Help: 100% American Made SS 29er- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Help: 100% American Made SS 29er

    I am new to the SS world and need some help putting together a cool SS 29er that is all American made -- frame and components. I am open to, and might even prefer, a rigid bike. I won't say money is no object, but I am not necessarily looking for the cheapest options. I prefer the exclusivity of boutique manufacturers, which I understand the SS 29er world has a lot of.

    Suggestions for American made frames and components greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Moots is made here in Colorado. I'm not sure where Lynskey is made- possibly the US as well. All the custom builders build here. A lot of the tubing is made here, I'm sure.

    Hubs- Phil Wood and Chris King
    Handlebars- Chromags
    Cranks- White Industries (I think)


    Others will have to give you more ideas.

  3. #3
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    For frames, look at Soulcraft out of Petaluma, CA... highly recommended.

    Other than (Flyer) above:

    Hadley hubs - no web site but excellent stuff
    Groovy Luv bars
    Paul Components - brakes, cranks, rings
    "He was a wise man who invented beer."
    -Plato

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Moots is made here in Colorado. I'm not sure where Lynskey is made- possibly the US as well. All the custom builders build here. A lot of the tubing is made here, I'm sure.

    Hubs- Phil Wood and Chris King
    Handlebars- Chromags
    Cranks- White Industries (I think)


    Others will have to give you more ideas.
    Thanks for the great response! Would you mind listing some of the SS 29er custom builders?

  5. #5
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    This would be pretty cool, but a 100% made in the US bike isn't going to happen, but I bet you could do close to 95% or so. I think the biggest problem will be tires, rims and brakes. Personally, I'd shoot for a bike and components that are not farmed out to China.

    White Brothers forks are US made if you want a suspension fork.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  6. #6
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    Ah yes, Hadley hubs- muy excellente!

    Steve Potts (really hard hard to beat this guy's work)
    Carl Strong
    Kent Erickset
    Independent Fabrications
    Black Cat
    Too many others to list but some are really small and have a loooong wait list.

    With Moots and Lynskey, they are not a one-man show so can build some good quality frames at a much higher production level than a one-man show. If I were to buy another SS, the Lynskey would be my choice.

    If money were no object, I'd probably choose Steve Potts.

  7. #7
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    I think Manitou is from Wisconsin??

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan
    Personally, I'd shoot for a bike and components that are not farmed out to China.
    Yep, I was thinking that some of the components might be difficult to find in the "USA made" variety. In the case where an American made component is simply unavailable, I would accept a substitute that is not from China or Taiwan.

  9. #9
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    Spot built here in Golden Colorado.

  10. #10
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    I believe no rims, tires, or chains are American made. Not sure about spokes. No American brake options as far as I know, although plenty of European offerings.

    Custom steel frame (I've researched all of the custom builders out there and will be going with Waltworks when I go custom -- although Curtlo, Quiring, Black Cat, Soulcraft, Independent Fabrications, etc. are other great options), King hubs and headset (and cog), Phil Wood bottom bracket, White Industries crankset and chainring, Thomson seatpost and stem (and seatpost clamp). The only American made saddle I know of is the Selle An-Atomica. Groovy Luv bar.

    If you don't want to drop the cash on custom steel, consider the Quiring Q-Ball. American made and far less expensive than a custom frame.

    Grips? Not sure. Good luck!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by damon09
    I think Manitou is from Wisconsin??
    I think Manitou was originally in Manitou Spring Colorado, but I also believe they have been bought/sold a couple of times too.

  12. #12
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    which tires and saddles are made in the US?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  13. #13
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    What about a Gates Belt Drive system? Not sure if thats American made or not, but it might get around foriegn made chains.
    And plenty of American made frames to fit the belt drive system.
    Its all Shits and Giggles until somebody Giggles and Shits

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattbryant2
    Grips? Not sure. Good luck!
    ODI
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

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    Brakes, hubs, frame, fork

    I want to echo Paul for bomb proof hubs, brakes, even cranks.
    Paul components

    Also Vicious cycles makes some of the best steel forks around, and a great selection of frames. Made in New Paltz, NY. http://www.viciouscycles.com/index.php3

    Gunnar and Waterford both make 29rs in Wisconsin. They operate out of the old Schwinn Paramount Factory.

