How important is geometry for SSing?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How important is geometry for SSing?

    It seems like geometry could be a little more upright for SSing, since you have to be out of the saddle on the climbs and descents anyway...
    The setup on mine right now is much more upright than my NRS, and I was wondering if I should swap for a longer stem. I keep wanting to push my butt farther back.

    thanks for any input.

  2. #2
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    Good job! Comfy?

    For me, being a semi-old curmudgeon, comfort has become paramount, then style and such.

    I've now four SS and/or fixed gear bikes (actually only one SS!) with another on the way. Midge bars/WTB drops/Carbon riser/aluminium riser and cheapo moustachio. Stems are Thomson 110mm/5 degree, 130mm/5 degree, 140mm/15 degree and two Salsa's...both 40 degree rise (for the Midgelette's!). I flip and flop 'em all around on a regular basis. In fact, by afternoon's end, three will transform today!

    The Surly 1X1 is the only one I feel the need to "push my butt farther back"....so today she gets the Thomson 140/15, and the el' cheapo moustache. She actually likes that combo best! (Hey Surly! We need a longer TT on the XL one by one!)

    Run the combo that you find most comforting. Took me a long while to overcome my fear of the "fashion police".....I just like to ride and be ultra-comfy.

    Do what makes YOU happy! Heh.

    Sorry if I ranted. One of those days......



    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBearings
    It seems like geometry could be a little more upright for SSing, since you have to be out of the saddle on the climbs and descents anyway...
    The setup on mine right now is much more upright than my NRS, and I was wondering if I should swap for a longer stem. I keep wanting to push my butt farther back.

    thanks for any input.

  3. #3
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    ... and if we just ... Geometry

    Boy, am I "ranty"......

    To actually answer your question, I'd imagine geometry differences between SS and gearie shouldn't really be all that different. I've run stock rigid, longer rigid and sussy forks on all my bikes, and they all have merits. On the 1X1, I have the "most fun" with the stock rigid fork, which allows very (??) quick handling as opposed to those that slacken the geometry.

    A longer stem does not change the geometry of your ride, only your perceived level of comfort and control.

  4. #4
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    Good job! The pseudo-science of the Nerd Board and how it can improve your cycling comfort.

    Don't worry about your stem length until you are sure that your saddle is in the correct position. You seem to fit your NRS well, so let's start there. You should put your saddle in the same fore-aft position on your new bike.

    If you have different saddles (likely?) it will be difficult to replicate the proper fore-aft adjustment from your other bike, but you can get it close. You need to make yourself a Nerd BoardTM.

    1) use a plumb line dropped from the nose of the saddle (on your NRS) to see how far behind the bb it is. Write down this measurement.

    2) Now you need a bit of wood for a Nerd Board. Put two long screws in a board about 4 - 4.5" inches apart.

    3) Put saddle number one (from the NRS) on the board and slide it forward between the screws until it stops. Mark the nose location on the board. Now do the same for the second saddle. Write down the measured difference between the two saddles.

    4) Armed with this measurement, you can mount your new saddle on your singlespeed in a position that will feel very familiar to your bum.

    So, for example, I normally ridea San Marco Aspide saddle, with 70mm of setback behind the BB. If I want to use a Fizik Areone, the Nerd Board tells me that I need to mount it at 90mm of setback to get the same feel.

    This assumes that 4" or so is the "sweet spot" where you like to sit... the science is not perfect, but it will get the saddles so close that you and your knees won't notice the difference.

    JMH

    PS, if you build a Nerd Board of your own, you owe me $5. =)

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBearings
    It seems like geometry could be a little more upright for SSing, since you have to be out of the saddle on the climbs and descents anyway...
    The setup on mine right now is much more upright than my NRS, and I was wondering if I should swap for a longer stem. I keep wanting to push my butt farther back.

    thanks for any input.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBearings
    It seems like geometry could be a little more upright for SSing, since you have to be out of the saddle on the climbs and descents anyway...
    The setup on mine right now is much more upright than my NRS, and I was wondering if I should swap for a longer stem. I keep wanting to push my butt farther back.

    thanks for any input.
    I think it makes sense to be more upright on a one speed. I am usually kinda stretched out over my suspended bikes only because I climb seated and I need some weight over the front wheel to keep it down. On my surly, I used to run a 120mm stem and I was comfortable but I felt kinda vulnerable on the DH. I switched to a 85mm stem and I am way more upright. It makes sense to me because I am almost always standing up on the pedals in some way or another. With the shorter stem I can put my weight farther back over the rear wheel when climbing, therefore increasing traction (I always climb standing up on the pedals when SSing). On the DH, the short stem gives me more confidence going down because my butt is farther behind the saddle than with a longer stem.

    I have been wondering if there is any benefit going with "standard XC geometry" for a custom SS frame. I have been interested in riding one of those DJ/Urban/trail frames from one of those really small but core builders like Evil or 243. It seems that a shorter TT and stays may help a SS rider on the ups and downs? If you think about it, most people climb standing, so you don't really need an "attack position" all stretched out like a XC rider. Shorter stays put the rear wheel under your body a bit more and therefore provide more traction when climbing. With the shorter TT and stays, you should be able to get farther behind your saddle and over your rear wheel for the gnarly descents. This is all speculation as I have never really ridden a bike with such geometry.

    I am really interested in hearing how a bike like the EVIL Sovereign handle on trails. The geometry seems pretty flexible and might help in the really rough and technical stuff. what do you guys think?
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