Help me with diggle gearing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Help me with diggle gearing

    I'm building up a on one inbred 26 that will serve commuter duty with occasional use as a SS mtb. I'm currently running a geared 26" commuter, but i spend all my time in 44x12, and would be fine if that was my only gear on my 13 mile commute. Is there a ratio that would make sense for mtb SS duty that would let me use the same chain? I don't really know what SS mtb gear would be appropriate, as i haven't really done any SS mtb riding. I appreciate your wisdom!
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  2. #2
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
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    - http://eehouse.org/fixin/formfmu.php...ey=Stay_length

    Doesn't look entirely likely without breaking the chain.

    However..

    -If you use two powerlinks, with the appropriate length of chain in between, it wont take more than a few seconds to reduce your chain length or add those links back in

    EDIT:: Wait, my bad. the inbred has sliding dropouts. Yes, you will almost definitely be able to get something to work. add the same amount of teeth to the back that you subtract from the front. If you like 44 x 12, you're probably a masher, so I would go for something around 2:1, like 38x18/9. Depends alot on where the 44x12 sits in the dropout.

  3. #3
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Um, shoot. 44x12? I'd say knock it down to something in the 70's and go from there. 38/34x18/14. That'd give you decent street speed and a nice offroad gear and it wouldn't move the wheel much in your dropout.

    May favorite solution is use an 80/90's mtb for commuting.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    Um, shoot. 44x12? I'd say knock it down to something in the 70's and go from there. 38/34x18/14. That'd give you decent street speed and a nice offroad gear and it wouldn't move the wheel much in your dropout.

    May favorite solution is use an 80/90's mtb for commuting.
    What does 'knock it down to the 70's' mean? I don't really want to go much lower because my commute is very long and very flat. Average cruising speed is ~20mph.

    I'm thinking it might just be easier to use a spare wheel/chain and run some huge rear gear paired to a big chainring. Bike isn't going to see a whole lot of off road miles, i predict, offroad SS is a new thing to me and i'm not sure i'd try it if it wasn't so convenient.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  5. #5
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Sorry. Seventy gear inches. Check out a gear inch calculator. 100 rpm at 70 will have you around 20mph.

  6. #6
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    I just recently set up a dingle on my 29SS Inbred. I have a 44/38:18/24 ratio, giving me a 2.4 ratio for on-road and 1.6 for off-road. (1.6 on 29er is like 1.8 on a 26er) 2.4 is good enough for me on-road, but pales in comparison to your 3.7.

    It's best to get Powerlinks like sean salach suggested—its much easier to get the right chain length. But if you're like me and lazy to fiddle with the chain other than to move it to another cog, the 38:18/9 as sean suggested is good, but rather tough on hilly trails. 36:20 will be easier and more suited for climbs with a 1.8 ratio.

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