    "Schwinn was sold in 1993 to the Scott Sports Group, who retained the Paramount name/ trademark but sold off the Waterford factory. It was purchased and is now run by Marc Muller, Richard Schwinn (the great grandson of Ignaz Schwinn) and George Garner." From Sheldonbrown.com

  16. #16
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    Anyone know of an American made SS 29er frame that is a bit unique in appearance? Something that stands out aesthetically from the crowd?

  17. #17
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    Lynskey, Litespeed and Merlin are made here in Tennessee. All three will make you custom Ti frames.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Anyone know of an American made SS 29er frame that is a bit unique in appearance? Something that stands out aesthetically from the crowd?
    If you're trying to be "unique" and "stand out," you have to get a Jones. Can't afford it? Well, you'll just have to be part of "the crowd," like the rest of us.

    Seriously, if you want something unique look into Black Sheep or Retrotech. Better yet -- dream up your own machine and call up a custom builder.

    Otherwise, the EWR 29er is rather unique in appearance.

    (Information about all of these bikes/companies can be found with a simple search.)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Anyone know of an American made SS 29er frame that is a bit unique in appearance? Something that stands out aesthetically from the crowd?
    Not sure if I'd consider them "bit unique in appearance" but I'm scrounging together the cash for a Black Cat. I guess you could consider the swinging drop outs unique.

    I really like how he blends together the curvy and straight tubes.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  20. #20
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    Don McClung,Black sheep and Wolfhound.

  21. #21
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    Double Post
    Last edited by mo0se; 11-08-2009 at 07:11 PM.
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    Frames are easily found... here are some components.. American Classic Wheels and hubs, Oury Grips, Thomsen stem and seatpost, Tires are a problem, but Schwalbe, is a German substitute... but not 100% on that. Brakes, present another problem. Perhaps substitute with Hope brand.. skewers also. Whipperman Chains, The Race Face product is North American.. most of it was anyway. Thats all I can think of for now..
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  23. #23
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    I9 wheels
    american made spokes

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    Frames are easily found... here are some components.. American Classic Wheels and hubs, Oury Grips, Thomsen stem and seatpost, Tires are a problem, but Schwalbe, is a German substitute... but not 100% on that. Brakes, present another problem. Perhaps substitute with Hope brand.. skewers also. Whipperman Chains, The Race Face product is North American.. most of it was anyway. Thats all I can think of for now..
    American Classic hubs are made in Taiwan

    But this brings up another common sentiment that bugs me...
    Taiwanese factories are generally known for paying a living wage and for good working conditions. There are exceptions, but that is true of the US too. They do have laws for labor standards, workers rights, equality in the work place, etc that sound to be on the same level as other nations that people put on their "good" lists.

    Buying American to support your own economy and your fellow Americans in one thing (a noble one for sure), but if you do have to buy something overseas it can sound awfully prejudiced to rank good companies from other North American and European countries above good companies from Taiwan. To me, if you are going to buy overseas you should have a good reason why a good company in one country "deserves" your money more than a good company in any other country. I'm not saying there can't be a good reason either

  25. #25
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    I'm actually quite surprised that it's so difficult to build a bike that 100% American made.

  26. #26
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    I didnt think American Classic outsourced anything...I would call and ask.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    But this brings up another common sentiment that bugs me...
    Taiwanese factories are generally known for paying a living wage and for good working conditions. There are exceptions, but that is true of the US too. They do have laws for labor standards, workers rights, equality in the work place, etc that sound to be on the same level as other nations that people put on their "good" lists.

