How to alleviate my aching (possible arthritic) wrist?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    How to alleviate my aching (possible arthritic) wrist?

    An otherwise healthy 30 year-old but as of late my right wrist hurts. Work out or run about 4-6 times a week and ride either my fixed Surly Steamroller or rigid Kona Unit on a daily basis. The wrist pain occurs on both of my bikes, but mainly on the Unit. My own conclusion; bumpy trail riding makes the pain more distinct.

    Now, I haven't down much research on this (can imagine it's a common issue) but the aching area (mainly around the triquetral bone) matches the area of my arthritic mothers hands as well. A lot of folks in my family has troubling joints, so I suspect my wrists will get their fair share as well.

    Hence my question; what can I do to minimize the pain? What upgrades would be suitable? I've been thinking about getting a fat bike and I'm planning on getting bigger tires (but haven't thus far).

    My latest idea, as of last night, I've also started looking into suspension forks – even though it would probably be expensive and somewhat take away the no-bull**** approach from my bikes.


    Any input or tips on this?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by jocke; 08-31-2016 at 05:49 AM. Reason: Clarification

  2. #2
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    Speaking as a sufferer myself - I cannot ride rigid forked bikes at all - anymore.

    Bigger tyres at lower pressures would help, but have you considered suspension forks ?

    Also, I have found that gloves with good padded/Gel inserts help a lot.

    Strangely, I don't seem to have as many problems - since running wider bars. Perhaps it's the angle my wrists are at?

    You may want to experiment with this too - or even bull-horn trail bars, or bar ends (if you don't already have them) to find the most comfortable position for you
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  3. #3
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    Ergon grips helped my fiancιs wrist pain.

  4. #4
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    3-Vok,
    yeah – a suspension fork is the latest thought that crossed my mind. Would be quite the investment though, so kinda hesitant. Although I guess it would probably be the most helpful in soaking up trail chatter.

    coke,
    thanks for the suggestion. Surely would be a cheaper option. Should grab a pair right away.

  5. #5
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    I have psoriatic arthritis which can flare up and be really hard to deal with. I do take a drug to keep it in check but every so often it gets to be a little much. I feel your pain here. What I have found that really works on my rigid ss is to get a fatter grip onto your bike. I just went to the LBS and found a nice fat lock on grip (round, forgot the brand) that looked cool and matched the bike. That, plus a pair of gloves, have alleviated any hand issues that I had and I happily gave up the idea of putting a suspension fork on that bike. I ride single track with a bunch of roots and haven't had hand issues (unless I completely screw up a line and slam hard into a root, which hurts the entire body so I try not to do that).

    You could also try going to a carbon bar, which I hear is good for getting that trail chatter muted. The Niner RDO bar has enough flex in it to do a good job.

  6. #6
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    latte1973,
    thanks for the help. Maybe I also should look into a carbon bar. Right now I'm using an Easton Monkey Bar. Love it, but have no idea regarding its flex. Also gloves are incoming, but haven't found any gel ones I like. Should probably look a bit further before I order the Giro DND ones.

    As for grips, I'm using Lizards Skins Northshore which are quite fat in their fit. Great grip, bigger diameter which makes me relax my grip. But if Ergon grips are better for me, then the Northshore grips will have to go.

  7. #7
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    I do a lot of riding and racing (100 milers & 24 hour solos) on both suspension and rigid forks and rigid often brings out the aches and pains for me if I'm trying to go fast on the descents. Here's what I've tried to soften things up:

    Aired down high volume tire. I've run 2.4 Ardent and 2.35 Ikon with good results.

    Quality carbon bar. I haven't tried a lot of bars but my Thomson riser and RF Next have worked well. Keep in mind not all carbon bars perform the same in terms of reducing vibration

    Grips. I've run both ESI Chunky and Extra Chunky and they're awesome. Best bang for the buck, you can find them online ~$14 shipped. The Extra Chunky are tough to get on the bar and once it's on it'll probably have to be cut off.

    Bike setup. This is kind of obvious but it's important. Small changes in riding position and even riding style can make a difference.

