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  1. #1
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    How to fit SS riding in training program and an injury question

    Last year I converted my second mtb to SS, a 23.4 lb Kona Explosif.
    I started riding it at the end of my racing season (Oct); I even raced once for fun.
    Near Christmas started having a slight pain above knee, I didn't cut on training (running, SS and geared cycling) and I ended up with Chondromalacia (Runners Knee). I tried to cure my self up and ended up in the doctor at the end of February. Started, physical therapy and easy rides with high cadence on my geared bikes.
    Most of my fitness gone out of the window and started again base training with long easy rides. This year, I try to follow David Morris training approach (back to back days of training) and just have ended the endurance phase.
    My target after injury is to race XC sept-oct and one 4-day mtb stage race. Hence I need to do long rides back-to-back once a week or so. Because my climbing power and endurance has gone, Iím starting maximum sustainable short intervals and then maximum sustainable long intervals.
    Problem is I miss my SS bike but I can not find a way to fit it in my current training regime which goes like this: 2days long rides, 2 days rest, 2 or 3 days intervals, 2 or 3 days rest. I also have a fear of hurting again my injured knee.
    Does anyone have training suggestions using a SS bike? Are there others racing geared but also like riding SS all year round, not only off-season? Did anyone had the same injury, if yes after how long started riding SS again?
    Apologies for posting so long

  2. #2
    @adelorenzo
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    Last I checked, every time I ride my singlespeed it is basically an "interval workout." Find some trails that go up and down and attack all the hills.

    Not sure what that will do for your knee pain issues though.

  3. #3
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    The main thing I can suggest is to get out of the saddle while climbing ALL hills!! I have found that all knee pain disappears when I keep the stress off my knees. Grinding and mashing only stretches and strains your ligaments and tendons. As far as a fitness program, I think anytime you get on a single speed and climb you are going to get stronger.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by vindiggitydog
    The main thing I can suggest is to get out of the saddle while climbing ALL hills!!
    That I was doing exactly before "runners knee". Even in my geared road bike I was riding all hills at 50x19 mostly standing, I even bought a Kona paddy wagon to ride ss in road (and for commuting) when weather was bad for mtb.
    I don't really know if too much SS was the problem or 1hr running workouts or some weight lifting or poor fit in my road. Maybe it was a compination of some or all of them

  5. #5
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    I suggest working your knee at the gym on the nautilus machines (pulley and plates) and not using free weights at all. Then slowly work your way back to the bike while cross training at the gym. You should perform leg curls and leg raises, as well as, leg press and calf raises (all on the machines with plates and pins, ie no free weights). Limit your workouts to 30 minutes at the gym and progressively increase your riding time.

    Also, I would stay out of the big chain ring for a while (50x19). Spin faster and shift down on the rear cassette if you want to stand and pedal (Carmichael Training).

    Then do light rides on SS, and progressively increase the intensity.

    If you start to feel any pain whatsoever, I would increase the recovery time (rest days). Make sure you rest up completely before hitting the trails again.

    That's my 2 cents...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjphillips
    I suggest working your knee at the gym on the nautilus machines (pulley and plates) and not using free weights at all. Then slowly work your way back to the bike while cross training at the gym. You should perform leg curls and leg raises, as well as, leg press and calf raises (all on the machines with plates and pins, ie no free weights). Limit your workouts to 30 minutes at the gym and progressively increase your riding time.

    Also, I would stay out of the big chain ring for a while (50x19). Spin faster and shift down on the rear cassette if you want to stand and pedal (Carmichael Training).

    Then do light rides on SS, and progressively increase the intensity.

    If you start to feel any pain whatsoever, I would increase the recovery time (rest days). Make sure you rest up completely before hitting the trails again.

    That's my 2 cents...
    Counterpoint from a non-physical therapist ... but I slept at a holiday inn:

    I have had repeated knee problems of various types. I have been told repeatedly to stay away from extensions and to concentrate on closed form lifts ... where the weight transfers through the legs to the floor, like squats, lunges, etc ...

    In my experience, the is a breakdown of form associated with every injury, and the injury isn't overcome until the form problem is identified and eliminated.

    I had some knee pain after my first week of consistent SS riding. Concentrating on keeping my hips, knee and ankle aligned solved the problem. I have to make a conscious effort to do this when I get tired.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjphillips

    Also, I would stay out of the big chain ring for a while (50x19). Spin faster and shift down on the rear cassette if you want to stand and pedal (Carmichael Training).

    Then do light rides on SS, and progressively increase the intensity.
    2 months after therapy I was only doing high cadence, easy rides and isometric and eccentric exercises. No hills, no standing, no low cadence, no free weights.
    Third month started to add some hills and some out of the saddle (seconds) but in easy-moderate pace. I tried a couple of light SS rides with no pain what so ever. Last week I did a fairly hard road ride, 5h+ with 6500ft elevation and some steep hills, plenty of low cadence and out of the saddle without any pain. Little discomfort now and then but my physio told me that its natural.
    Started to do some half-squads also but I don't feel secure yet and I might stop them.

    Thanks

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