    Buying American to support your own economy and your fellow Americans in one thing (a noble one for sure), but if you do have to buy something overseas it can sound awfully prejudiced to rank good companies from other North American and European countries above good companies from Taiwan. To me, if you are going to buy overseas you should have a good reason why a good company in one country "deserves" your money more than a good company in any other country. I'm not saying there can't be a good reason either
    Please don't turn this great thread into this politically correct nonsense.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Please don't turn this great thread into this politically correct nonsense.
    Sorry for injecting some perspective and reason. I'll be more careful about that in the future.

    I honestly don't want to get in the way in good discussion about US made parts. You just sounded naive when you said you would accept anything foreign as along as it wasn't from Taiwan (or China, which certainly is a much different issue)

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    I didnt think American Classic outsourced anything...I would call and ask.
    They technically don't outsource because they built their own factory in Taiwan

  30. #30
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    You kinda started with the whole american made only thing. Inadvertently, but still did. And I agree whole heartedly with boomn. While it certainly is admirable to build a wholey US bike, I just don't think it'll be entirely possible. Instead of going that direction, I'd go for companies that support the worker, and/or support the sport.
    Just a regular guy.

  31. #31
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    Some company's make parts all over the place. I have a couple of boxes of DT Revolution spokes that say they are made in the USA.

    Tim

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~martini~
    While it certainly is admirable to build a wholey US bike, I just don't think it'll be entirely possible. Instead of going that direction, I'd go for companies that support the worker, and/or support the sport.
    Here's a novel, American idea: How about you do what you wish with your money and allow me to do what I wish with mine?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    They technically don't outsource because they built their own factory in Taiwan
    This must have been recent.. a review I read in Dirt Rag, or was it Bike? Anyhow, the article stated they were made in house, in Florida. But that was a couple years ago..
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    This must have been recent.. a review I read in Dirt Rag, or was it Bike? Anyhow, the article stated they were made in house, in Florida. But that was a couple years ago..
    Stuff I found showed Taiwan made hubs starting in 04. Wheels may very well still be assembled in the US, but I don't know enough to say anything with authority

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Here's a novel, American idea: How about you do what you wish with your money and allow me to do what I wish with mine?
    Haha, he only made a suggestion. In fact, he quite literally said that it is what he would do with his money and never told you that had to as well

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Moots is made here in Colorado. I'm not sure where Lynskey is made- possibly the US as well. All the custom builders build here. A lot of the tubing is made here, I'm sure.

    Hubs- Phil Wood and Chris King
    Handlebars- Chromags
    Cranks- White Industries (I think)


    Others will have to give you more ideas.
    Flyer, as rad as they are, and they are the raddest by far, Chromag is 100% Canadian made...but hey, its still North America!

    by the way, please do not get a Lynskey and lower the property value of my forthcoming bike. in fact, you are forbidden to get any of the parts that i will have on the bike. thanks in advance.

  37. #37
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    Pretty sure Bontrager rims are still made in the US.

  38. #38
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    Edge rims

  39. #39
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    This should save some ? and time!
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=505988
    Enjoy ;-)

  40. #40
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    Run it fixed with no brakes that should help keep it American. But it is great to support a local custom builder close to you.

  41. #41
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    Sun DS1-XC rims are US made.

    Tim

  42. #42
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    I really like this concept
    Req. Disclaimer: I sell Giant, Trek, and Electra bikes.
    Quote Originally Posted by ErrantGorgon
    The no-brainer store called, they want their question back.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixedforbroke
    I really like this concept
    i too support patriotism


  44. #44
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    Dammit Fo

    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i too support patriotism

    I told you if I let you take that picture of us, you couldn't let anyone else see it!

