horizontal dropout position- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. horizontal dropout position

    Hello,

    i've got a question about replacing my vertical dropouts by horizontal dropouts. I want to make horizontal dropouts but don't know for sure how to place them. In the drawing you can see what mean. Are horizontal dropouts realy horizontal? is there a kind of a little angle (angle a?) to prevent the wheel slipping forward?
    The seccond question is where should i place the beginning of the "slot". I think this is just a matter of looking to the brakes and the wheel clearance in the frame??


    With some help of Babel Fish
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    Last edited by gijsberg; 08-16-2006 at 02:25 AM.
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    Gijs, from the mountain

  2. #2
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    some information founded

    Found this image of Rivendell's Quickbeam dropout:
    and the explanation of why

    Not shure if it works like that... anyone some ideas about the (non) horizontal dropouts?
    ---------------------------
    Gijs, from the mountain

  3. #3
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by gijsberg
    Hello,

    i've got a question about replacing my vertical dropouts by horizontal dropouts. I want to make horizontal dropouts but don't know for sure how to place them. In the drawing you can see what mean. Are horizontal dropouts realy horizontal? is there a kind of a little angle (angle a?) to prevent the wheel slipping forward?
    The seccond question is where should i place the beginning of the "slot". I think this is just a matter of looking to the brakes and the wheel clearance in the frame??


    With some help of Babel Fish
    Think about when you put the widest tire on your wheel and in your frame. If you put the dropout too far forward, then it may not be as useful because the tire may hit the chainstays.

    BTW, here's a good looking example of a dropout replacement.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  4. #4
    www.badgercycles.com
    Reputation: robpennell's Avatar
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    I dont know if there is really a standard for Hoz dropout angle. I generally keep the slot in plane with the chainstay. Sometimes I will adjust that a little depending on frame size so the seatstays flow into the dropouts better.

    Your sort of handcuffed on where you can locate the dropout. Once you have cut out the old dropouts you can only work with what you have unless you do a new rear triangle. Everything may need to move forward a little depending on what you are cutting out and which Hoz dropout you will be installing.

  5. #5
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    You want to make sure you check your brake posts too if you run v's. I had horizontal dropouts put on last year and never thought of even checking that. When I went to put my brakes back on I couldn't get the pads to adjust low enough to get to the rims. Granted it wasn't a shop that put them on so the dropouts sat a little lower than the old vertical dropouts. I was running avid's, so maybe if you have Paul or something with a little more adjustability you might not have a problem. If you run disc's than that wouldn't be an issue. Just a thought.

  6. #6
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    I am going to make my own dropouts out of "normal" steel with a discgrinder an mig/mag weld them to the vert dropouts
    this is a picture of the bike.

    bigger photo
    Think i put the beginning of the slot a cm in front of the original hole and make the slot long enough.

    This is the drawing of my plan, still doubting about the angle...
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    ---------------------------
    Gijs, from the mountain

  7. #7
    75% Mountain cycle
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    You may not need to weld anything

    Here are some other folks that have gotten by with a simple dremel / file to the dropouts to get the adjustment they need.

    You may have an appropriate gear ratio close.
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  8. #8
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    Okay, that could be a sollution but i don't want to choose a other gear ratio or buy other cogs, so i think i need to dremel a lot without changing the dropouts..
    ---------------------------
    Gijs, from the mountain

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    angle them dropouts / trackends

    Quote Originally Posted by gijsberg
    Not shure if it works like that... anyone some ideas about the (non) horizontal dropouts?
    It is a nice option if you plan on running a rear rim brake. Rivendell is on the right track. Not having to change the brakepad positions when you flip the wheel or switch gearing is the best.

    Old road bikes are great with their forward facing angled dropouts.

    It does reduce your effectve gear range unless you go wicked long like the track ends on the Quickbeam.

    good luck

  10. #10
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    I recently found the "frameforum" and asked the same question. a answer:
    Traditional track bikes have drop outs oriented so the slot is horizontal to the ground so changing chain length won't change the trail.In practice, I don't think anybody can really tell the difference.
    ---------------------------
    Gijs, from the mountain

  11. #11
    Hoopy Frood
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    Instead of grinding your own and welding them on, you could just buy some pre-made and weld them on:

    http://www.surlybikes.com/parts/frameparts_pop.html

    or, if you prefer sliders:

    http://www.paragonmachineworks.com/
    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it. - Thomas Jefferson

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