Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kenni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    21

    how cruical is chain alignment?

    ok its my first singlespeed and ive got the chainline near as damn it straight but its not perfect
    what will happen if i leave it and does it need to be perfect

    ta

  2. #2
    one chain loop
    Reputation: fishcreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,360
    not really important. drivetrain will wear fast or worse chain will skip. it will be either busted knees, concussion, tooth loss, sprained ankles, road rash, crushed nuts or all of the above. j/k. keep your chain line straight.
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  3. #3
    Shocks?, Pegs?... Lucky!
    Reputation: fritzaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    799
    Try finding some small spacers and toying with them, move the CL in small increments. That will help.
    Are you running a Converted Cassette hub or a SS specific hub? Cassette hubs are easy to get straight, with the spacers...

  4. #4
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
    Reputation: CHUM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,631
    just imagine every sensitive part of your body simultaneously (and at the speed of light) slamming into your handlebar/fork stanchion/stem when you throw your chain....all the while clipped in and ending in a slow speed 1/2 crash/endo on your side.....if you're lucky....

    it feels like someone tieing one end of a rope to your seatpost and the other end to "immovable-stationary-object" of your choice......it's sudden and sucky....






    or....as stated above.....you wear your chain/ring/cog out quicker......but why risk it?
    Click Here for Forum Rules

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,667
    Get it as good as you can. The longer your chainstays the less important. Run a 1/8th chain and that should help. I try not to have it more than 0.5mm off.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Treybiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,041
    Just get it close to where the chain line is parallel to the chainring. If its off a tad, no big. Remember that the middle chainring on a mountain bike with gears works from one extreem to the other (as in chain line on a 9 speed cassette).

  7. #7
    Rincon Local
    Reputation: mpbspt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    55
    Measure the center of your chainring from the center of your seat tube up in front and try to match that value with the distance of your cog from the center of your rear dropouts. The closer you get - the less premature wear and tear and risk of derailment - and no one likes anything with the word premature in it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  8. #8
    Shocks?, Pegs?... Lucky!
    Reputation: fritzaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    799
    Quote Originally Posted by mpbspt
    Measure the center of your chainring from the center of your seat tube up in front and try to match that value with the distance of your cog from the center of your rear dropouts. The closer you get - the less premature wear and tear and risk of derailment - and no one likes anything with the word premature in it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Or just put the chain on, stand behind your bike in the workstand, and look at it to make sure it's not "bending".

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kenni's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    21
    thanks guys thats really helpful

    by the way ive just got back from a 90 minuite ride and it did seem ok

    and im loving the Spot (on the flat)

  10. #10
    Rincon Local
    Reputation: mpbspt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by fritzaholic
    Or just put the chain on, stand behind your bike in the workstand, and look at it to make sure it's not "bending".
    If you do this use your dominant eye - in other words use monocular vision to properly assess the chain line.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.