  45. #45
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    Every Wheelsmith spoke is manufactured in Milwaukee. Not sure about their nipples.
    I believe wipperman chains are german.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    Every Wheelsmith spoke is manufactured in Milwaukee. Not sure about their nipples.
    I believe wipperman chains are german.
    mmmm...nipples (see below)

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    mmmm...nipples (see below)
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    i too support patriotism

    they're covered up

    have we found a US-made saddle yet?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucksaw87
    have we found a US-made saddle yet?
    Derri-Air

  49. #49
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    Economic patriotism: folks who refuse to accept an increasingly globalized world and economics.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    are there any american-made seats that my grandmother wouldn't ride?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  51. #51
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    Is it possible to get an American-made wheelset without having to spend $1K on something like Industry Nine?

  52. #52
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    Fo, I only buy stuff you have already bought- it is your purchase that cheapens them and I pay less after that.

    Good catch on the Chromag but we basically own Canada so I included it. This statement is not intended to start a fight.

    Jake Spoon: Wheelset- if you buy components (Paul) and get some US-made rims and spokes, you will have a cheaper build- far less than 1K. The trick is to find US-made rims.

    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    Flyer, as rad as they are, and they are the raddest by far, Chromag is 100% Canadian made...but hey, its still North America!

    by the way, please do not get a Lynskey and lower the property value of my forthcoming bike. in fact, you are forbidden to get any of the parts that i will have on the bike. thanks in advance.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Is it possible to get an American-made wheelset without having to spend $1K on something like Industry Nine?
    rims are the trick. I9 uses the same rims everybody else does... they just charge out the wazoo for their proprietary other parts.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    rims are the trick. I9 uses the same rims everybody else does... they just charge out the wazoo for their proprietary other parts.
    I9 has started marketing their own rims, not sure where they're made though.

    Plum
    This post is in 3B, three beers and it looks good eh!

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plum
    I9 has started marketing their own rims, not sure where they're made though.

    Plum
    My guess is that Sun makes them in China.

  56. #56
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    For rims you can do Arrow (cheaper) or Edge (bah ling!) I think?

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather
    I9 uses the same rims everybody else does... they just charge out the wazoo for their proprietary other parts.
    Yes they do, but they sure are pretty (and light!). I just bought a pair.
    I'm unique, just like everyone else....

  58. #58
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    Ha this thread is freakin hillarious!
    Req. Disclaimer: I sell Giant, Trek, and Electra bikes.
    Quote Originally Posted by ErrantGorgon
    The no-brainer store called, they want their question back.

  59. #59
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    Jake Spoon, keep us posted. I'd be interested in seeing your bike and build once done. Check with Bontrager about their Bontager rims, though they don't seem to have a handle on their inventory levels.

    While I have one American-made frame and one Taiwanese-made frame, I can appreciate what you're trying to do and at the least, the novelty of it is cool and the info can help others who would like to do the same.

  60. #60
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    Interesting exercise. Not one I'd bother with, but as the man said it's his money. I'd love to see the finished product.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    I didnt think American Classic outsourced anything...I would call and ask.

    All of their components are made in Taiwan. They may assemble the wheels here, but the components all come from Taiwan.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by herothedog
    Spot built here in Golden Colorado.
    I don't think that's true. Only Spot "hand built frames" are made in Golden, the otehrs are made in Taiwan.
    "Fact is only what you believe; fact and fiction work as a team." Jack Johnson

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Check with Bontrager about their Bontager rims...
    I contacted Bontrager and they told me that their Race Lite wheels are 100% made in Wisconsin. Additionally, the Duster and Mustang rims are made in Wisconsin.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucksaw87
    are there any american-made seats that my grandmother wouldn't ride?
    I believe Selle An-atomica saddles are USA made, and they are hella comfortable and good looking, IMHO.

