How much rest do you need between SS rides?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How much rest do you need between SS rides?

    So, I have been riding my SS fairly consistently for about a year and a half. I am in so much better shape at this point, but one thing has remained constant, I need about 4 days rest between rides. I am close to 200lbs, and run 32 x 16 on a 29'er. My rides are usually up and down with very little, if any, flat sections. I do not take it easy, and after my rides, my legs are hammered. Not as much as when I used to do a lot of weight lifting, but still pretty fatigued.

    So, do any of you guys find you need multiple days of rest? Or are most of you able to ride everyday or every other day?
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  2. #2
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    I am able to do every other day when I am in good shape. About 3 times a week.

  3. #3
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    32X16 on a 29'er

    my knees would have assploded! (i run 32X20....it's hilly where I live)

    as far as rest days - depends entirely on the ride.

    sometimes yes....sometimes no.
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    Don't know what of hills you have back there, but I run 32x21 in mountainous California and can go several times a week. Maybe gear down a bit.

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    A S.S. is all I own so I guess I look at it in a more basic way - which is how much rest do I need between rides, which really depends on the volume and intensity of each ride.

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    I ride 7 days a week, commuting and doing longer weekend rides, all of my bikes are single speeds.
    I commute on a 46x17 fixed gear bike to and from college a 16km round trip 5 days a week.
    I got to the gym 3 times a week a 10km round trip, and I do at least another 10km daily on my beater 46x19 fixed gear, getting around town running errands.
    On the weekends if I'm mountain biking its usually 40-60km on a 32x18 singlespeed MTB, if I'm riding on the road I flip my commuter to the freewheel wich gives me a 46x18 ratio, and the rides go from 100 to 130 km. Now that I'm on a college break I've been riding a bit more.
    I used to get really sore when I first started riding long distances and sometimes needed a whole week to recover, now I'm just used to it, rides are getting faster and I don't get as tired afterwards.
    Keep riding, and you'll get less and less sore after rides.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Don't know what of hills you have back there, but I run 32x21 in mountainous California and can go several times a week. Maybe gear down a bit.
    That's kinda what I was wondering, I guess I am a bit of a masher, and my legs feel the abuse. I mash on the inclines and will spin out as fast as I can on the descents. My knees never hurt, but my muscles sometimes do the day after. I have come close to cramping after really hard rides.I definitely feel it when trying to squat down the next day, sometimes two days after.

    Being new to the SS thing, and picking up cycling after many years off of running geared, I didn't know if this recovery time was normal. I cycle to stay in shape and for fun. So I guess my worry would be if I backed down on the gear, I wouldn't get the same level of workout. But maybe I need to rethink and back off a bit so I can ride more?

    I was thinking that there might be an issue of my weight. I am a thin 200lbs, so I can't really get lighter. I thought that maybe after riding for awhile, and being in better riding shape, that I would be able to go at least twice a week. But what seems to have happened is that I just push harder now than before.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM View Post
    32X16 on a 29'er

    my knees would have assploded! (i run 32X20....it's hilly where I live)

    as far as rest days - depends entirely on the ride.

    sometimes yes....sometimes no.
    Lol, well the inclines are fairly steep but not too long. Not 45 degrees or anything. I am usually past my anaerobic threshold by the time I get to the top of the inclines. I don't ride any extended climbs, just short and steep 1/4 mile climbs at most.
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  9. #9
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    My MTB rides are pretty hilly and I ride a 26x31x16. You should gear down if you have almost no flats; I know you're 200lbs but damn 29x32x16! That's steep. When I ride I tend to do 12+mi of trail plus a 12mi ride home and depending on where my start point is, between 5-12mi to trailhead. I could theoretically do this every day of my life and have a blast. Once I get my new shoes it will be happening.

  10. #10
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    Fuel.

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    Gear way down. Are you standing much?

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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    My MTB rides are pretty hilly and I ride a 26x31x16. You should gear down if you have almost no flats; I know you're 200lbs but damn 29x32x16! That's steep. When I ride I tend to do 12+mi of trail plus a 12mi ride home and depending on where my start point is, between 5-12mi to trailhead. I could theoretically do this every day of my life and have a blast. Once I get my new shoes it will be happening.
    Yeah, I guess mentally I feel like I would be taking a step backward with a less steep gearing, but at the same time I may find I can ride longer. Usually about an hour or so into the ride, and I am really starting to feel it. Currently, at least 5 of the climbs on my normal ride will push me far into anaerobic territory. 2 climbs are back to back with an equal decent in between. The last climb is towards the end, and usually takes a lot of will to push through.

