IRO is ridiculously heavy. I guess for now I am going to stick with my XT cassette hub...

  8. #8
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    There are a few others...

    On One/Novatec/Woodman/Bontrager design.
    Hadley
    Ringle (uses proprietary cog though)
    American Classic

  9. #9
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    WTB is comming out with one too. You'll likely need wide base cogs, if the carrier is like that of other WTB hubs.

    And the IRO is part of the On One/Novatec/Woodman/Bontrager family, like the Nashbar hub.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    WTB is comming out with one too. You'll likely need wide base cogs, if the carrier is like that of other WTB hubs.

    And the IRO is part of the On One/Novatec/Woodman/Bontrager family, like the Nashbar hub.
    The WTB is a version of the American Classic hub.

    The IRO and Bontrager are made by Formula.

    On-One, Woodman, Nashbar are Novatec.
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  11. #11
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    Shiggy's got it right!

    Basically you have the following choices:

    Formula hub, used by Bontrager and IRO = Heavy and cheap.

    Novatech hub, used by On-one(actually designed by On-One), Nashbar and Woodman: Heavy and cheap.

    King hub: Light and expensive.

    Hadley hub: Light and expensive.

    American Classic, soon to be used by WTB: Light and moderately expensive, but with a questionable track record.

    DT Swiss: Light and expensive.

    So take your pick! I currently have a Nashbar and a Woodman, both are heavy and bombproof.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    The WTB is a version of the American Classic hub.

    The IRO and Bontrager are made by Formula.

    On-One, Woodman, Nashbar are Novatec.
    Don't they share design? the Novatec and Formula Hubs, I mean. My understanding was they were the same design with different manufacturers.

    This site has a nice summary of available singlespeed hubs (cassette and not):
    http://www.singlespeed.nl/bits/naven/main.html

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrozenK
    Don't they share design? the Novatec and Formula Hubs, I mean. My understanding was they were the same design with different manufacturers.

    This site has a nice summary of available singlespeed hubs (cassette and not):
    https://www.singlespeed.nl/bits/naven/main.html
    Nope. The On-One, Planet X, Woodman, Nashbar, Novatec (the manufacturer) are all the same design and manufacturer.


    The IRO and Bontrager are made by Formula (no pic on the linked site) and are a similar but different design. Different shape between the flanges and a different rotor mount shape.


    This has been discussed before: https://forums.mtbr.com/singlespeed/ss-hub-question-149385.html
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    Basically you have the following choices:

    Formula hub, used by Bontrager and IRO = Heavy and cheap.

    Novatech hub, used by On-one(actually designed by On-One), Nashbar and Woodman: Heavy and cheap.

    King hub: Light and expensive.

    Hadley hub: Light and expensive.

    American Classic, soon to be used by WTB: Light and moderately expensive, but with a questionable track record.

    DT Swiss: Light and expensive.

    So take your pick! I currently have a Nashbar and a Woodman, both are heavy and bombproof.
    Hope also has a SS hub in the works. Should be mid-weight and mid-priced.
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  15. #15
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    OK Thanks...this discussion has led me to another question....I have my IRO hub on the way. I also have a King Kog that a friend of mine gave to me a few months ago that I haven't used yet. My question is this...I believe my King Kog is what you guys call "wide-based". The cog that is coming off the IRO hub is not a wide based....will the King Kog work on that IRO hub?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricer
    OK Thanks...this discussion has led me to another question....I have my IRO hub on the way. I also have a King Kog that a friend of mine gave to me a few months ago that I haven't used yet. My question is this...I believe my King Kog is what you guys call "wide-based". The cog that is coming off the IRO hub is not a wide based....will the King Kog work on that IRO hub?
    Yes, no problem. There should be room for 2-3 King Kogs if you wanted to do that.
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  17. #17
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    Will work fine.

    You might have to play with the widths of the spacers to account for the different widths of the cogs that you have. The threaded lock ring will probably allow you to run the King cog without any trouble at all.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Nope. The On-One, Planet X, Woodman, Nashbar, Novatec (the manufacturer) are all the same design and manufacturer.

    The IRO and Bontrager are made by Formula (no pic on the linked site) and are a similar but different design. Different shape between the flanges and a different rotor mount shape.


    This has been discussed before: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=149385
    Thank you sir, I stand corrected. Subtle yet noticeable differences.
    Last edited by FrozenK; 01-10-2006 at 03:41 PM.

  19. #19
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    How strong do you need a wheel to be?

    Quote Originally Posted by mixmasterbike
    You can... But ones like the IRO give less wheel dish (I believe) resulting in a stronger wheel.
    This is very true. But standard cassette hubs are used by... well, everybody who's NOT riding a SS on the trails. And you never hear them complain about weak rear wheels. Of course, they don't have any alternatives either.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    American Classic, soon to be used by WTB: Light and moderately expensive, but with a questionable track record.
    Can anyone elaborate on the questionable record?

    Thanks.

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