  65. #65
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    Here's what the build looks like so far:

    Frame: Ventana El Comandante
    Fork: Vicious or White Bros.
    Crankset: White Industries
    Chainring: White Industries
    Btm Bkt: White Industries
    Headset: Chris King
    Seatpost: Thomson
    Stem: Thomson
    Saddle: Selle An-Atomica
    Grips: ODI or Oury
    Bars: Groovy Luv Handles
    Hubs: Hadley
    Skewers: Hadley
    Wheelset: Bontrager Race Lite

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Here's what the build looks like so far:

    Frame: Ventana El Comandante
    Fork: Vicious or White Bros.
    Crankset: White Industries
    Chainring: White Industries
    Btm Bkt: White Industries
    Headset: Chris King
    Seatpost: Thomson
    Stem: Thomson
    Saddle: Selle An-Atomica
    Grips: ODI or Oury
    Bars: Groovy Luv Handles
    Hubs: Hadley
    Skewers: Hadley
    Wheelset: Bontrager Race Lite
    Looks great. Is this your first 29er, as well? You may have done the research already, but just FYI:

    a. The Ventana has long chainstays which means a smoother, more stable ride but at the cost of maneuverability in tight sections and ease of manualing. By comparison, many 29er hardtails have chainstays almost a full inch shorter. For the type of riding I do, which is quite technical, I prefer shorter chainstays.

    b. The Ventana has an eccentric bottom bracket, which may never give you trouble or may creak like a mother****er, and possibly slip.

    Good luck!

  67. #67
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    My Gunnar was pretty close
    US Made Frame $ Fork
    Canadian Made Cranks and BB
    US Made Contol Tech Handlebar
    US Made King Headset
    US Made Avid Ultimate Supreme Brake Levers
    US Made Paul Hubs

    Some Race Face Atlas Cranks Made in US now

    <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/33936975@N00/4099741448/" title="G1 11-09 by normbilt, on Flickr"><img src="https://farm3.static.flickr.com/2706/4099741448_abe7a83f14_b.jpg" width="1024" height="708" alt="G1 11-09" /></a>

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattbryant2
    a. The Ventana has long chainstays which means a smoother, more stable ride but at the cost of maneuverability in tight sections and ease of manualing. By comparison, many 29er hardtails have chainstays almost a full inch shorter. For the type of riding I do, which is quite technical, I prefer shorter chainstays.

    b. The Ventana has an eccentric bottom bracket, which may never give you trouble or may creak like a mother****er, and possibly slip.
    I was not aware of these issues. Thanks for the great info!

    Any other frames that you would recommend that can be had for $1000 or less?

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    I was not aware of these issues. Thanks for the great info!

    Any other frames that you would recommend that can be had for $1000 or less?
    If you do decide a bike with shorter chainstays would be more appropriate for the riding you do, the Quiring Q-Ball is American made and has 17" chainstays -- virtually identical to the popular Surly Karate Monkey. Even better, the cost is only $500 for the frame, $125 for the fork. This bike also has horizontal dropouts, which won't squeak or slip like an eccentric bottom bracket might (although you will need to use a chaintug).

    For under $1000, you can also get a custom Curtlo -- that is if you are willing to wait for a bit.

  70. #70
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    There are 3 Americas...North, Central and South. So by definition, Canadian Parts are American. As well as, Argentina, Indiana, Tuscalusa, Mexico, etc....

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Here's what the build looks like so far:

    Frame: Ventana El Comandante
    Fork: Vicious or White Bros.
    Crankset: White Industries
    Chainring: White Industries
    Btm Bkt: White Industries
    Headset: Chris King
    Seatpost: Thomson
    Stem: Thomson
    Saddle: Selle An-Atomica
    Grips: ODI or Oury
    Bars: Groovy Luv Handles
    Hubs: Hadley
    Skewers: Hadley
    Wheelset: Bontrager Race Lite
    Hey Jake,

    I'm with you on this - I started the same sort of thread when I was building up my SS. Your build looks great. A couple of options for you...

