How do you handle mud?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Retro Grouch
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    How do you handle mud?

    Well fall has come and so has the rain. The mud here is rarely the clinging clay type, more toward sticky sand. Still it slows you down and sucks your stamina. How about you? How do you deal with the mud?
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  2. #2
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    I move to someplace drier.

  3. #3
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    uhhh....suck it up and keep pedaling... maybe get some mud tires

  4. #4
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    or go around the mud

  5. #5
    nothing to see here
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    I eat it
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  6. #6
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJRiegler
    uhhh....suck it up and keep pedaling... maybe get some mud tires
    This is how I handle it. Hey RJR, as for your other reply, here in the North Wet, there is no going around the mud. This universe is made of mud.

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  7. #7
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    This is how I handle it. Hey RJR, as for your other reply, here in the North Wet, there is no going around the mud. This universe is made of mud.

    --sParty
    And the Lord said, "Let there be mud!" and there was mud; and the hordes rode their singlespeeds in the sticky mess and he saw that it was good..
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  8. #8
    master blaster
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    michelin xc at 2.00-2.20
    i love riding in the mud so much especially when your with a group who hates it, then you can roost them everytime you pass a puddle.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    And the Lord said, "Let there be mud!" and there was mud; and the hordes rode their singlespeeds in the sticky mess and he saw that it was good..

  10. #10
    Ride,Smile, Pedal Damn it
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    Bunny hop that sloppy mud. Or..
    Ride through it (on its terms), it is in control, if you try to steer through it you may go splat.
    At least when you go splat, its in mud and not a rock garden.
    Hopefully not a mud coated rock garden.
    Either way, ENJOY. Its better than being anywhere, almost!

  11. #11
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Mud?

    You don't ride mud. Mud rides you.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails How do you handle mud?-dsc_0002.jpg  

    How do you handle mud?-dsc_0011.jpg  


  12. #12
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    And the Lord said, "Let there be mud!" and there was mud; and the hordes rode their singlespeeds in the sticky mess and he saw that it was good..
    Quite so. You've just answered your own question

  13. #13
    is buachail foighneach me
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    I avoid it if I can, And if I cant, Gorilla:

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3541352792/" title="litnus by anrothardonn, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2071/3541352792_221cc9b336.jpg" width="500" height="328" alt="litnus" /></a>

  14. #14
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    sweet, pics guys. no harm ment in my post, i too am up on the Olympic Peninsula so i know how it goes happy trails

  15. #15
    Mtbr Forum Sponsor - Homebrewed Components
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    small block 8's. Instead of fighting it, i just go with it.
    If there's no tread, you got nothing to clog, right?

  16. #16
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    How do you handle mud?

    Let it dry!
    Ride, Race or just polish it.... Do it till you smile!

  17. #17
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    Put on a slightly bigger cog.

  18. #18
    nothing to see here
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    Quote Originally Posted by justonegear
    How do you handle mud?

    Let it dry!
    that's about as much fun as watching paint dry, but slower.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  19. #19
    Oaktown Honkey on Strava
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    Fenders work "THe" front.

    Plus I use winter bike to thrash. I have XT cassette, 3 front rings, and chain sitting on shelf for my other bike for spring. Winter s.s. is really junky, but SIR 9 s.s. is too sweet to trash every mud ride.

  20. #20
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    At the risk of being lynched in this forum, I ride my geared bike when it's muddy (or snowy).

  21. #21
    Pedaler of dirt
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    When it gets muddy I stick on a set of spiky tyres, up the pressure to 40-50psi and go out and spin like crazy.

    Tyres like this...



    ... are the only way to tackle the mud.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by miatagal96
    At the risk of being lynched in this forum, I ride my geared bike when it's muddy (or snowy).
    Hmmm...where's that rope...

    Seriously? Mud has become one of the main factors in many local riders (Disciples of Dirt, Eugene, OR -- where the Willamette Valley mud is legendary) decisions buy a 2nd bike for winter use. In the end, buying a relatively cheap SS saves money compared to replacing expensive shocks, suspension forks & fancy multi-sprocket drivetrain components.

    So what I'm saying is many folks out here do exactly the opposite as you -- run gearie in the dry and SS in the wet.

    Joking about the rope. It's all mountain biking... it's all good.