  8. #8
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    Hand position might play a role as well. Ensure brake levers are angled down so that your wrist curves down slighly over the top of the grip. When cruising, climbing, or when you don't need to use your brakes as much, try putting your thumb over the grip, instead of under. This helps to put your wrist in a natural/relaxed position vs angled up. It'll put less stress on the wrist in the bumpy stuff too. It definitely feels weird, but try it out. My 2 cents...

  9. #9
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    Every little bit helps. Gloves, carbon bar, grips, as low of tire pressure as you can get away with.

    I use ESI Chunky on my rigid mtb. I tried Extra Chunky but they are too big for my hands(too big when I'm wearing gloves, anyway.) I'd give the Extra Chunky a try if I were you. They do provide a lot of cushion. Using an air compressor makes getting ESI grips on and off much, much easier.

    I have Northshore lock-ons on my FS bike. I find them pretty comfortable compared to other lock-ons I've used, but I haven't tried them on a rigid bike.

    I have Ergon GP2 on my gravel bike and flat bar road bike. Very comfortable. I didn't like that series for mountain biking because I felt like it interfered with my hand positioning, but I haven't tried the Ergons that are specifically designed for mountain biking.

    These things are new and might be worth a shot. Revolution Suspension Grips - Review - Pinkbike
    Pricey though.
    Last edited by Geralt; 09-01-2016 at 12:08 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocke View Post
    3-Vok,
    yeah – a suspension fork is the latest thought that crossed my mind. Would be quite the investment though, so kinda hesitant. Although I guess it would probably be the most helpful in soaking up trail chatter.
    IME suspension will make more difference than everything else you could do combined. Get a good one.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    IME suspension will make more difference than everything else you could do combined. Get a good one.
    Yeah. Can't argue with that.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    Aired down high volume tire. I've run 2.4 Ardent and 2.35 Ikon with good results.
    Yeah, I have a feeling that this one is pretty much happening anyhoo. Just haven't gotten around to it, but I want to try 2.4 out (going from 2.25).


    Quote Originally Posted by Thrawn View Post
    Hand position might play a role as well (...) try putting your thumb over the grip, instead of under.
    Funny you should mention this, since it's become a thing I'm doing when out riding. May have read it somewhere earlier and just tried it out, not sure, but it's a small but effective trick. General hand position is also I should look into a bit more; should get a shorter stem for at least my Steamroller, if not my Unit as well.


    Quote Originally Posted by Geralt View Post
    Every little bit helps. I have Ergon GP2 (...) but I haven't tried the Ergons that are specifically designed for mountain biking.
    Yeah, those fancy grips were super expensive. Looks interesting, but probably won't pull the trigger. And regarding the Ergon grips, the GS1 model looks interesting – also comes in a bigger size which is a bonus!


    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    IME suspension will make more difference than everything else you could do combined. Get a good one.
    Yeah, I have the same feeling. I would have to dig into it though, as I have no knowledge or experience. Also have this feeling that it maybe would be a smart thing to get a new set of wheels (/front wheel) – which would make that upgrade even more expensive.

  13. #13
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    I also suffer from chronic wrist/hand pain due to psoriatic arthritis. I have been riding exclusively rigid single speed for 4 years. What I have found helpful is:

    1. ESI chunky grips
    2. Good quality set of Velcro wrist braces to use only when riding
    3. Penetrex brand cream (available on Amazon) applied to the offending joint(s) regularly
    4. Good pair of riding gloves (for me padded vs non-padded don't seem to be different in terms of alleviating pain). The thickness of the material is what matters most. Thicker gloves seem to absorb vibration better.
    5. Titanium handlebar

    I also rode for years with a 100mm front fork and while I still suffered from pain at that time, it has gotten slightly worse since I've been riding rigid.

    To the OP, good luck, try different things, and since it sounds like you really enjoy riding rigid, don't give up just yet.

  14. #14
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    Ive broken both wrists several times, I have had carpel tunnel surgery on both wrists, and I have arthritus in both hands and wrists.

    Let me tell ya Ive struggled with discomfort to the point its driven me off the bike many times. Currently, too ride my rigid SS Im using ESI chunky and extra chunky grips, a Bontrager carbon bar, and a nice cromo fork with some flex.