    Frame: Spot (as Pabs mentioned - the handmade ones are from Golden, CO), DeSalvo (Ashland, OR), Ericksen (Steamboat Springs, CO). Unfortunately, all of these will set you back a bit more than $1G. For something that stands out from the crowd, you should check out Black Sheep - their swoopy tubes look AWESOME, and they're scary light, too.

    Seatpost: Ericksen (titanium, which is nice on a steel frame).

    Hubs: King

    Wheels: Some folks in the thread I did said the DT wheels made in Ft. Collins are from American made parts (at least the spokes and rims). Not sure about this...

    I was THIS close to doing the White Ind. bottom bracket/crankset/rings - they look SWEET. I cheaped out, but I'm sure you'd be happy. Good luck on the build!

    E

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by theycallmeE
    For something that stands out from the crowd, you should check out Black Sheep - their swoopy tubes look AWESOME, and they're scary light, too.
    Thanks for some great information!

    I agree about Black Sheep. I've considered ordering one, but all the feedback I've heard, here and elsewhere, is that communication with them after placing an order is horrible, at best.

  73. #73
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    I 2nd the vote for Curtlo, fully custom fillet brazed frame for under $1k. You can spec it with the dropouts and tubing you want. I have one of his road bikes and love it.

  74. #74
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    All EndlessBikeCo. Kick-Ass-Cogs and Fibonacci spacer kits are made it the USA! Check em out. www.endlessbikes.com

  75. #75
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    [QUOTE=Normbilt]My Gunnar was pretty close
    US Made Frame $ Fork
    Canadian Made Cranks and BB
    US Made Contol Tech Handlebar
    US Made King Headset
    US Made Avid Ultimate Supreme Brake Levers
    US Made Paul Hubs

    Not even close! A 100% US bike is retarded and it adds no value.

    I going to build a 100% Taiwanese bike
    Sit and spin my ass...

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zion Rasta
    Not even close! A 100% US bike is retarded and it adds no value.

    I going to build a 100% Taiwanese bike
    it ain't about being "cool" or having a more valuable bike...it's about the challenge of finding all the necessary parts for a bike that are made in the US. go ahead and build your 100% taiwanese bike, i'm sure mine's already there.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  77. #77
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    They are kick ass too

    Quote Originally Posted by endlessbikegirl
    All EndlessBikeCo. Kick-Ass-Cogs and Fibonacci spacer kits are made it the USA! Check em out. www.endlessbikes.com
    I am gonna get me one as soon as my Boone wears out. The cool thing about them is that endlessbikegirl won't charge you $7.50 for the box that it comes in either.

  78. #78
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    I'm going to throw a wrench in the works here, but you might look at where these frames get their tubing from. The Ti tubing is likely US made, but I really have no idea. As far as steel, True Temper is US made, Reynolds is UK made, and most other unbranded 4130 is from overseas. I have no idea with Aluminum tubing, but if you're going to go to these great lengths (and expenses) to get a bike made here, you might as well make sure the tubes are made here as well.

    It seems to me that buying a Reynolds tubed bike welded up here in the states is like buying a wheelset where all the parts are made overseas and only the assembly is done here in the states. I don't see the difference.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    I'm going to throw a wrench in the works here, but you might look at where these frames get their tubing from. The Ti tubing is likely US made, but I really have no idea. As far as steel, True Temper is US made, Reynolds is UK made, and most other unbranded 4130 is from overseas. I have no idea with Aluminum tubing, but if you're going to go to these great lengths (and expenses) to get a bike made here, you might as well make sure the tubes are made here as well.

    It seems to me that buying a Reynolds tubed bike welded up here in the states is like buying a wheelset where all the parts are made overseas and only the assembly is done here in the states. I don't see the difference.
    I agree that seeking out a frame produced from USA made tubing is the proper thing to do in this situation. Thanks for pointing that out. However, I disagree that starting a thread on an internet forum and potentially spending more for USA made parts is "going to great lengths." I enjoy the challenge and don't find it to be much of an inconvenience. Even if it was, I don't mind being inconvenienced or spending more for a domestic product. I enjoy supporting American bike and component builders.