    So yeah, it looks like I should try to back off the gearing a bit. I will say that I am still getting stronger, and in better shape, so these climbs are getting easier and I am getting faster. But I seem to just push harder all the while, and its hard for me to put away the "attack" mentality.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Gear way down. Are you standing much?
    I can grind some of the climbs seated about half way, then its a standing torture test. One of the climbs I have to stand immediately on most days. Sometimes I will sit down again partway through the climb if I get enough momentum. So yes, I guess I stand quite a bit.
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  14. #14
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    Yeah man, try gearing down a bit. Get your hands on an 18t and 20t. Start on the twenty. I know it feels like you're "wussing out" but your knees will thank you and spinning a higher rpm with all the strength you gained from pushing that donkey gear will flatten hills for you and with a slightly easier gear, most likely decreasing lap times. And you'll be able to ride longer and more often since you won't be spent from mashing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    I do not take it easy, ...
    Do take it easy every once in a while. You'll be able to ride more often.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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    Its he same as with ANY bike, you cant ride hard every ride. If your going all out then you need to ride easy days as well. If you cant do that on the SS then ride a geared bike or some other location you can do easy rides on.

    It also depends on how long the ride is, you said an hour into the ride your starting to feel it good, how much farter do you go?

    If it was my only bike id try a 18 over the 16. Dont try and go red as much. Its fine to ride a couple of hard rides a week, but you have to balance that out with more aerobic rides as well.

    If your hurting so bad you cant ride for 4 days...you need to back way off on those rides and work on some structure.

    Unless your also riding greared between those 4 days off, I would just sum it up with ride more not at max effort

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Yeah, I guess mentally I feel like I would be taking a step backward with a less steep gearing, but at the same time I may find I can ride longer. Usually about an hour or so into the ride, and I am really starting to feel it. Currently, at least 5 of the climbs on my normal ride will push me far into anaerobic territory. 2 climbs are back to back with an equal decent in between. The last climb is towards the end, and usually takes a lot of will to push through.

    So yeah, it looks like I should try to back off the gearing a bit. I will say that I am still getting stronger, and in better shape, so these climbs are getting easier and I am getting faster. But I seem to just push harder all the while, and its hard for me to put away the "attack" mentality.
    Just keep doing what you're doing and you'll adjust if you'd rather not gear down. No shame in gearing down, I run 32x21 and go "anaerobic" all the time ... did I mention we have mountains here.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    That's kinda what I was wondering, I guess I am a bit of a masher, and my legs feel the abuse. I mash on the inclines and will spin out as fast as I can on the descents. My knees never hurt, but my muscles sometimes do the day after. I have come close to cramping after really hard rides.I definitely feel it when trying to squat down the next day, sometimes two days after.

    Being new to the SS thing, and picking up cycling after many years off of running geared, I didn't know if this recovery time was normal. I cycle to stay in shape and for fun. So I guess my worry would be if I backed down on the gear, I wouldn't get the same level of workout. But maybe I need to rethink and back off a bit so I can ride more?

    I was thinking that there might be an issue of my weight. I am a thin 200lbs, so I can't really get lighter. I thought that maybe after riding for awhile, and being in better riding shape, that I would be able to go at least twice a week. But what seems to have happened is that I just push harder now than before.
    Its really hard to say about the gearing becauase we don't know the trails you are on. I run a 32x22 29er and still can't make every hill on my rides. I am right at 200lbs too. But if your taking 4 days to recover maybe try to do a half ride every other day and see how that feels.

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    Its my only bike right now. I can't see having another in the near future. It does seem that everybody here thinks I should go to at least a 18T in the rear. I think I will try that for a bit to see if it allows for more frequent rides. I may also just try to add in a "light" day before changing gears just to see how well my body reacts.

    I also realize that I might not be there yet in regards to fitness.

