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  1. #1
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    High humidity!!!

    How do you guys ride in high humidity? I've been singlespeeding for 3 years in CO, MT and WY with lots of climbing. I am currently in Minnesota and have a hard time riding over 6 miles, just feel zapped. I've been hydrating and using salt stick chewables during rides but still the same and I'm running the same 32-20 I run in the mountains, what's the secret?

  2. #2
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    htfu

    Yeah, high humidity will do that. I guess you get conditioned to it to some degree (?) I don't bother with salt.

    Curious just how high the humidity is there (because I might laugh at you).
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  3. #3
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    It was around 95% this morning, I'm used to 10-20% in the summer.

  4. #4
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    Secret is skipping the summer...
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    ... and if we just ...

    Ugghh... I spent my first 24 years in N.J. and all I knew was heat with humidity. been in Socal for 16 years and don't miss it. Today it's in the high 80's and dry. Not even running my AC. I don't know if there is a secret. Just drink as much as you can handle i guess. In my experience the Mid-West has the highest summer time humidity in the states. When it's all you know you just deal with it. Good luck and be safe

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    Thanks, I'll try to make the best of it while I'm here.

  7. #7
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    I guess just growing up in an area that has high humidity just makes you more immune to it. I'm in WV and while it's not Florida humid...it gets pretty nasty. We see 70's and 80's a lot. Sometimes 90's. Right now it's low in the 50's because it's been raining the last three days. But when it's higher and once I start riding and get a little breeze going...I'm generally ok.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelcaro View Post
    It was around 95% this morning, I'm used to 10-20% in the summer.
    I actually screen shot my phone on Friday for another thread so I can relate.

    High humidity!!!-95_percent.png

    I went running that morning but at 95%, I took it easy, took some photos and only did 3 miles, drinking 20 oz of water. It hadn't been quite that high here and I noticed it drops off into the 60s later in the day so I have been debating if it would be better with higher temp (as in upper 80s/lower 90s) with a lower humidity rather than the high 70s with the really high humidity.

    I think you do get used to it some but it is definitely draining. It is really nice out right now, hope it will be tomorrow morning when I ride.
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  9. #9
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    The real problem with humidity and any kind of activity isn't that you're losing more water than normal (ie you need extra hydration) the problem is your sweat doesn't evaporate. While this lends to the illusion you're sweating more, the real problem is you aren't cooling off because that's why you sweat - it evaporates, and that cools you off. If you aren't wearing technical fabrics designed to make evaporation easier, try that. Not stuff designed to get the sweat off of you, stuff designed to aid air flow. I think I'd like your conditions there though. High humidity tends to be a bit related to what you're used to.

    I grew up in central VA, but now live in middle TN. I was back in VA last week, and everyone was dying because of the heat and humidity, but I didn't think it was too bad - a couple of days I actually thought it was really nice. Anyhow, try the really light weight breathable fabrics, move fast enough to create a breeze, and pay attention to your body. If you need to stop, stop.

  10. #10
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    Took it a lot easier today(no hammering) lasted a little longer but ended up feeling the same as other rides. The salt stick seems to help a little, will try riding late evenings to see if that's better than the morning humidity.

  11. #11
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    Having grown up in MN and not moved away I guess I'm just used to it. My advice is to acclimate to the summer instead of running into or out of the AC spaces all the time. My current office is in a greenhouse, so we go outside to cool off. When I was in a lab space I spent a few minutes in a cold room after my commute in the morning. I felt like I was always hot once I returned to the great outdoors. Also, I do agree with Cotharyus that the issue is that the system doesn't work in high humidity. Sweat can't evaporate if the ambient air is already saturated. So, on those really humid days it is better to bike a little slower and enjoy the air movement as you ride. Honestly, it isn't the pedaling so much as the stopping. You can also ride at the beginning or end of the day when it's a little cooler. A last resort is a piece of frozen cabbage/lettuce in the hat, always a tried and true baseball trick.
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  12. #12
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    I guess you haven't been to very many places if you consider MN to be humid. I grew up in MN and we moved back 5 years ago after 28 years away while I was in the military. Sure, there are humid days, and the humidity is usually highest in the morning. But it doesn't touch the Gulf Coast or a few other places I've been overseas. Don't worry, the humidity will be gone soon and be replaced by snow and freezing/sub zero temps.


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  13. #13
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    Yes, you get used to it. I lived in WI where it can get rather humid... and here in Chicago, it gets humid as well. Lots of water Helen. Waaaawaaaaaa Helen.