    Ive found ergon grips make matters worse for me. Cant use em.
    It does feel better with less air in the tires as well, but I dont like the chance of rolling a front tire, Ive done it, it sucks.

    A nice riser bar puts more weight on your butt, helps alleviate hand pain, but then you may need a better seat.

    Experimentation has been key to stay on the bike. Everyones different, so you need to find what works for you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jocke View Post
    Work out or run about 4-6 times a week and ride either my fixed Surly Steamroller or rigid Kona Unit on a daily basis.
    That's a lot of abuse and little rest. I recently upped my workout regimen to 6 times per week (3 rides, 3 upper body lifts) at age 43, and soon came the hand/wrist problems. Pull-ups and supinated curls seem to cause the most problems. And landing jumps, which caused pain around the triquetral bone (hadn't heard of this bone until you mentioned it, but yeah, that's exactly where I was hurting recently, on both wrists).

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    IME suspension will make more difference than everything else you could do combined. Get a good one.
    Quote Originally Posted by Geralt View Post
    Yeah. Can't argue with that.
    I can argue with anything! Suspension provides massive cushioning, but also opens up the bike's potential. Once I add suspension, I start going faster, hitting bigger jumps, doing more technical. I actually get more wrist problems with suspension.

    Quote Originally Posted by evad nosam View Post
    A nice riser bar puts more weight on your butt, helps alleviate hand pain.
    Quote Originally Posted by jocke View Post
    General hand position is also I should look into a bit more; should get a shorter stem for at least my Steamroller, if not my Unit as well.
    I think set-up is the first thing to examine. I like high bars on a rigid SS. It compromises handling a bit, but is comfy, descends better, and great for standing climbs, IME. Short stem is a plus as long as you can maintain neutral/heavy feet on the pedals. Then there's the grip/lever position/angle. Get this wrong, and your wrists will be weak chain in absorbing impacts - which sounds like what's going on. ESI grips and low psi tires are great, but they won't fix a poorly set up cockpit. Check your bar rotation; Easton's have 9/5 sweep, which is considered pretty wrist-friendly, but how they're rotated is key. Width, height, stem length - one can go mad (and poor).

    Quote Originally Posted by Geralt View Post
    These things are new and might be worth a shot. Revolution Suspension Grips - Review - Pinkbike
    Pricey though.
    I now have two rides on these (on my trail bike) and dig them. They eat up ~2" of bar space, so haven't yet tried them on my SS's narrowish bar. Main advantage (for me) is they seem to reduce the jolt upon my wrists sustained during front-end impacts.

  16. #16
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    My short review of Revolution grips after 1st ride:

    They work as advertised, and sort of like how singletrackmack describes the big gooey Ourys [stetch a few mm in any direction], but moreso. I bought them to soften impacts upon my girly wrists, and they seemed to do this. Not fully sold yet, but pretty impressed. They ate up some bar width compared to my old grips, and they're a wee bit small at 31mm [34mm available], but those are my issues, not the fault of the grips.

    Unlike a fork's travel, the grips' "give" is in a different direction. If a rider's arms and weight were always perfectly aligned with every front-end impact, these grips would be useless. I think the grips help correct for these constant, unavoidable misalignments, and create a more FLUID rider/bike relationship (similar to the effect of float on clipless pedals).

  17. #17
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    I just got back in from my third ride with these ESI extra chunky's.

    At first they seem real fat and dense. But as time has progressed, the grips have almost contoured to my hand, making them way too comfy. Theres still alot of grip netween you and the bar as well. I want to keep riding now to see how long the comfort lasts, thats the real test, and Im hoping to get a 2-3 hour ride in soon.
    These ESI's are on my rigid 26" SS with aluminum bars mind you...and Im giggling cause my hands feel great. This is a very welcome change from the norm with me.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mariop View Post
    To the OP, good luck, try different things, and since it sounds like you really enjoy riding rigid, don't give up just yet.
    Mariop and aved nosam,

    thanks – feel bad for you guys though, as it sounds like you have it way worse than I do. Trying different components/setups out sounds like a plan. Thanks for helping me out on what's helped you! Riser bars are my favourite, so nothing will change there. Just as you say, feels like I'm more on my arse with them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryder1 View Post
    That's a lot of abuse and little rest.
    It actually sounds more/worse than it actually is. Short sessions, really varying exercises and so on – but good point nonetheless. And I see that you're saying with the suspension fork driving you to do 'more'. Also a good point.