    Should I cut out the post ride recovery beer(s)?
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post


    Should I cut out the post ride recovery beer(s)?
    ?!?! That there's crazy talk.

  21. #21
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    The only time I'll run a gear that big is for a cyclocross or really flat mtb race.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    ?!?! That there's crazy talk.
    Taking things too far I guess...I was worried for a sec.
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    you are a large bike rider running a big SS gear. Not sure where you live but you couldnt pedal that gear here for very long. Gear down to the point of being able to ride atleast every other day and keep the beer flowing. Bikes, beer and the mtns have a great thing together, do not mess with the cosmic balance!
    If you do something often enough it tends to define you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by butryon View Post
    you are a large bike rider running a big SS gear. Not sure where you live but you couldnt pedal that gear here for very long. Gear down to the point of being able to ride atleast every other day and keep the beer flowing. Bikes, beer and the mtns have a great thing together, do not mess with the cosmic balance!
    If I we that big and running that gear, I'd be concerned about long term knee health too.

  25. #25
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    Since we're doing this; if I were that beast pushing that gear I wouldn't be going for mountain bike rides, I'd be going for mountain bike walks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Since we're doing this; if I were that beast pushing that gear I wouldn't be going for mountain bike rides, I'd be going for mountain bike walks.
    Lol, ok ok I get the point guys. I guess my weightlifting past makes my legs want to work in the same way (I still weight lift, but more body weight type exercises). I was always a super masher even back when I rode a geared, just my tendency I guess. I used to ride with a guy with a tyrannosaur body build who was 145lb soaking wet. I could smash him on the inclines, especially short and steep, and pull away easily in the flats, but he always had more stamina at the end and he was generally more agile with his bike. He always placed better in actual races. I guess that should tell me something.

    Definitely gonna get a 20T and 18T to play around with. My bike has track ends, so its not like I have an excuse not to try other gears... other than I am poor right now.
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    Everyday gear is 34/16, sometime 34/18.

    I commute via road, bike paths and singletrack (about 500-600ft elevation difference or so - steep, but short sprinting hills). 12 miles in the morning, 17-25 in the afternoon. Typically do another 30-40 or so on sat or sunday for fun.

    Only time I'm hurting is when I partake in too much PBR on a weeknight...

  28. #28
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    OdinOrion, I run the same gearing as you. But you are leaving a lot of info out which we need to be able to help.
    1. How long are your rides.
    2. How old are you?
    3. Are you overweight or just tall and big? (not insulting, I am shortish and weigh 200lbs, but not quite overweight)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wcsting View Post
    OdinOrion, I run the same gearing as you. But you are leaving a lot of info out which we need to be able to help.
    1. How long are your rides.
    2. How old are you?
    3. Are you overweight or just tall and big? (not insulting, I am shortish and weigh 200lbs, but not quite overweight)
    Well I stated earlier that I was a thin 200lb, I am 6'2" and do a lot of upper body training too. BMI has me rated as overweight . I could lose a pound or two of beer pudge, but I think most would consider me to be skinny, tall, lanky. Rides are about an hour long. I turned 40 this year. Is that old? I did see a gray hair the other day .
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  30. #30
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    Never knew it was possible to run 32x16 on hills. jk Thats some strong legs you possess. I also am a california resident and ride a 32x20 SS 29er. Dont have the legs yet for anything smaller yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Biker View Post
    Never knew it was possible to run 32x16 on hills. jk Thats some strong legs you possess. I also am a california resident and ride a 32x20 SS 29er. Dont have the legs yet for anything smaller yet.
    Some places have "hills", we have "mountains" ...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SS Hack View Post
    Some places have "hills", we have "mountains" ...
    Yeah, its a bit hard to compare really, one to other, unless you are familiar with the terrain on both sides. I did say hills, never considered using mountain. I'm not making any claims, it seems most run a less steep gear, and I may be running a bit too steep based on the responses.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Yeah, its a bit hard to compare really, one to other, unless you are familiar with the terrain on both sides. I did say hills, never considered using mountain. I'm not making any claims, it seems most run a less steep gear, and I may be running a bit too steep based on the responses.
    Yep, I haven't seen your trails, even through I made that stupid crack! You might take a poll on you local forum to see what others are using. Also, think about buying some cheap $3 cogs to test before you spring for a fancy cog.