  14. #14
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    Start fully hydrated, and stay on top of it. I spend a large portion of my waking hours outdoors at work or play, and am about as acclimated as it gets. This time of year, I go through a lot of Gatorade bottles and mix, along with Medi-Lyte electrolyte tablets plus snacks, and pretty much feel great. Try a thin/silkweight long sleeve synthetic instead of a T. I'm finding that keeps me noticeably cooler, even though my riding is under 100% tree cover in relatively high humidity, and most people think of long sleeves in terms of sun protection.
    Are you eating? Getting plenty of carbs before and during your rides?

    Coming from CO, MT and WY, I can imagine part of the problem for you is just breathing in higher humidity, plus sweating a lot more due to lack of evaporative cooling. Reverse has been true for me when I go from the Southeast to Southwest, and backpack in CO, UT and CA. I LOVE going out West. Love the air, and the huge range of temperatures I can be comfortable in the same clothes. Coming back to Alabama's "temperate" climate after a week or two of that is a rude awakening, because the hot and cold feel so much hotter and colder. I sweat more hiking here in the 60s than I did in CA at 100F, but when things cool off, I need a fleece jacket standing around in temps that I was ok at wearing a t-shirt in low humidity. Humidity really is a huge factor when it comes to both comfort and performance, and one I think is often overlooked.

  15. #15
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    I've been trying to keep up hydration with Gatorade and nuun tabs, I will give the long sleeve a try. There's a front coming in this week and dropping the temps quite a bit which helps.

  16. #16
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    It was 95*F and 74% humidity at 9:30am in PHX, according to my phone. It didn't stop me from riding, but F me it was gross.

    I'll take 115* and dry any time.
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  17. #17
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    You all do know that you are sweating just as much when the air is dry. It just evaporates quickly, making it seem like you're not. Keeping hydrated is just as important.


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    HAhahahahaha Sorry, have to laugh at you guys from that region on the east of the Rockies, it's so dry that a lot of the benefits of altitude are almost completely lost when you visit someplace with serious humidity and heat. As to what to do, can't help you, down here is always hot and humid and have just learned to deal with it, only way to get accustomed to it is to live and ride in it, just like when we sea levelers come to altitude, although it seems that being relatively fit and accustomed to the high humidity and heat helps at altitude more than the reverse situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Angelcaro View Post
    How do you guys ride in high humidity? I've been singlespeeding for 3 years in CO, MT and WY with lots of climbing. I am currently in Minnesota and have a hard time riding over 6 miles, just feel zapped. I've been hydrating and using salt stick chewables during rides but still the same and I'm running the same 32-20 I run in the mountains, what's the secret?
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  19. #19
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    I'm in NY, and this time of year gets VERY humid and hot. There is certainly some acclimatization that happens the more you are exposed to it. As somebody else mentioned, hanging out most of the day in really cold AC will not help you. Embrace the heat and humidity! If you must run the AC, don't set it to 65 degrees, set it to 75 or something. But there is no way around getting really sweaty and hot when riding in these conditions. Here are some strategies that I've employed to help stay cool:

    Ride early or late when the temps are cooler and the sun is not as hot and direct.

    Take it a bit slower. Ever wonder why everyone down south moves a bit slower??

    Ditch the Camelbak/backpack and use water bottles instead. The pack will keep you hotter and sweatier.

    Freeze water bottles or use LOTS of ice in them. Also invest in a couple of insulated bottles. For a short ride I'll take one bottle, stuff it with as much ice as possible and then top off with water. If I'm riding longer, I'll take 2 or 3 bottles and freeze one or two so they stay cold longer. When you get to the top of that hill panting, dripping and on the verge of overheating, some ice cold water does wonders!

    Choose trails with gentler and shorter climbs, as well as ones that have more shade. Although the shade can backfire sometimes, as the trees can block a breeze if there happens to be one.

    I think that's it.

    Good luck!

  20. #20
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    Don't mess around and think you're just being weak. Humidity can be dangerous. Check out this chart on heat exhaustion/stroke temperature and humidity:
    ATMO336 - Fall 2014

    Last summer, I went out for a ride in 85 degree weather & 85-90% humidity, started feeling clumsy and weak got disoriented and couldn't find my way back to my car (these were trails I rode every week). I could not cool down and my heart rate was not slowing. Flagged down another rider and asked for help, he got me back to my car, I drank a lot of cool water and felt better after 15-20 minutes in air conditioning (hear rate back to normal, head clearer). Drove myself to hospital, they diagnosed heat exhaustion, noted that I was not dehydrated, sent me home with instructions to rest and drink lots of clear liquids.

    If you're feeling overheated, slow down, pour cold water on yourself, take it a bit easier. You're body can eventually acclimate to most heat/humidity, but it takes time. The USA Track and Field put out this advice in 2011, seems logical, but keep in mind, this was for athletes in peak condition, so adjust as needed.

