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  1. #1
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    help on a new SS for a new guy

    All right fella interested in getting my first mountain bike and was dead set on a rockhopper that was gonna cost me over a grand. But the more and more I research these ss bikes really intrigue me. I want something that will challenge me in the trails and something that will get me in shape mainly cardiovascular. I know absolutely next to nothing about ss mountain bikes so I need your help. I uwould like it to be very light so I'm thinking a rigid fork and I want to pay the least amount of dough for the best possible bike. Can you good fellas point me in the right direction? Oh and ill mention I'm 32 to 5 ft 11 and 200lbs if that matters. Oh yeah I wild want something new and already built. Thanks in advance. Oh yeah...ill still be able to ride trails right?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by das028 View Post
    All right fella interested in getting my first mountain bike and was dead set on a rockhopper that was gonna cost me over a grand. But the more and more I research these ss bikes really intrigue me. I want something that will challenge me in the trails and something that will get me in shape mainly cardiovascular. I know absolutely next to nothing about ss mountain bikes so I need your help. I uwould like it to be very light so I'm thinking a rigid fork and I want to pay the least amount of dough for the best possible bike. Can you good fellas point me in the right direction? Oh and ill mention I'm 32 to 5 ft 11 and 200lbs if that matters. Oh yeah I wild want something new and already built. Thanks in advance. Oh yeah...ill still be able to ride trails right?
    Well there are options out there for under a grand for sure. If you want to be challenged, SS is the way to go. Try 32/16 ratio!! I can't say I know the weights of the various frames or complete bikes out there, most are around 5lbs/frame or 30lbs/bike, give or take?

    The redline monocog is very popular, around $500-$600 complete, the kona unit is just under $1000, then there is the surly 1x1, surly karate monkey, vassago jabberwocky, the list goes on. Your best bet is to go down to the LBS and take some test rides. And yes, you will be able to ride trails!!!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by das028 View Post
    Any thoughts on a Raleigh XXIX?
    Can't say I know anything about the raleigh but I have read that the guys who own them approve

  4. #4
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    Any thoughts on a Raleigh XXIX?

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    I'm really happy with my XXIX though it's only lighter than a sherman tank. It's a bit like the Monocog except it has an eccentric bb and avid bb5 disk brakes. The newer models use a belt drive instead of a chain-best to ask people who have ridden a belt drive. That said, fun bike that handles well, is affordable, and comfortable.

  6. #6
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    If you do ride SS, you'll die by the time you turn 33. If you can't start using punctuation, maybe before.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth View Post
    If you do ride SS, you'll die by the time you turn 33. If you can't start using punctuation, maybe before.
    I don't get your joke? Are you implying that I'm old there youngster? Lol. That might of been kinda funny but the punctuation joke is kinda tired. You can do better then that sugar tits!

  8. #8
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    Redline Monocog's are the bomb.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenlimo View Post
    Redline Monocog's are the bomb.
    Do they com with disc brakes?

  10. #10
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    If your not worried about buying new shop around and get something that's stock or upgraded and save some dough. I just recently bought a nice used haro Mary that's has some upgrades done to it and have spent under 500 on it so far. I love it and it's pretty light. Good luck with the shopping

  11. #11
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    Can't go wrong with a Kona Unit at about a grand. Probably find one on sale this time of the year.

  12. #12
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    This is your first bike and your going to start with a rigid SS? Your learning curve is going to be veeery steep.
    I started a buddy out on a SS after he had been off the bike for 10+years. He had a terrible time in the beginning, the endurance and stamina needed was just too much.

  13. #13
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    If you're after something light an aluminum frame may be your answer. Though on a rigid SS I would gladly accept the weight penalty of a good steel frame. Check out the Misfit Dissent AL.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by can't get right View Post
    This is your first bike and your going to start with a rigid SS? Your learning curve is going to be veeery steep.
    I started a buddy out on a SS after he had been off the bike for 10+years. He had a terrible time in the beginning, the endurance and stamina needed was just too much.
    I get your point, but the endurance and stamina factor is exactly the reason i want a SS. That and I tend to go with the KISS theory. Plus I tend to tinker alot, and with the surly I'll have the option to add things like gears, suspension fork, etc... Im not entirely sold on the surly though. I like the redline and the raleigh as well. The raleigh will be a bit cheaper as well.

    The thing is with the redline and the surly I can pay an extra $100 or so and get the rockhopper i was looking at. Really I just cant mack up my mind

  15. #15
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    I'm riding a 2010 Rockhopper SL Comp 29er SS. I've really liked it, and have given it some abuse. If your looking for something light the rockhopper I'm riding weighed in at 24lbs at my house (but it's a 21" large). I'm assuming you'd pull off a Medium, so that would be a little lighter.

