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  1. #1
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    Help choosing my first SS rigid rig

    What's up guys and gals , I'm hoping you guys and point me in the right direction. I am on the market for my first rigid SS . I already have a remedy 8 but I want a different flavor. I am never had a SS or rigid mountain bike, my budget is around 1000-1300 . I'm asking for yalls help as I don't really know anything of the sort. I will be using it some on roads and a lot on the easier trails (where remedy isn't really needed) when I'm out with my fiancé and kids. So any tips on what to look for and any suggestions are greatly appreciated . Thanks in advance
    If I created this thread in the wrong forum I apologize .
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  2. #2
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    Salsa El Mariachi. Nice steel bike within your budget. Solid components out of the box and doesn't really need anything other than converting to tubeless.

  3. #3
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    Personally, I'd watch local channels for a used SS before I ate depreciation on a new bike.
    You could get your hands on a used Niner, Spot, Soma, On-One, Kona, or Salsa for about half to three-quarters of a new bike, and if SS end up not being your thing, you can sell it for essentially what you paid. Buy a new one and you're gonna be on the other end of that 'off the floor' price hit.

    Here in AZ, we have CL, plus there's several closed FaceBook groups of area riders for buying and selling bike parts. That's where I got my SS.

  4. #4
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    If you're looking for a prebuilt stock bike, the Kona Unit also seems to be a well liked bike. I don't have one, but seems to be pretty popular.

  5. #5
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    What frame material are you looking for? Carbon, aluminum, steel or titanium? Given your budget, titanium is probably a no go. Even carbon is a bit out of your range (unless you buy used).

    I have an aluminum bianchi sok 29er rigid SS. I love it. Made from easton ultralite tubing. Steel has the best ride though...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    Personally, I'd watch local channels for a used SS before I ate depreciation on a new bike.
    You could get your hands on a used Niner, Spot, Soma, On-One, Kona, or Salsa for about half to three-quarters of a new bike, and if SS end up not being your thing, you can sell it for essentially what you paid. Buy a new one and you're gonna be on the other end of that 'off the floor' price hit.

    Here in AZ, we have CL, plus there's several closed FaceBook groups of area riders for buying and selling bike parts. That's where I got my SS.
    This is great advice. When I decided to get a SS I initially wanted new and was looking at your same budget but ended up getting a cheap GF Rig frame and fork off CL then built it up. I don't think I saved a lot in the end but since I picked the parts myself I got what I wanted.

    FWIW, if you're interested in lightweight rigid on a budget the Spec'd Crave and Trek Superfly look like good options. I seriously considered those last year but they were just a bit more than I wanted to spend at the time. Once in a while used ones will come up reasonably priced.

  7. #7
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    considering a "monstercross" style bike? Zipping around easy trails on drop bars with 40c tires is a blast, not to mention building bigger more adventurous gravel/singletrack/road routes is a fun alternative to sticking to the same old single track. Building up SS bikes is nice because your saving lots of cost and weight right away with an SS drivetrain, that leaves more money to spend on a better frame or wheel set or fancy cockpit etc.

  8. #8
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    Lots of good responses here.

    Since you're familiar with Trek, you might also check out the Stache. I haven't ridden one, but its got some things going for it.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the help guys now I have a great list to start researching tonight . I did see once stache and it looked great I'm going to look in my local Craig's list as well and I'm also thinking of doing a build . All great points thanks a lot
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  10. #10
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    One more thing...if you're just getting into SS there's nothing wrong with running a chain tensioner on a HT you already have or picking up a cheap HT to give it a go. It's not ideal but going that route a conversion cost from geared to SS could be done in as little as $30-40.

  11. #11
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    If your intended usage will in fact be mostly pavement/path I think a regular 29er is the best bet. If you get more ambitious and want to use it more off road, you'll have the right tool.

    A older 26", like a Bianchi, would also work great. But if you dig it and want to ride more technical stuff you might regret not having bigger wheels.

    A used Krampus/Stache is a great option, but is a bit much for pavement imo.
    Pedal through it!

  12. #12
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    I wouldn't hesitate to get a 26" first SS bike. Until I bought my SS, all I rode was long travel 26, and there is nothing wrong with those wheels, on any terrain.
    Again, for a first bike, budget over bling, unless you just like to throw money at toys.

    I could be argued that 26 could be beneficial for a new SS, it's just a little easier to pedal a 26 vs 29 at the same gearing.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    I wouldn't hesitate to get a 26" first SS bike. Until I bought my SS, all I rode was long travel 26, and there is nothing wrong with those wheels, on any terrain.
    Again, for a first bike, budget over bling, unless you just like to throw money at toys.

    I could be argued that 26 could be beneficial for a new SS, it's just a little easier to pedal a 26 vs 29 at the same gearing.
    Very good point , and to be honest I'm not set on any wheel size , and honestly that's usual the last thing I worry about I just like to ride and have fun no matter what . I recently saw a really nice 26 SS rigid but don't remember what it was haha
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  14. #14
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    Upon browsing my local Craigslist I found this trek 69er??? Is that really a thing ?? Lol man that thing looks weird as hell

    Bicycle Trek 69 single speed w/2 forks!!
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsteitz View Post
    If your intended usage will in fact be mostly pavement/path I think a regular 29er is the best bet. If you get more ambitious and want to use it more off road, you'll have the right tool.