    Don't think I'll grab a pair of those grips, but cool of you to give a short review.

  19. #19
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    So, I just wanted to say thanks for all the input and also update you with what's up. I've ordered Ergon GS1's and Giro DND gloves, which should come in early next week. Not the most padded gloves I know, but will be cool to try at least. Also cool to try out Ergon grips.

    I'll also try to change up my setup, see if any small changes makes any difference. A shorter stem might be needed. I've also talked to a friend, who's a physiotherapist – suggested I'd go for a week of NSAID (since the pain is quite 'new', like in the last five weeks). Will also try to slow down on the upper body workouts during this week.

    2.4 tires are also on the list, but will have to wait a while – I'm pretty psyched to try all of these things out.

    Again, big thanks for helping me out.

  20. #20
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    56 riding a rigid SS 29er for about the last 7 years. Had wrist pain for years from working out, cutting wood and other stuff. Been on 2.5 front tire tubeless for years, set at 18 psi. Ride very rocky terrain on almost every ride. Switched to ESI Chunky grips and a Ti bar with mega backsweep and my wrists are the least of my concerns from riding now.
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  21. #21
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    Maybe try a semi-ergo bar? I use a Salsa Bend 2 bar (17 or 18 degrees). Aluminum but unbelievably comfy to me with ESI Chunkies and doesn't have the weird handling that you can get from a full blown ergo styled bar. I'm also running 29+ now and that has made a major difference. Ergon Grips, lot of people love them. I don't like them at all but that's just me. Reach and the amount "if any" bar vs saddle drop can play a big role.....I'd go see a reputable bike fitter.

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  22. #22
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    azjonboy,

    sorry for the late reply. Looks like those Chunky grips are a favourite by a lot of people. And sounds interesting with a Ti bar as well. Fatter tires will be ordered later this fall!


    Flat Ark,

    thanks for the input – several good points in there. I've actually fiddled with my saddle angle recently, trying to shift my weight a bit more towards the rear. Will have to do a bit more tests though. And that Salsa bar doesn't look bad, not bad at all. Ergon grips have been ordered, so will try those out first.

  23. #23
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    Alright, so a quick update (and a thankful shoutout to those who helped me out).

    Two months later on, my wrist(s) are happy once again. The Ergon grips helped me out big time, especially the right wrist is much better. Riding my Steamroller – with 'normal' grips – I've come to realize how much I twist/turn my right arm/wrist in a painful angle. The Ergon grips really helps counteract that turning I have going on.

    Also got a 2.4 Ardent up front which helps smooth things out as well. I thought it wouldn't be that much of a difference, but I really like the meatier tire up front.


    Just wanted to give a big thanks to all that helped me out.

  24. #24
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    Good to hear!

    Also worth considering -- wearing wrist braces in your sleep. Helps me considerably and keeps my hands/wrists from sleeping at awkward angles.

  25. #25
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    Suspension fork will help a lot, stop gripping the bars so tightly (hold on loosely), Ergon grips made me grip tighter (but felt great tooling around parking lot, so they had to go), Lizard Skins Charger lock-on grips work for me, not too fat but have cushiony surface, good gloves (I mostly hate gel because it's more junk in the way of my grip), changed diet (less sugar because it's inflammatory). More stretching, little taichi, playing with fit, properly angle the brake levers for natural relaxed grip, larger tires, lower tire pressure all helped me. I've had wrist pain and recurrent tendonitis in the elbows that have played heck with MTB that I love. Sometimes gotta ride smoother trails or road bike a bit instead. I still ride rigid, just not as much as I'd like.

    I've had carpal tunnel, wore the wrist braces at night and changed jobs, and then it went away after awhile.

    Currently riding some generic aluminum low rise bars on one bike and Easton EA70 mid rise bars on my other mtb, they help (but gotta get the angles correct for you) some bars feel harsher than others. Those suspension grips look interesting and $100 is cheap if it can fix your pain problem. Good luck and keep us updated.
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  26. #26
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    Aching wrists = riding position problem.