    Single Speed is awesome by the way, it will make you a strong rider and challenge you. Also, it's a great workout if that's what your looking for.

  16. #16
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    Redline Monocog Flight, or the Kona Unit, would be my choices..owned both.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  17. #17
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    Hmm choices, choices....

  18. #18
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    I have a Salsa El Mariachi now, had a Niner SIR9 before, and before that I had a Redline Monocog. The El Mar and SIR9 are out of your price range but the Monocog is not. Its not light though. Good riding bike, not stellar, but its inexpensive and will get you rolling right away. You can always upgrade it later to a suspension fork when you've had enough of the A$% whipping your hands are going to take on a ridgid.

    Anyway, whatever you decide, have fun with it. That's what Single Speeds are about...having fun. They fall right into the KISS category you mention.

    By the way...I highly recommend steel for a ridgid single speed!
    "...quit hitting me with your hammer"
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    Niner EMD 1x10 ~ Niner SIR9 SS ~ Cannondale Scalpel Si

  19. #19
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    I'll be the contrarian here. I think you should go with the geared bike first. You might get frustrated if you don't have the skills or stamina for dirt riding. When you feel up to it, get a chain tensioner, cog, spacers and try SS.
    I was lucky enough to buy a hardly used KHS solo one 1x9 of Craigslist. Rode that for a few months, then left it in one cog in the back, then rode it that way for a month. Finally, I took the geared stuff off and set it up SS.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by allroy71 View Post
    I'll be the contrarian here. I think you should go with the geared bike first. You might get frustrated if you don't have the skills or stamina for dirt riding. When you feel up to it, get a chain tensioner, cog, spacers and try SS.
    I was lucky enough to buy a hardly used KHS solo one 1x9 of Craigslist. Rode that for a few months, then left it in one cog in the back, then rode it that way for a month. Finally, I took the geared stuff off and set it up SS.
    I'm going to agree with Allroy here. das028- I'm you exact height, weight, and age. Before I started biking I was in amazing shape, running/sprinting/ HIIT burpees and doing tons of olympic lifts combined with gymnastics body weight exercises. When I first started riding (on a geared bike) I was amazed at how good of a work out it was and there were plenty of climbs that just kicked my ass.

    after about 3 months of 5-6 day a week riding my fitness was at a good level and I decided to switch to Single Speed. It kicked my ass more than initially riding the geared bike did- and I thought I now had great mountain bike fitness.

    So maybe you are one of those guys who can start out on an SS and do it without having a heart attack. But if you question your fitness in the slightest don't start off on a SS. At 5'11 and 200 pounds you are either loaded with muscle or you aren't very active. If it is the later just get a cheap geared bike from your LBS, ride till your fitness is there, and then switch to SS.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelscott View Post
    I'm going to agree with Allroy here. das028- I'm you exact height, weight, and age. Before I started biking I was in amazing shape, running/sprinting/ HIIT burpees and doing tons of olympic lifts combined with gymnastics body weight exercises. When I first started riding (on a geared bike) I was amazed at how good of a work out it was and there were plenty of climbs that just kicked my ass.

    after about 3 months of 5-6 day a week riding my fitness was at a good level and I decided to switch to Single Speed. It kicked my ass more than initially riding the geared bike did- and I thought I now had great mountain bike fitness.

    So maybe you are one of those guys who can start out on an SS and do it without having a heart attack. But if you question your fitness in the slightest don't start off on a SS. At 5'11 and 200 pounds you are either loaded with muscle or you aren't very active. If it is the later just get a cheap geared bike from your LBS, ride till your fitness is there, and then switch to SS.
    Well I definitely haven't made up my mind yet. I also really appreciate your replies. Very honest, and that's why I came to this forum for advice. I'll definitely consider your reply. I want to say that I am not a out of shape guy. I dont have much body fat, and tend to be more explosive rather then good stamina. This is the reason I was leaning toward a ss, to increase my stamina and cardio. I've been a grappler and trained Bhutan for the last 4 years but due to my fathers illness I cannot really train anymore. I haven't been working out for the last four months so I am getting a bit soft. Maybe I'm wrong but I thought riding a nice ss bike daily would keep me in the shape I want to be in. I figured I can stay away from trails that would give me trouble as a beginner and ease into the tuff stuff as I get better. I'm interested in a ss because of its simplicity and its platform that would be easy to upgrade/add components. But I gotta say some of you are making it sound like as a beginner I can't handle the stamina needed to ride trails on a ss.