  34. #34
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    OK, and how long are these rides you're doing?

    I'm doing 3 hour rides and I could easily do one every other day, but if I did a 5 or 6 hour ride with lots of climbing, I would have to train for a couple of months to get into shape and gear down to a 32/18 or 32/19 or even a 20.... I am also classified by my peers as a grinder on my SS. I have no knee issue though. And I don't like spinning...
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  35. #35
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    No matter what, if you are only doing one hour rides and need 4 days off, something is up. I don't believe that is enough to really increase your fitness. I would say you need to ride more, regardless of gearing. If what you say is correct you are only getting 2 hours a week. Once you get up to 7 hours a week I would say you are getting there. Start going every other day. Do an easier ride if you need to but get more hours in!

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    One hour ride, you should be good to go the next day. Gear down.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Lol, ok ok I get the point guys. ...
    Definitely gonna get a 20T and 18T to play around with. My bike has track ends, so its not like I have an excuse not to try other gears... other than I am poor right now.
    He gets it fellas. Let's all stop badgering him about his gear choice and wait for the report-back after he tries a few rides with the new gearing. until then, here's a mouse with a party hat:

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    He gets it fellas. Let's all stop badgering him about his gear choice and wait for the report-back after he tries a few rides with the new gearing. until then, here's a mouse with a party hat:
    I like the photo, pretty cute!

  39. #39
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    Should I cut out the post ride recovery beer(s)?[/QUOTE]

    Protein drink first then beer.

    One tooth makes a big difference, Surly cogs are cheap, start with a 17t first.

    I am in the same boat, ex-body builder. 6'1 250, need about two days between rides.

  40. #40
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    OMG 32x16 on 29" is heavy, I don't even can ride that on 26".

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    ive just been reading this thread , its a good read . I hope Odinorion gets out this week end and gets back with his report on his ride . Good luck and hope you find what your looking for .

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeeke View Post
    Its he same as with ANY bike, you cant ride hard every ride. If your going all out then you need to ride easy days as well. If you cant do that on the SS then ride a geared bike or some other location you can do easy rides on...

    Unless your also riding greared between those 4 days off, I would just sum it up with ride more not at max effort
    I agree and I think this is the problem. It's sounding like you're going out for a ride and it's an all out suffer fest. You're hammering yourself into the ground with a near race effort. Your body needs some recovery after that hard of an effort, no matter what you're doing or what you're riding.

    The gearing itself doesnt have much to do with it. If you're comfortable pushing 32x16 on your trails, then push a 32x16. Some people like to mash while others like to spin. You've got some mass to you and if you can push that gear comfortably, then by all means, go for it. I would experiment with different gears though.

    Not that it matters, but my "standard" gear is 34x18. I'll run that on most courses except for the ones with long steep climbs or those that are flat-ish to rolling. I've run 35x17 on the flat and punchy courses while I've run 32x18 on the really climby and steep courses. This coming from a guy that weighs under 170 and races the open/pro fields in regional races.

  43. #43
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    Thats a problem with singlespeeding. Its hard to get a proper recovery day.

    I ride 32x18 in the southeast (standard gear) and I can do a recovery ride at a place without a lot of climbing and ride 7 SS days a week. But I couldnt do all those rides at hilly trails back to back everyday...
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    I turned 40 this year. Is that old? I did see a gray hair the other day .
    Who are you calling old?

    I'm pretty sure I could kill myself by going all out for 15 minutes...

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  45. #45
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    Nutz to that, I run a 33x22 on my 29er out here in Colorado. Don't think my legs or lungs could take much more. It is definitley a challenge to find the right gearing for your location/trails.

  46. #46
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    Distance is 14 miles, and it usually takes about an hour. I don't have a way to track elevation changes through the ride. Running a 180mm crank if that matters . There are only a few sections that are long, gradual decents or inclines where I hit a constant, "easy" cadence for a bit. I usually spin out the other downhill sections if they are not on the immediate backside of a hard climb.

    I did get out on Wed night. I might force myself out Saturday morning just to see how it feels. That is less rest than I normally allow. When I have tried this in the past, I just didn't feel fresh, but to be honest I never really pushed it to see how much my performance suffered.

