how many of you ride fully rigid?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    how many of you ride fully rigid?

    i'm just curious...i converted my geared mtb recently to a ss cuz i needed to replace the shifters and cog ANYWAY and i had been thinking about doing it for a little while, and i figured, hell, if i'm gonna get rid of the old shifters and cog, might as well ditch the front and rear der.'s, too, right?

    so anyway, it looks like my 2001 manitou mars elite is starting to crap out on me, too (i've had it for about 3 years, it's got about 4 or 5 races on it, but the last one, in october, was in gross mud and rain). i'm thinking about upgrading to a black elite, but don't really have the funds at the moment (i'm a college student...). but then i thought - why not toss a rigid fork on there? at least temporarily...

    just like the gears, sometimes i love front suspension (i've never even *considered* rear susspension...), but sometimes it's just a crazy hassle (especially when i've had to plunk down the cash to keep it maintained, since i wouldn't even know where to begin doing it myself...). you think it would be silly to go fully rigid? anyone else do it? comments/criticism?
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  2. #2
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    sure. pretty much any fork will do. v-brake or disc? a nice on e to start with, depending on your budget, is a Kona P2 fork. rides great, is fairly cheap, and did i say it rides great? any kona dealer can get on, or should have one hanging around for about $60. or go to konaworld.com and get one direct. if $$ is tight, than any old take of rigid from your lbs will work, so long as it's long enough, and has the right size/length of steer tube.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  3. #3
    Master of the Obvious
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    Dude Its real good!

    I started MTBing before Sus was common. I got my first Rockshox in '96. it took me awhile to get used to it, for the first three months I swore it robbed me of climbing power. But It grew on me and it became the norm. for the next several years I ran FullSus and hardtail Kleins w/ sus. Last year I bought a rigid KHS Solo-One as a training tool. it was finding a loved lost! It so reminded me of the BMX bikes I had as a kid! Yeah my arms where a little tired at first, but the combination of SS & rigid made my riding style smarter & faster. When I first bought the Solo-One the plan was to get a SuS fork when I had more cash(after all this was a training bike) but the more I rode it the more i loved it. It had pure climbing power, no bob or movement to rob me of momentum, I haven' rode a sus since The Fat tire 40 at Cheqaumegon last sept. I have since sold my klein and have built up a surly Karate monkey which I plan to keep rigid, I feel riding rigid forces you to find cleaner lines on the trail, Just becuase your sus fork allows you to plow straight ahead and no "feel" it in your arms means its more efficeint. Ther are some downhill's that i know are faster with a fork, but I really feel that I make up more time on the rest of the course to make the rigid fork beneficial.

  4. #4
    KgB
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    lots of people

    do a search,there was a poll not too long ago.
    me,almost four years on rigid
    I've been inside too long.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve0512
    you think it would be silly to go fully rigid? anyone else do it? comments/criticism?
    Silly? No. Best choice for you? Hard to say.

    You mentioned racing. If you race on rough terrain you might find the lack of suspension slows you down. Or you might find the more precise steering helps.

    Speaking from my own experience: except for a 1-year period in 2000-01, I've been riding fully rigid since I bought my first MTB in 1993. I don't do lots of long bomber downhills, however - for me mountain biking is about cruising around and exploring the woods (or desert), not about going as fast as I possibly can. Not that I don't like to go fast or do big downhills - it's just that for my riding style I've found that I don't get enough benefit from suspension to justify the weight, expense and maintenance.

    I would never deny that there are drawbacks to going rigid, though. For my riding style they're mostly tolerable, but for your riding style they may not be. Your wrists and hands may hurt on the longer, rougher downhills, or to stay in control you may find yourself slowing down on said downhills more than you would with a suspension fork.

    Sounds like you need to try it. Get a cheap rigid fork, take it out on a few rides, and if you don't like it you can recoup part of your investment on the mtbr classifieds.

  6. #6
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    Fully rigid since 2000...

    Ever since I built up my SS. Have only ridden my Gunnar hardtail 3 times since then (and the last two times was as a converted SS). But I can't seem to get used to a shock again (just feels inefficient and heavy), so there she sits collecting dust.....

    1GB
    Porrick

  7. #7
    rocky iv style
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    Pink and rigid since...

    just over a week ago. bought my first mtb, a low end hardtail about a year and a half ago, then quickly upgraded to a decent geared fs. a week and a half ago i got the pink 1x1 and jumped into rigid ss'ing with both feet. i hadn't ridden anything but the geared fs for basically a year and haven't touched it since getting the surly. right now i hang my mud caked clothes on the fs to dry out after riding the ss...anyway, go for it. get a cheap used fork if you're worried about the investment, but you will like it. i didn't realize that it made THAT much of a difference in climbing, i was wrong. replace it with a shock when you have to get a wrist rebuilt from too many years of riding rigid
    oh, and ride big squishy tires cuz it works and it looks awesome when you have monsters on your ride.