    So, this begs the question: Who are the American builders who are using True Temper or other USA tubing for their frames?

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    This must have been recent.. a review I read in Dirt Rag, or was it Bike? Anyhow, the article stated they were made in house, in Florida. But that was a couple years ago..
    If you consider about ten years age recent.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattbryant2
    I believe no rims, tires, or chains are American made. Not sure about spokes. No American brake options as far as I know, although plenty of European offerings.

    Custom steel frame (I've researched all of the custom builders out there and will be going with Waltworks when I go custom -- although Curtlo, Quiring, Black Cat, Soulcraft, Independent Fabrications, etc. are other great options), King hubs and headset (and cog), Phil Wood bottom bracket, White Industries crankset and chainring, Thomson seatpost and stem (and seatpost clamp). The only American made saddle I know of is the Selle An-Atomica. Groovy Luv bar.

    If you don't want to drop the cash on custom steel, consider the Quiring Q-Ball. American made and far less expensive than a custom frame.

    Grips? Not sure. Good luck!
    Bontrager rims are still US made.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  82. #82
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    Is it possible to get an American-made wheelset without having to spend $1K on something like Industry Nine?
    White Industries hubs (and freewheel), Bontrager rims, some DT spokes are made here. Should be well under $600 (with an off the top of my head pricing).
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  83. #83
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    shiggy, good information. Thanks.

    Anyone know of disc brakes that are USA made?

  84. #84
    Beware the Blackbuck!
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    Wheelsmith spokes are all US made aren't they?

  85. #85
    No really, I am that slow
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    So, this begs the question: Who are the American builders who are using True Temper or other USA tubing for their frames?
    Ionic uses TT, but I suspect most custom builders will be happy to use it for you.

  86. #86
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    I like your idea and can't wait to see the finished product. For those that don't like his idea you must now buy your "bikes" from now to eternity from Walmart.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowsCast
    I'm going to throw a wrench in the works here, but you might look at where these frames get their tubing from. The Ti tubing is likely US made, but I really have no idea. As far as steel, True Temper is US made, Reynolds is UK made, and most other unbranded 4130 is from overseas. I have no idea with Aluminum tubing, but if you're going to go to these great lengths (and expenses) to get a bike made here, you might as well make sure the tubes are made here as well.

    It seems to me that buying a Reynolds tubed bike welded up here in the states is like buying a wheelset where all the parts are made overseas and only the assembly is done here in the states. I don't see the difference.
    ShadowCast, I understand your point. But to me the difference is that I'm supporting with my dollars a highly-skilled artisan who lives in my community (in the broadest sense). Most of the money you are spending on a high quality frame is paying for and helping support the skill of the builder, not so much the tubing. The same isn't quite so true of a factory wheelset (although I have paid more for a wheel built by someone I believe to be a highly skilled wheel builder).

    By the way, this comment is more about supporting quality, local companies (whether they are making bikes or baking bread) than any sort of political statement.

    E

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Spoon
    I was not aware of these issues. Thanks for the great info!

    Any other frames that you would recommend that can be had for $1000 or less?
    You are assuming that they ARE issues. a few things, first, the Eccentric on my now 4 year old Toro does NOT creak like a mother... and I'm not a smooth pedaler nor a small guy. And second.. the longer chainstays may be a help depending on your terrain, since you have not mentioned where/what you ride take that into consideration. For MattBryant they don't work becuase of his terrain/ride style but is that YOURS?

    And third, Ventana also now makes Sliding Droput version. That elliminates the Eccentric, and you can adjust the wheelbase nearly a full inch.

    Unless of course you'ved decided to go Steel, then I second Black Cat.. cool as frames...
    -Aaron G.

    "Before D.W., "anti-squat" was referred to as pedal feedback."

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