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    I do think a big part of it is allowing yourself to get acclimated to the change. I saw the post about a dew point of 20. I've never ridden in air that dry when it's not 18 degrees. I'm sure I would struggle in that. When Summer roles around here we hit the trails early, hydrate starting once we wake up, and begin the ride slow. We plan rides flexible enough to go as hard as we can given the temp and humidity. I'll still ride hard and climb but I have learned to keep track of how I'm feeling. I don't go hard out of the gate.

  22. #22
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    That's a normal to cooler day down here. Good advice. Always amazes me when people come down here and tell me they're fit, did this race and that race, at altitude to boot etc, etc, and then when they get out in our heat how all that fitness and endurance fades so fast.

    Quote Originally Posted by dompedro3 View Post
    Don't mess around and think you're just being weak. Humidity can be dangerous. Check out this chart on heat exhaustion/stroke temperature and humidity:
    ATMO336 - Fall 2014

    Last summer, I went out for a ride in 85 degree weather & 85-90% humidity, started feeling clumsy and weak got disoriented and couldn't find my way back to my car (these were trails I rode every week). I could not cool down and my heart rate was not slowing. Flagged down another rider and asked for help, he got me back to my car, I drank a lot of cool water and felt better after 15-20 minutes in air conditioning (hear rate back to normal, head clearer). Drove myself to hospital, they diagnosed heat exhaustion, noted that I was not dehydrated, sent me home with instructions to rest and drink lots of clear liquids.

    If you're feeling overheated, slow down, pour cold water on yourself, take it a bit easier. You're body can eventually acclimate to most heat/humidity, but it takes time. The USA Track and Field put out this advice in 2011, seems logical, but keep in mind, this was for athletes in peak condition, so adjust as needed.
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    Yep, you need to slow way down. I bet you are pushing the pace in the humidity. That'll wear you down fast!

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    Yep i seem to start out pretty hard sometimes and its downhill from there, up in the mountains i can go hard all day and repeat that almost daily and do just fine but here I've been humbled by the heat/humidity.

  25. #25
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    Acclimate? Maybe. I spent my first 30 years in swampy D.C. and always despised the humidity. I moved to dry Phoenix in 2001 and immediately preferred the hot-but-dry climate.

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMN View Post
    You all do know that you are sweating just as much when the air is dry. It just evaporates quickly, making it seem like you're not. Keeping hydrated is just as important.
    Yep. And don't you lose more water via respiration in low humidity, and at higher altitudes? I can't imagine the risk of dehydration is worse in MN than CO.

    I think the problem with high humidity is sweating isn't as effective (less evaporative cooling) so your core body temp creeps up.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMN View Post
    You all do know that you are sweating just as much when the air is dry. It just evaporates quickly, making it seem like you're not. Keeping hydrated is just as important.

    There's actually some debate about this. I'm not a doctor, so I don't know, but just FYI, the other side of the debate is you sweat more in high humidity because it's less effective at cooling you off, so your body works harder (ie sweats more) to cool you off. The flip side is when the air is dry you start to lose more fluids to the air as you breathe. I'm not really sure where/if it all balances out but I do know this: No matter where you are, you're pretty much screwed if you don't drink enough.

  27. #27
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    I vary much hydration model depending on how far and how hard I plan on riding.

    Quick spin (1 hour or less): Just some water in a bottle
    Medium ride (1-2 hours): Some gatorade in a bottle and a Camelbak were I have frozen the water in the bladder so it cools from both the outside and the inside.
    Longer ride (2-4 hours): I switch from gatorade to Nuun tablets (or similar) and still use the frozen Camelbak.
    Long ride: (more than 4 hours): Still Nuun (with spare tablets to refill bottle), frozen water, salt tablets every hour and take some banana to get Potassium in and some other easy to digest food to keep the calories.

    Personally energy gels make me feel sick which is why I pack a little food.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMN View Post
    You all do know that you are sweating just as much when the air is dry. It just evaporates quickly, making it seem like you're not.
    Second sentence both contradicts the first and explains why it's completely false. Irony is ironic...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    Second sentence both contradicts the first and explains why it's completely false. Irony is ironic...
    Let me reword it. You are losing fluids from your body either way. I spent time in Saudi Arabia when I was in the USAF. So I am familiar with dry heat. You might not have a shirt soaked in sweat, but your body is losing fluids that need to be replaced.

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  30. #30
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    It is in force for months around the DC/MD/VA the Mid Atlantic region.