    The optimum position for speed and power delivery is not necessarily the best for your joints.

    Your body has evolved to take its impacts through your legs, not your wrists, so I suggest the OP changes his riding position to a more upright one where there is very little weight on his hands.

    That should be the primary change, and it's probably urgent if he doesn't want to be crippled before he's in his forties.

    Other changes are palliative and not a cure, although they do help.

    Also I suggest looking at handlebar and stem combinations. I find a more sweptback bar is more comfortable for my wrists and also use dropbars a lot because the grips are parallel.

    Suspension may help, but shouldn't be considered before a more body friendly riding position is adopted. (I ride exclusively rigid and do 24 hour events and do not suffer discomfort and I'm quite ancient).
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  27. #27
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    Good stuff, Velobike, Natedogz and bolts.

    I'm not that bothered by finding exactly one solution to my problems, as I'm that dude that also believe that the body should move around – even while biking. Hate all you want, I'll still believe in it.

    Found a simple solution earlier, as just by lowering my saddle a bit helped a lot. Also, Ergon grips are friggin' ace. Bigger front tire has helped in giving a bit more cush, and lately I have really been into the idea of getting an even fatter front. Really think it would suit my riding style.

    I'm not bothered by my wrists in my everyday life, but I really got concerned earlier this fall. My mom (and other relatives) has got bad joints, so I won't be that surprised if I get some of that arthritic stuff as well.


    Again fellas. Thanks for the help and tips – really appreciate it.

  28. #28
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    I will second (or third?) the suggestion of trying some of the 'alt' bars with more sweep. I tried Ergons for a while, and while they felt really good for just cruising, they did not do so well when the trails got rough. I found I had to hold on really tight to avoid my hand slipping off the grip. I tried out a few high sweep bars and really like them, they just put your hands and wrists at a more natural comfortable position. I've paired that with ESI Extra Chunky grips and am really happy with the setup. I also run wide low pressure tires and carbon and titanium bars as well.

    If you start shopping for new bars and stems, stay away from the 35mm diameter stuff, it's designed to be as stiff as possible, not what you want here.

  29. #29
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    Velobike and Bikeny, what bars in particular (brand and model) have worked for you? I tried Mary alternative bars, worked great on mellow stuff, but when the speed picked up and the trail got burly, the didn't have enough control for me.
    Get off the couch and ride! :)

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz View Post
    Velobike and Bikeny, what bars in particular (brand and model) have worked for you? I tried Mary alternative bars, worked great on mellow stuff, but when the speed picked up and the trail got burly, the didn't have enough control for me.
    I'm always wary of recommending a specific bar because we are all different. (I use Mary bars or dropbars)

    There are a couple of points though.

    First always look at the bar and stem position rather than just the bar. If you put a swept back bar on the same stem you had your straight bars on, your hands are going to be further back. If that is better for you it may be because all you really needed was a shorter stem rather than the swept back angle.

    Second I've always used the "pencil" guide for determining how much sweep back. Grip a pencil in each hand as if it was a handlebar. Relax, let your hands dangle, then lean forward to the angle your body is at when on the bike. With your eyes closed raise your hands to their approximate positions on the bike while keeping your wrists relaxed but not dangling. Now check what angles your hands are at. That is a very rough guide (but has many flaws).

    Straight bars were not designed for ergonomic reasons. Because handlebar stems were not strong enough to resist the twisting forces on a handlebar when riding on the rough the answer was to use a straight bar which had no leverage to twist it out of position. The straighter the bar, the more unnatural the angle of the wrists for most people.
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  31. #31
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    Keep most of your weight on your pedals, not your hands - keep your hands light on the bar as much as possible.

    I rode rigid for several years but gave it up for a Reba and haven't looked back. But when I was rolling rigid I ran a Jones Loop bar, positioned about even with the saddle, FWIW. Also, ran Maxxis Ardent 2.4's tubeless on Stan's Flow rims.

    Good luck.

  32. #32
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    Swept bars will make the biggest difference. Answer 20/20 are my favorite.

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