  8. #8
    Ebo
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    Rigid works for me too. Geared and SS. Check out Bikeman.com for a good selection of rigid forks, or hit up your LBS. I'm using a Kona P2 which are about $60.

  9. #9
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    I have a Kona P2 on my Surly 1x1 and dig it tremendously. I've been riding it that way since last season. I don't know if you can call it fully rigid though because of the fat Weirwolf 2.5 on it from which I get at least an inch of travel. Gotta compromise somewhere, right?

    Peace,

    Patrick

  10. #10
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    Sure, did it recently...

    I pulled the 80-120 mm Psylo off my On-One and put the stock rigid fork back on for "fun". Went on the inagural ride this weekend (about 20 or so miles). I am a little tender in the tricep and deltoid region, but mainly due to the climbing and the braking on long decents (generally out of shape too ). It was a hoot to be fully rigid again. Truly had an ear to ear grin on the decents. It worked well and I am considering keeping it rigid indefinitely, and running a larger front tire.

    Like you, I hate maintaining anything, or paying someone to do work I could do myself with the right tools/experience. So taking the sus fork off is a step in the right direction for me. I can pretty much wrench on anything else without feeling perplexed.

    Cheers (sorry it got long winded),

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  11. #11
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    rigid for now...

    I have a FS bike, but it's been mothballed for a while. My rigid 1x1 is my only rolling off-road mount right now. I originally built it up as a fun alternate bike, and find myself riding it almost exclusively (common SSer story it seems). I don't think I've raced geared since I got the 1x1 and figure if I'm gonna continue to race it instead of a gearie I'd like to have a sus. fork on it. Kinda low on funds right now though, so it's still rigid.

    -Trevor
    Last edited by TrevorInSoCal; 03-24-2004 at 12:41 AM. Reason: spelling

  12. #12
    cause it's fun
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    yep

    I ride rigid, but I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed
    bus driver wanna be

  13. #13
    Birdman aka JMJ
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    Got one of each, rigid is seeing the most use right now

    Got an aluminum 27speed full-suspension, steel 24 speed hardtail, and a rigid titanium singlespeed. I love riding the SS, riding it about 80% of the time so far this year.

    It's worth a try. Rigid forks are cheap and easy to find.

    JMJ

  14. #14
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    thanks for all the inspiration. i'm working on locating a rigid fork. i went down to my lbs, and they have a whole bunch of old school forks hanging from the rafters, but they're all threaded - bummer. they wanted me to give them like 85 bucks for a new surly fork, installed. that's ridiculous, if you ask me - how hard is it to install the fork? all i need to do is remove the old one, pop the crown race off (i've heard i can use like a paint scraper or something to do that), cut the steerer tube on the new one (i can probably find somewhere to do that myself...), and pop the crown race on (using a piece of pvc pipe and a hammer, no?) i'm scouring ebay right now, too.

    the surly 1x1 frame looks SOOOO tempting, though. i should just rebuild my bike as a gearie again, sell it, and buy the surly to build up myself - that would be awesome. the only thing stopping me is i have so many good memories tied up in the old girl, no one would be able or willing to pay me enough money to make selling worth it...
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  15. #15
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    Hey, Steve...

    That's almost exactly what I did a few years ago, except I sold a couple of gearies to finance my project. One was a Trek 7000 that was my first real off-road worthy bike. Rode sweetly for an aluminum bike and I never had trouble with the nine speed like so many people complain about. It found a home with a guy moving to South America who was going to ride the daylights out of it. The other was my first ride I bought myself. Specialized Hard Rock, 1995 edition I believe. Silver paint and red decals. Good looking bike. I put a child seat on the back for my 1 1/2 year old daughter who just loved to ride with me. But it and the child seat went to a man with a young child himself who came back later and told me how much fun it was for him and his child.

    Sorry to get long-winded here, but I wanted to let you know that bikes with great sentiment attached can go to good new homes where they'll be loved and ridden. I have fond memories of both those bikes, but once the Surly was done and touched the dirt I never would have ridden either on of them ever again. Better they be ridden than take up space in my garage. For sentiment though, I don't know if I could ever part with the 1x1....

    Peace,

    Patrick

  16. #16
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    I do.

    Good for the soul rigid riding is.

  17. #17
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    all rigid all the time

    Thanks to the Viagra....

    Sorry wrong forum....92 Yeti with Accutrax fork and ATAC stem...kept up with a guy on a FS just last week...he turned around and turned on the gas and I was right there with him.

    Ride and deciede...here in CO...lots of rigid SS'ers that I have seen

    Good luck
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  18. #18
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    installed a Surly 1x1 fork myself, here's a good resource...

    visit the Park tool site www.parktool.com for instructions on installing a fork. To set the crown race on the Surly I used a peice of plastic plumbing pipe. Or you could get your lbs to do that part.