  22. #22
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    I was out of riding for about a decade. When I got back into it this past summer I bought a Windsor SS 29'er for just under $500 and started riding daily. I have a bunch of friends who ride all the time and said I'd have to drop off rides and wouldn't be able to keep up and would hate it so much I'd sell it for something geared inside of 3 months. The exact opposite has been true. I love SS riding. In fact, after the second month I jumped the gearing from 32/18 to 42/18 and have never regreted it.

    I work harder, crank harder, stand more, sweat more and breathe harder than they do but I never drop and they rarely slow down for me. Sure, I lag from time to time, particularly big hills or steep trail sections but when I catch up, and I always catch up, I have the satisfaction of knowing that everything I got came from my own testicular fortitude and not from a granny gear.

    Oh, and when I got back into riding in May I was 5'11, 325 lbs. Now 6 months later I'm 5'11, 285 lbs and falling. The moral of this little soliloquy is, don't believe everything you read or hear, if you want a SS get one. Be aware it will be hard and it'll hurt sometimes but I guarantee it'll be worth it in the end.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borch View Post
    I was out of riding for about a decade. When I got back into it this past summer I bought a Windsor SS 29'er for just under $500 and started riding daily. I have a bunch of friends who ride all the time and said I'd have to drop off rides and wouldn't be able to keep up and would hate it so much I'd sell it for something geared inside of 3 months. The exact opposite has been true. I love SS riding. In fact, after the second month I jumped the gearing from 32/18 to 42/18 and have never regreted it.

    I work harder, crank harder, stand more, sweat more and breathe harder than they do but I never drop and they rarely slow down for me. Sure, I lag from time to time, particularly big hills or steep trail sections but when I catch up, and I always catch up, I have the satisfaction of knowing that everything I got came from my own testicular fortitude and not from a granny gear.

    Oh, and when I got back into riding in May I was 5'11, 325 lbs. Now 6 months later I'm 5'11, 285 lbs and falling. The moral of this little soliloquy is, don't believe everything you read or hear, if you want a SS get one. Be aware it will be hard and it'll hurt sometimes but I guarantee it'll be worth it in the end.
    Appreciate the encouragement buddy! And congrats on the weight loss keep it up!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by das028 View Post
    Well I definitely haven't made up my mind yet. I also really appreciate your replies. Very honest, and that's why I came to this forum for advice. I'll definitely consider your reply. I want to say that I am not a out of shape guy. I dont have much body fat, and tend to be more explosive rather then good stamina. This is the reason I was leaning toward a ss, to increase my stamina and cardio. I've been a grappler and trained Bhutan for the last 4 years but due to my fathers illness I cannot really train anymore. I haven't been working out for the last four months so I am getting a bit soft. Maybe I'm wrong but I thought riding a nice ss bike daily would keep me in the shape I want to be in. I figured I can stay away from trails that would give me trouble as a beginner and ease into the tuff stuff as I get better. I'm interested in a ss because of its simplicity and its platform that would be easy to upgrade/add components. But I gotta say some of you are making it sound like as a beginner I can't handle the stamina needed to ride trails on a ss.
    No one can really tell you exactly what is going to work for you. We can just give general advice based off of what we have encountered.

    I mean- on one hand I can say "oh this dude is a fighter. He'll train hard and meet the fitness level easy."

    On the other hand- I can say "This guy hasn't exercised in 4 months. He doesn't have the fitness or the discipline to set up even a base line exercise routine to keep his fitness level good."

    If you know yourself, and you know you'll struggle through the pain and make it work, then go for it. I just think the fitness level required to ride even a geared bike requires way more than what most people have and requires way more discipline then most people have. SSing is harder then geared bike riding- requires even more fitness and discipline.

    If you think you got what it takes then go for it. But don't kid yourself, you'll just waste money and burn out on riding.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelscott View Post
    No one can really tell you exactly what is going to work for you. We can just give general advice based off of what we have encountered.

    I mean- on one hand I can say "oh this dude is a fighter. He'll train hard and meet the fitness level easy."

    On the other hand- I can say "This guy hasn't exercised in 4 months. He doesn't have the fitness or the discipline to set up even a base line exercise routine to keep his fitness level good."

    If you know yourself, and you know you'll struggle through the pain and make it work, then go for it. I just think the fitness level required to ride even a geared bike requires way more than what most people have and requires way more discipline then most people have. SSing is harder then geared bike riding- requires even more fitness and discipline.

    If you think you got what it takes then go for it. But don't kid yourself, you'll just waste money and burn out on riding.
    I appreciate your advice and ill definitely keep that in mind when choosing a bike

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