    I churn a bit slower on the hot and humid days. Did 50+ miles of gravel grind and climbing on Sunday and ended up soaking wet in the 1st half hour.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMN View Post
    Let me reword it.
    I'm not arguing with you.
    It doesn't matter how you word it; it's not subjective.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    I'm not arguing with you.
    It doesn't matter how you word it; it's not subjective.
    Not sure what you're getting at. Are you trying to say you don't sweat as much when the humidity is lower? I think MarkMN is spot on.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    I'm not arguing with you.
    It doesn't matter how you word it; it's not subjective.
    Oh, sorry. I'm not understanding what you're getting at?

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny View Post
    Not sure what you're getting at. Are you trying to say you don't sweat as much when the humidity is lower?
    I'm not "trying" to say anything. Like I said, it's not subjective. Unless you're not human, or operate under a different set of physical laws from the rest of us, that's the way it is.
    You either get effective cooling from your sweat through evaporation, which is your body's primary method of lowering its temperature, or you don't. And when high humidity denies you evaporative cooling, your body's only option is to sweat more, and to keep sweating more and more, because it's not cooling down. So you lose, and need to replace, more fluids(and electrolytes). A lot more, because it's a continuous process.

    Google it. I'm sure there's plenty of tech articles that take a page or 10 to say the same thing

  35. #35
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    I'm in FL, where it's 90 degrees and 90% humidity almost every day during this time of year.

    I don't find it appealing to ride in those conditions.

    So I usually just ride at night.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    I'm not "trying" to say anything. Like I said, it's not subjective. Unless you're not human, or operate under a different set of physical laws from the rest of us, that's the way it is.
    You either get effective cooling from your sweat through evaporation, which is your body's primary method of lowering its temperature, or you don't. And when high humidity denies you evaporative cooling, your body's only option is to sweat more, and to keep sweating more and more, because it's not cooling down. So you lose, and need to replace, more fluids(and electrolytes). A lot more, because it's a continuous process.

    Google it. I'm sure there's plenty of tech articles that take a page or 10 to say the same thing
    I agree with you on that. I'm just trying to stress that a person does sweat in a dry climate. When I've biked, or hunted, or fished or worked outside in hot dry conditions I might not have a sweaty shirt, but I have a lot of dried salts on my skin from the evaporated sweat. And it is much easier to not think you are not losing fluids because you aren't seeing the sweat. As to the amount of fluids lost thru sweat it's probably more in a humid climate, I agree. But you are also losing fluids other ways in a dry climate. Bottom line is to keep hydrated.

    And to get back to the OP, acclimate yourself to where you are. I spend a lot of time outside in MN be it thru work or play and I don't have a problem dealing with the summers here. Enjoy the summer while it's here!

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMN View Post
    in hot dry conditions I might not have a sweaty shirt, but I have a lot of dried salts on my skin from the evaporated sweat. And it is much easier to not think you are not losing fluids because you aren't seeing the sweat. As to the amount of fluids lost thru sweat it's probably more in a humid climate, I agree. But you are also losing fluids other ways in a dry climate.
    I think MarkMN's point is valid, that people commonly mistake being covered in sweat for sweating way more, while people in dry climates underestimate their fluid/electrolyte needs. High humidity motivates you drink like crazy, so I'd guess you'd see fewer reports of dehydration in humid climates (people here in Phoenix are constantly being rescued for dehydration and/or heat exhaustion).

    If it's more humid, and your body heats up more, you may sweat a little more, but I couldn't find evidence that it was *that* much more than in hot/dry weather. Meanwhile, water loss through respiration apparently negates the difference (more or less), especially if you're exercising (heavy breathing). Like Cotharyus said, I don't know where all this balances out (my guess: it makes little difference), but I suspect individual differences play a significant factor. I'd also think doing high-quality testing of these variables would be challenging. Please post if you're aware of good studies.

  38. #38
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    If it's humid, sweating doesn't cool me off because the sweat doesn't evaporate. Instead it forms an oily mess that holds the heat in.

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  39. #39
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    Yep, the humidity acts as insulator. Studies have shown that core body temp is a quicker detriment to performance than level of hydration. Not saying hydration is not important (I'm a cramper, so I know all about 'lytes and hydration), but the heat will rob your performance quickly. Like everything else, just have to do it a little "less."

  40. #40
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    Also, in dry climates, while riding a bike, the evaporative cooling effect is even more so, because as your moving on the bike the wind is in your face.

    I both bike and run. When I run in warm dry weather I really notice the evaporation difference and feel like I need to drink more.

    I think riding the bike can trick you into thinking you don't need to drink as much which makes it even more deadly. Because you can always feel cool and dry.

  41. #41
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    Update: I had been working in the heat all day for the last 6 weeks, just this past week i started working indoors and last weekend went riding and did not feel the same effects and was able to to multiple laps each ride with no problems and tripled my distance on one trail. I think hard physical work in the heat combined with riding all weekend didn't let my body recover and now that I'm indoors my body ain't as stressed.

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