    A older 26", like a Bianchi, would also work great. But if you dig it and want to ride more technical stuff you might regret not having bigger wheels.

    A used Krampus/Stache is a great option, but is a bit much for pavement imo.
    You can fit 650b on the Bianchi _._.S.S.'s and there are a few floating around. I wouldn't say no to an older 26, but I understand that a bigger wheel has its advantages in the SS game. It's all personal preference and if you ride a 29er generally than you maybe should seek out a 29er SS frame.

    There are also some options for dropouts like Paragon sliders, Salsa alternator, and Surly's standard trackends with a hanger that are not dedicated SS. Getting a frame with one of those options will help with the sell or the move to geared should you not be enthralled with SS.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tidobandito View Post
    Upon browsing my local Craigslist I found this trek 69er??? Is that really a thing ?? Lol man that thing looks weird as hell

    Bicycle Trek 69 single speed w/2 forks!!
    They were and it was. They came out around the time that 29er was picking up speed but when the absolute standard was 26. There wasn't but a whisper of the Ritchey 650b build.

    Trek 69er « Mountain Flyer Magazine
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  17. #17
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    What do you guys think of this one . It's only a 17.5 but looks like it has a longer tt then my 19in remedy

    Bianchi SISS Single Speed
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  18. #18
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    I'd probably talk him down a bit on the '03 SISS, seems mostly stock but does have a sus fork.

    Better price on the '69er.

    You'll have to ride them both and decide for yourself.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  19. #19
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    Yeah I'm hoping to ride them soon but haven't heard back . I think I can talk em down a bit I don't think I've ever paid full or close to asking price on cl. I was also looking at the Kona Unit .
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  20. #20
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    I'm really considering this trek SS superfly . It's on the complete opposite side of the spectrum compared to my remedy 8 and that's what I want . I love the idea of doing my own build , but I have three kids and not a ton of time so I like to spend it riding ! I may have to take a trip down to my lbs. I would love to bring them more business to , because they went WAY above and beyond for my remedy and gave me an Insaine deal . Plus I love the look of this , not that looks a a huge concern but heck it looks sweet to me lol


    Trek Superfly SS - NBX Bikes - Narragansett, Warwick, Providence, and Providence, RI
    16 remedy 8 29er. Push it to the limit !!!!! :cornut:

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    I wouldn't hesitate to get a 26" first SS bike. Until I bought my SS, all I rode was long travel 26, and there is nothing wrong with those wheels, on any terrain.
    Again, for a first bike, budget over bling, unless you just like to throw money at toys.

    I could be argued that 26 could be beneficial for a new SS, it's just a little easier to pedal a 26 vs 29 at the same gearing.

    Indeed, it really just depends on terrain in my opinion. The OP did mention a lot of pavement so wheel size would certainly matter much less.

    For reference, I got into SS this very same way. I ran a Surly Singulator on an mid 90's Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, then a WI ENO hub. While it worked to set the hook, I live in Austin where the trail is basically one big rock garden and I very quickly moved onto a 29er. If there was ever a defining terrain for that wheel size, it's here.

    I still use the GF for around town and pathways, but it was short lived for any real trail duty. Since you can pick up older 29ers so cheap these days I just figured it best to start there.
    Pedal through it!

  22. #22
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    At one of my local bike shops they say the surly krampus is a really fun bike. I heard it rolls really fast. Im sure it depends on how fast you pedal but the 29+ tires probably help plus take the edge off the bumps in a rigid setup. Never tried one myself but it may be one to consider.

  23. #23
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    I would not overlook a good deal on a rigid Unit...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tidobandito View Post
    Upon browsing my local Craigslist I found this trek 69er??? Is that really a thing ?? Lol man that thing looks weird as hell

    Bicycle Trek 69 single speed w/2 forks!!
    Seems like a good price, as you get the Maverick forks and front wheel with it. I'd get it, put the DUC's back and go for it.
    They were very highly regarded and I always fancied one but never got one. Apparently a very good handling bike with the Mavericks and the whole 69er thing is a good concept IMHO.
    I've been riding a Singular Hummingbird for the last six years (rigid 69er) and nothing else gets a look in.
    If that Trek was this side of the Atlantic then I'd have it like a shot....

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tidobandito View Post
    I'm really considering this trek SS superfly . It's on the complete opposite side of the spectrum compared to my remedy 8 and that's what I want . I love the idea of doing my own build , but I have three kids and not a ton of time so I like to spend it riding ! I may have to take a trip down to my lbs. I would love to bring them more business to , because they went WAY above and beyond for my remedy and gave me an Insaine deal . Plus I love the look of this , not that looks a a huge concern but heck it looks sweet to me lol


    Trek Superfly SS - NBX Bikes - Narragansett, Warwick, Providence, and Providence, RI
    This or the Specialized equivalent would be right at or just above your price range depending on what sort of deal you can get at the LBS. Although I'm selling my Superfly SS I absolutely LOVE the bike. Great handling, light, decent component spec, and isn't as stiff as one would think being an aluminum frame.
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