Help me decide on a 1" fork for Colorado front range- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Reputation: MINImtnbiker's Avatar
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    Help me decide on a 1" fork for Colorado front range

    I've built up my '97 Bontrager Ti frame + '98 Manitou FS Ti fork (1") to a singlespeed with parts I had. Only cost was a chain tensioner. All parts are '97 era. I'm using an XTR crankset and since I had a 24 tooth freewheel cog, I built a 46 x 24. It's a huge gear for long climbs here in Colorado's front range, but I ride big gears anyway.

    I will likely order an ENO hub and rebuid the back wheel over the winter. Seems to be the way to go with vertical dropouts.

    My dilemma is the fork. It's 26" wheels and I don't want to spend much on this first project. I can fit a Conti Diesel if I deflate the tire to put it on this old crummy fork with about 1" of useable travel. And it's a 1" steerer. So my choices are:
    -Marzocchi MX Comp (someone told me you can order a Marathon with 1" steel steerer -- have my LBS checking into that).
    -Rigid, steel or Ti if I can find one for around $250

    Anybody ridden rigid in the rocky Front Range in Colorado? Trails like Dakota Ridge, Apex, Hall Ranch, etc. I assume a 2.5" tire will help... but looking for some guidance here.

    I definitely got the SS bug. My Maverick ML7 w/ DUC fork has been collecting dust for the past few weeks...

  2. #2
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    Reputation: mosquitos's Avatar
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    the magura fork are also available with 1" steerer, but i dunno if it's easy to find in USA
    in addition, these fork (ronin for exemple) have a short axe to crown distance, so the original geometry is safe (and not a chopper ride like the marzo fork )

    another solution is to convert an old fork with a total air carbridge (but i dont know if its available to yours)

    link :http://www.ekosport.com/ta_intro.shtml

  3. #3
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    Thanks. I'll check out the Magura forks

    I really like my Martas... so if the fork has the same level of quality, I'm sold. I'll check the Ronin out.

    I really don't want to go rigid, unless someone had a 1" Ti rigid that offered some level of squishiness.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    FTM
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    I've got a White Bros XC.8 Fork that I had build with a 1" steer tube for my Bontrager Race Light. Only cost an extra $30 for the 1". This fork has been collecting dust since I installed my Walt Works ridgid fork though*. Walt built it to the Bontrager's specs and it is great. It has just the right amount of flex for rack gardens but steers great. I'm running it with a high volume tire (Hutchinson Spider 2.3) up front and it's a great combination.

    *I do ride fixed so I'm probably not going as fast as others and don't need a squish fork as much as others.

  5. #5
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    Atom Bomb

    If you can find one, it was the dope fork for that bike then, and it still works better than most current offers. I found one in great shape for 100.

    I run a franken fork SID with 80 mm on my Bontrager Race and the steering is just fine. I chopped the SID crown so I could use the original bolt-on crown to preserve, as much as possible, the handling of the original. If you are a real maniac for original geometry, you can drop the fork through the crown by 13mm.

    I know what everyone says about SID being too too flexy. I find it helps the handling if I ignore the comments of journalists and well informed members of MTBR.

    Peace
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=FTM]Walt Works ridgid fork though*. Walt built it to the Bontrager's specs and it is great. QUOTE]

    Ditto Waltworks on the rigid fork for Bontrager. I was using an Atom Bomb for a while, but found it raised the front end too much, so I had Walt build me one to mimic the original switchblade fork it came with. Then I snagged a Softride off eBay, which provides good cush. All-in cost was less than $250. Net out the $135 I sold the Zokes for, and it was a very cheap, worthy upgrade. Now that I'm on 29" wheels now though, this is just my garage queen.

    (I know, take off the saddle bag before taking the picture )
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  7. #7
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    Go rigid!

    Fellow Front Range SSer here...

    I ride a SS Mountain Cycle Rumble (aluminum) with a Surly Instigator rigid fork and 2.5 tires front and rear. I run the rear tire at around 30 psi and the front in the mid-20s. Although the front range is hella rocky, I haven't had a problem. I find that gnarly, wide tires really, really, really help. Sure, my SS weighs in at about 28 lbs, but I'll be damned if it doesn't just blow over rocks and kill the downhills.

    I'll admit that I was crying for my mother at the end of the Rainbow Trail after riding from Monarch Pass, but that's the only time I have really cursed the rigid fork. Sourdough trail was fine, and that's nothing but rocks.

    If you go rigid, I found that switching to disc brakes helps because you don't have to squeeze so hard to stop the bike. Squeezing hard at the brakes while going over rocks is what causes most of the pain in my opinion (had V-brakes on the Crest Trail and I could barely hold onto the handlebar at the end of it all).

    Hope this helps!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by panthro
    Fellow Front Range SSer here...

    I ride a SS Mountain Cycle Rumble (aluminum) with a Surly Instigator rigid fork and 2.5 tires front and rear. I run the rear tire at around 30 psi and the front in the mid-20s. Although the front range is hella rocky, I haven't had a problem. I find that gnarly, wide tires really, really, really help. Sure, my SS weighs in at about 28 lbs, but I'll be damned if it doesn't just blow over rocks and kill the downhills.

    I'll admit that I was crying for my mother at the end of the Rainbow Trail after riding from Monarch Pass, but that's the only time I have really cursed the rigid fork. Sourdough trail was fine, and that's nothing but rocks.

    If you go rigid, I found that switching to disc brakes helps because you don't have to squeeze so hard to stop the bike. Squeezing hard at the brakes while going over rocks is what causes most of the pain in my opinion (had V-brakes on the Crest Trail and I could barely hold onto the handlebar at the end of it all).

    Hope this helps!
    Thanks...this is helpful. I'm from Boulder and ride Sourdough a few times a year. Mostly do stuff in West Mag, Rollinsville, etc. And Jeffco. I will check out a rigid over the winter. I can pick up a $40 rigid Tange fork from QBP. Worth a try.

  9. #9
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    I used to be a Bonti dealer and the 97 frames were all designed for suspension, though I don't remember if they were designed around 2" or 3" travel. Any one remember this trivia bit?

  10. #10
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    I was told 70mm when I bought it in '97

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudflaps
    I used to be a Bonti dealer and the 97 frames were all designed for suspension, though I don't remember if they were designed around 2" or 3" travel. Any one remember this trivia bit?
    I currently have a Manitou FS Ti on there which is 70mm but has only about 30mm of useable travel now. Actually I don't think it ever got the full 70 even when new.

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