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
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    This guy has built his whole philosophy on riding in the English peat. Not sure how it would translate to riding on rocks but it probably works for what he does with it.

    http://clelandcycles.wordpress.com/bikes-1978-2010/

    I also used to ride with a friend who loved the mud because it made boring trails challenging. Personally I would rather ride difficult trails in the dry but sometimes the only choice is ride in the muck or don't ride.
    No it never stops hurting, but if you keep at it you can go faster.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    ...How do you deal with the mud?
    soap & water

    (and sometimes I need to brush my teeth twice)

  25. #25
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by modifier
    ... sometimes the only choice is ride in the muck or don't ride.
    Please don't say don't ride.

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  26. #26
    Ahhh the pain....
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    I live in AZ....what is mud?

  27. #27
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka brad
    Well fall has come and so has the rain. The mud here is rarely the clinging clay type, more toward sticky sand. Still it slows you down and sucks your stamina. How about you? How do you deal with the mud?
    Very well, thank you.
    mtbtires.com
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  28. #28
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    I live in Socal. let me tell you what mud is!

  29. #29
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    Michelin XC AT's gave me good mud clearance...

  30. #30
    pain is good
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    Wink

    Small Block Eights, then spray w/ Pam. I also hear it's good for your skin.

  31. #31
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    "How to you handle mud?"

    1/ Move the center of mass as high as possible because taller bikes take longer to fall. This is especially useful when the wheels slide sideways.

    2/ Move the center of mass rearwards as less weight on the front wheel will reduce the amount that it digs in. This also means that if the front wheel slips sideways it will have less of an effect on the balance of the bike. And a front wheel that is lifted off the ground can't slip.

    3/ Fit some serious full length fenders and mud flaps.

    4/ Make sure the wheel frame clearances are excellent. Fitting 26" wheels to a 650b frame or 650b wheels to a 29er frame or can help with this.

    5/ Fit guards between the chain and rear tire and above the chain and freewheel to keep the running gear mud free. Alternatively, run the chain through tubes.

    6/ Fit enclosed hub-brakes, Roller-Brakes or mud shields to disk brakes.

    7/ Use the lowest possible tire pressures to improve flotation and traction. Open tread patterns self clean better and shallow treads trap less mud. The best tire widths depend on the depth and viscosity of the mud and the nature of the underlying terrain.

    8/ Learn some new riding techniques. Hitting the worst mud patches at maximum speed whilst pulling a wheelie is good. The idea is to get to the other side before the front wheel lands.

    9/ Fitting elliptical chain-rings can help reduce rear wheel spin out.

    10/ Most of all have lots of good clean funHow do you handle mud?-3516204966_97d66d3712_b.jpg

    Mudbike - The 1982 Cleland Aventura - YouTube

    Cleland Cycles | Cross-country bicycles

  32. #32
    Bedwards Of The West
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    X2 on the Michelin XC's... I bought a stash when they were on closeout. And I have a hose attached to the hot water heater in the garage. Warm water rinse for me and the bike upon returning from the sloppy spring trails above the house.

    edit: I guess that's a X3 on the michelins. Great tires for the slop.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  33. #33
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    I found that there's a point after the mud cakes your tread so tightly and turns your tires into slicks where it starts developing it's own unique tread you can use.


  34. #34
    Sweep the leg!
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    Quote Originally Posted by can't get right View Post
    I move to someplace drier.
    Location, location, location!
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  35. #35
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    Graham has the full skinny on how to build a mud bike. I have done so in the past but with full suspension which makes for much easier riding on slick rocks and logs and you don't loose as much forward momentum as with rigid.

    But where I am people really frown on anyone riding on muddy trails (and frankly I'm tired of cleaning up after it) so it happens so infrequently that the only mud accessory I use any more is a set of skinny DH mud tires with really soft durometer. Skinny for clearance and bite, soft to stick and big tall knobs to claw.

  36. #36
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    I found that there's a point after the mud cakes your tread so tightly and turns your tires into slicks where it starts developing it's own unique tread you can use.
    Yes, the mud on the tires tends to stick quite well to the mud on the ground. It's important pedal smoothly, to much force and a lot of energy can be wasted in the form of rear wheel spin.

    Some of the tall nobbles on so called mud tires can be a problem in these sticky mud situations. This is because the deeper the tread the more mud it can hold onto, causing the wheels can grow in size until they jam up solid.

    25+ years of mud riding have taught me the value of shallow open tread patterns. They grip just as well as more aggressive tread designs but are more likely to clear as the wheels rotate. The flexing of low pressure is useful as it both improves traction and helps dislodge flakes of mud from the gaps in between the nobbles.

    Some tire tread designs reviewed as "not good in mud" are actually quite good if you take the trouble to drop the air pressures. For example: Schwalbe' Racing Ralph.

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