  19. #19
    blame me for missed rides
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    rigid. yup.

  20. #20
    theHeadlessThompsonGunner
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    Quote Originally Posted by steve0512
    i'm working on locating a rigid fork. i went down to my lbs, and they have a whole bunch of old school forks hanging from the rafters, but they're all threaded - bummer. they wanted me to give them like 85 bucks for a new surly fork, installed. that's ridiculous, if you ask me - how hard is it to install the fork?
    I decided recently to do the rigid thing too, and Larry at mtnhighcyclery.com (Ventanarama on MTBR) quoted me an awesome price (much better than your LBS's) for a 1 x 1 fork, and an even better order timeframe. He's local for me, but I've heard his shipping prices are only shipping--none of the flat-rate handling charges found at most places.

    Installing a fork is easy, and lots of good info can be found. Chances are, you can just measure your old fork and cut the new one with a pipe cutter to the same length. ALWAYS STAY VERY LONG ON THE FIRST CUT. Just stack some spacers in until you figure out how much you actually need, and you'll be prepared for a clean final cut! Good luck!
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  21. #21
    Glutton for punishment
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    Yep, I ride rigid. Surly 1X1 fork on my Spot "John Deere Green" single speed. Heh.

  22. #22
    Not because I'm fast.....
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    I do and it's FUN

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  23. #23
    DSR
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    Yup. I feel that rigid is just as critical as one speed on my SS. Super efficient on the ups. And 100% concentration on the downs. S

  24. #24
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    Sus fork virgin...

    ...not COMPLETELY a virgin, I flirted with it for awhile. I once installed a Trek suspension fork on my Cannondale in 1991 - heavy as hell, squirted oil, lost air, etc. Put the Ritchey rigid forks back on, loved it and stayed rigid to this day. I'm sure that suspension forks have come a long way since then, and I'm not saying that I will NEVER buy a squishy fork, but I'm satisfied my fully rigid Surly.

    Who knows, maybe I just don't know any better?

    Pax

  25. #25
    Brakes?
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    HUH HUH....You guys said 'rigid'...

    Rigid and on my single since 1999.

    viagra? We don' need no stinkin' viagra...

  26. #26
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    i do


  27. #27
    KRN
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    uh.....

    What are the plus & minus of a rigid fork I've been biking from the time Juli & John were King & queen.When sus came into effect everybody & me jumped on the wagon.We all heard that going downhill & over tech stuff was alot faster then staying rigid.Was there any truth to that? Or did we all just belive the hype?

  28. #28
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    More Turgid than Rigid this rider is...

    ...great Yoda speak.

    Fast I am not, but with the Force I am. No?

    Sean

    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyPete
    Good for the soul rigid riding is.
    Professional Amateur

  29. #29
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    pluses and minuses of rigid......

    Plus - its rigid. More of a challenge.
    Minus - its rigid. More of a challenge.

    Rigid SS - Rider thinks "can I do this??!!"
    4 inch FS, 27 gears - Rider thinks "the bike will do it for me."

  30. #30
    cause it's fun
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    Quote Originally Posted by KRN
    What are the plus & minus of a rigid fork I've been biking from the time Juli & John were King & queen.When sus came into effect everybody & me jumped on the wagon.We all heard that going downhill & over tech stuff was alot faster then staying rigid.Was there any truth to that? Or did we all just belive the hype?
    Going up hill + for rigid (no bob = more efficient)
    Going down a rocky (tech) hill - for rigid

    With a rigid fork you will have to adjust your riding style, and as mentioned you will learn become a more efficient rider and to pick a better line. I also believe that pinch flats are more common with a rigid fork. However the rigid fork also makes me feel like I have much more controll over my bike in those "technical" parts of the ride. IMHO small price to pay.

    A front shock is obviously more forgiving of mistakes. IMHO it's all personal preference. Go with what ever makes you happy and ride it as much as possibel! That is they key to happiness!!!
    bus driver wanna be

  31. #31
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    Cold, hard,

    rigid steel. It sports a big wide carbon riser to provide a little damping effect. Much fun and very pleasant to throw through the singletrack. Long rocky downhills- now you get your upper body workout as well!

  32. #32
    giddy up!
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    I like to ride rigid....

    but not "fully rigid"......I tried fully rigid for a while, but it was too tough, so I went back to a regular old rigid fork, it's been great so far....
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  33. #33
    Penis Goat!
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    Here's my old rigid MongooSSe. I also own a hardtail Specialized Hardrock (which I'm thinking of converting to SS now) with an 80mm Duke XC, and while it is more comfortable, I don't think it makes that big of a difference. You should definately be fine on the rigid.
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