    I really do wish I had a good way tracking speed, cadence, and elevation changes and plot them against each other for everybody to see. It would be nice to put real numbers behind all this instead of a mostly subjective assessment.
    Last edited by OdinOrion; 07-13-2012 at 10:36 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Who are you calling old?

    I'm pretty sure I could kill myself by going all out for 15 minutes...
    Did I just accidentally call you old ? We all know age is a state of mind. I get around better than most who are far younger.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Did I just accidentally call you old ? We all know age is a state of mind. I get around better than most who are far younger.
    I had to try a bit to to make myself believe you did

    One of the historical figures of endurance sports in my corner of the world used to say that distance doesn't kill you: speed does. To a large extent it is true. If you pace yourself, you can keep going for hours and hours - and go again the next day.

    Speed is great fun but you cannot develop endurance by going fast all the time. To develop endurance, you need a lot of time on the move, at a pace that you can keep up for that time.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Distance is 14 miles, and it usually takes about an hour...
    14 miles per hour is no joke. On our fastest race course, which is rolling terrain and predominantly wide open, sweeping corners - I think I averaged about 15mph. I'm averaging about 12mph on the tougher race courses. A hard training ride that I do every Wednesday is ~11mph. That's roughly 15 miles with ~2000 ft of climbing.

    You're pushing too hard and that's why its taking you time to recover. You can't push 14mph through the woods every time you're out there.

  50. #50
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    14mph is way to much FWIW. Back off. and do it saturday and sunday, and change to an 18 t cog. you won't feel it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BShow View Post
    14 miles per hour is no joke. On our fastest race course, which is rolling terrain and predominantly wide open, sweeping corners - I think I averaged about 15mph. I'm averaging about 12mph on the tougher race courses. A hard training ride that I do every Wednesday is ~11mph. That's roughly 15 miles with ~2000 ft of climbing.

    You're pushing too hard and that's why its taking you time to recover. You can't push 14mph through the woods every time you're out there.
    Wow, that's a bit of an eye opener. I now ride on fairly wide open track, double track, fire road(on private land, but not my private land) nothing too technical. I started out on the SS road only for the first few months. I guess I don't have any idea. I did race geared years ago, in the early 90's, but not recently enough to have good perspective. I currently ride solo too, so there isn't anybody else there to compare. I think a lot of the discussion in this thread is continually pointing out that I am pushing too hard and using too steep of a ratio.

    I have to say again though, somehow my brain doesn't let me lay back much on the rides. Not that anybody here takes it easy when riding, but you get what I mean. I seem to just hammer myself from the time I start out to the finish. I can honestly say that I don't have much left in me at the end. I have added distance and more climbs over time, and no doubt I have become faster, but I started to think that others most likely don't ride like that. I am not sore after the rides, just fatigued for longer than expected. Strangely, this may be more of a mental challenge than anything else?
    Stuffing our faces at an ever smaller table.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by OdinOrion View Post
    Wow, that's a bit of an eye opener. I now ride on fairly wide open track, double track, fire road(on private land, but not my private land) nothing too technical. I started out on the SS road only for the first few months. I guess I don't have any idea. I did race geared years ago, in the early 90's, but not recently enough to have good perspective. I currently ride solo too, so there isn't anybody else there to compare. I think a lot of the discussion in this thread is continually pointing out that I am pushing too hard and using too steep of a ratio.

    I have to say again though, somehow my brain doesn't let me lay back much on the rides. Not that anybody here takes it easy when riding, but you get what I mean. I seem to just hammer myself from the time I start out to the finish. I can honestly say that I don't have much left in me at the end. I have added distance and more climbs over time, and no doubt I have become faster, but I started to think that others most likely don't ride like that. I am not sore after the rides, just fatigued for longer than expected. Strangely, this may be more of a mental challenge than anything else?
    You're going to burn out or even get sick.

    I ride 3-5X a week, 17-20 mile rides on whatever I decide to pull off the hook that day (cyclocross, geared MTB or SS). I can, and I have, done 4 straight consecutive days of riding SS, no problem. But not every day is hammerfest. I chill out a lot.

    Look at any race prep/training website, and most all will say you can't do that every day (unless you're on EPO). I get into that frame of mind that I want to hammer everyday - but when I do, my body just doesn't recover and then you're actually working against yourself, getting weaker. Then comes injury - and you're forced to stay off the bike.

    Recently I experienced this by going hard every day. After awhile, I felt I was getting slower. I was tired and my body ached. Every climb made me feel like getting off the bike and walking. I had to FORCE myself to take days off.

    Chill out. Who are you racing against? I would suggest you race a SS MTB race if you have a hammerfest itch to scratch. I have buddies who like to fly around like that, and racing calms them down for when we're just hitting the trails normally.

    On my rides, tracked with a Garmin 305, I roll 17mi. at an average speed of 10.5MPH, with about 1,600ft of climbing. Maybe look into getting a Garmin to help you track yourself.

  53. #53
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    At the beginning of each season, I can handle about twice a week (average ride at roughly 10 miles for about 35-40 min, few small hills and couple of big hills, on rigid 29er, 32x18), mostly because of my butt, but by May or June, I can ride just about everyday. I squat throughout the year (3 times a week, 5/5sec cadence, 8-12 reps to failure, 1 set), so that could be why I don't feel it in my legs as much.

  54. #54
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    I"m a 16T masher. I'd try 18, you may hate it at first. Then cut weekly ride back a bit and ride twice a week. You'll get stronger, then put the 16 back on.

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    Just I quick update from the morning ride with actual numbers . My last ride was on Wed night, so it has been two and half days and two hours since my last ride, which is a day and half less rest than normal. I carried about 8lbs of gear (camelback, pump, tools, spare tubes)

    Basic impressions: Starting out my legs didn't feel bad, I think I was actually faster than normal during the first couple of miles. Total ride time was about the same as any other day. I did feel like I lacked some overall power, especially on the steep climbs. I think I was a bit slower at the end. In general, the ride felt pretty good.

    Some real numbers! (a bit different than what I had posted earlier):

    Ride time 59.02
    distance 13.6
    avg speed 13.83 mph
    elevation gain 956ft

    Of course the numbers don't tell the entire story. I wish a had climb distance, climb time, grade, for the individual climbs. I know the longest and most gradual climb is .7 miles at about 3% grade. The other climbs are much steeper.
    Stuffing our faces at an ever smaller table.

  56. #56
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Recovery rides can be tough on SS..

    especially if geared too high. You may have a hard time spinning out the legs unless you can find a fairly consistent flatter ride to recover on. With SS, we are just forced into harder efforts sometimes that are not necessarily beneficial for speedy recovery sorta thing.

    Not sure if I missed it, but if you have a geared bike, maybe consider using it to ride on after a tough SS day.

    Gear down and spin the legs to help speed recovery so that you can push yourself again sooner on your SS bike.

    Another consideration would be to have a set up where you can EASILY swap out your rear cog for a lower gear to use on your recovery days. Depending you your set up, it may not be worth it to always be swapping rear cogs all the time..

    .02

  57. #57
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    Fu k everything. Ride your bike.

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    Listen O, I know you ride for fun and fitness. Most like you( and me also) enjoy the aspect of cross training to enhance our overall fitness. You need to ask yourself if you want to be a better rider or better at some other discipline. Most on this forum have a single track mind in regards to cycling(pun intended). They can give great advice for mtb and cycling. I suggest you take a look online at pro trainers and the suggested regimes for a rider of your fitness level. I can tell you they have more long easy mile rides than max aerobic/anaerobic days. Keep that in mind when you ride.
    If you enjoy fitness and you study it as you should, you should know that consistent max effort actually leads to pitfalls, injuries, and weakness/lag in fitness improvement. You should have the same fitness attitude toward improving cycling as much as any other discipline and you should know that the added variable of your bike and how it performs is very much an important part of improving your overall fitness level. If you want immediate improvement change your bike or bike setup. If you wanna take the hard route adjust your training to adapt to your bike, trails and rest.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    Fuel.
    Don't forget this. What does your post ride "re-fueling" strategy look like? Lots of protein or lots of carbs? If I get the protein and potassium back in, I can usually go several days in a row. If my diet is largely carbs though, I find I bonk early in a ride if I don't rest for several days.

    And has been mentioned already, try an easy ride every other ride to help the muscles get used to longer/more frequent use. IMO though, re-fueling is the biggest thing.

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