Grinding over logs- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    92

    Grinding over logs

    I've been riding my new SS (rigid monocog with 34/18) for about 6 months now, mostly on the flatter and not so technical trails in southern NJ. I recently started riding it in Philly, including on some trails with a significant amount of logs. I'm able to get over the smaller logs by bunnyhopping or just with the wheelie-rear wheel flick move.

    For much larger logs, the kind on a geared bike you would grind over on your big chainring, I'm getting stymied. Where I used to wheelie my front wheel up and over, grind in with the chainring to get purchase and stability under my rear tire hits and rolls over, I find that I'm getting hung up, perched precariously on top of the log and unclipping. I also have a minor concern about bashing my chain into logs. I know the chain is much harder/tougher then any log, but I feel like I'm risking damage and an eventual broken chain.

    Any suggestions? Do people run rock rings? Do they still exist?

  2. #2
    One gear to rule them all
    Reputation: 32seventeen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Burgess
    Any suggestions? Do people run rock rings? Do they still exist?
    Lots of SS'ers use ring guards. Spot makes a nice one. Heres a horrible pic of mine.

    https://www.spotbikes.com/
    Last edited by 32seventeen; 06-22-2005 at 07:00 AM.
    Todd............. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoeP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    181

    Try this

    In addition to the bash guard, I forced myself to learn the "jump" technique to clear larger logs:
    1) wheelie up to the log and place the front wheel *on top* of the log
    2) jump up and forward, throwing the bike ahead of you.

    If you do it right, your rear wheel will be on the log and your front wheel on the ground (hopefully you'll still be on top of the bike). Pedal away happy, knowing that your bash guard never even touched the log.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    573
    I don't use a bashring and regularly smash the ring/chain on logs and rocks and other stuff. So far no breakage.

    Without a bashring/big ring it's unsettling at first but then you get used to it. I find I can go over the same size obstacles (if not bigger) as I used to with a FS bike with a very high BB. Like JoeP says throwing the bike helps a lot. In fact, the first time I tried to bunnyhop a smallish log at speed with a FS bike I ended up hitting it square and almost ended my ride there. So much less manoeuverable...

    Maurice

  5. #5
    hands up who wants to die
    Reputation: rpet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,405
    JoeP has a good suggestions. I find hitting the log hard/fast with the front tire up combined with the 2nd-half of a bunny-hop motion usually gets the back over easily (though it can be physically jarring). I hate the grind technique; I tend to hit my pedal and stall out when I try that.

    Get a bashguard. I like the lexan E.13 guard because it seems to slide over obstacles a little easier than aluminum; it's nearly unbreakable too.

    -r
    The server is too busy at the moment. Please try again later.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    92

    hmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by rpet
    JoeP has a good suggestions. I find hitting the log hard/fast with the front tire up combined with the 2nd-half of a bunny-hop motion usually gets the back over easily (though it can be physically jarring). I hate the grind technique; I tend to hit my pedal and stall out when I try that.
    -r
    I kind of figured the response would be to work on the finesse angle. Will do. Part of what spooks me is not having any travel in my fork. So when I do get up and over I don't have the wiggle room of 100mm of travel. Seems like having that slop allows you to get out of the sticky situation of having your rear wheel high up on the log and your front wheel driving into the dirt.

  7. #7
    One gear to rule them all
    Reputation: 32seventeen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    459
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Burgess
    I kind of figured the response would be to work on the finesse angle. Will do. Part of what spooks me is not having any travel in my fork. So when I do get up and over I don't have the wiggle room of 100mm of travel. Seems like having that slop allows you to get out of the sticky situation of having your rear wheel high up on the log and your front wheel driving into the dirt.
    I find that it spooks me more with the 100mm fork compressing as it drives into the dirt and trys to throw you over the bars.
    A rigid fork is more predictable, IMHO
    Todd............. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

  8. #8
    Cyclist
    Reputation: striker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    493

    Joe P's advice plus

    I suggest using Joe's good advice but also consider using more speed. Approach the log with a good head of momentum and help throw yourself UP and over the log, especially if you already know the log is clear on the opposite side.

    Lastly, a couple two by fours in the yard and several hours of practice go a long way.
    "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." -- Benjamin Franklin

    My cycling photos. Enjoy!

  9. #9
    hands up who wants to die
    Reputation: rpet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,405
    Yes - speed is key, just as it is often easier to use speed, pushing with your arms and leg compression to go up a waterbar or railroad-tie step instead of going 3 mph and pedalling.

    A rigid fork could be a benefit for logs, unless it is very short axle-to-crown and you have a long stem. Regardless of what your bike set up is, be ready to shift your weigh back quickly at the apex of the maneuver to avoid an endo.

    -r
    The server is too busy at the moment. Please try again later.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    573

    That would help, but be careful...

    Quote Originally Posted by striker
    I suggest using Joe's good advice but also consider using more speed. Approach the log with a good head of momentum and help throw yourself UP and over the log, especially if you already know the log is clear on the opposite side.

    Lastly, a couple two by fours in the yard and several hours of practice go a long way.
    Flying over the bars/log in this kind of situation isn't fun. Trust me And sometimes too much speed coming out of the obstacle is treacherous. Again, don't ask

    Besides, you can go over logs with practically zero initial speed.
    There's this huge log on a trail I ride regularly that is best tackled square on, but is slanted wrt the singletrack, so one has to slowly position the bike in front first, and then launch it up and over. Not much initial speed but jumping like JoeP described does the trick. It's a log I never miss to pass.

    Maurice

  11. #11
    paintbucket
    Reputation: wooglin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,825
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP
    In addition to the bash guard, I forced myself to learn the "jump" technique to clear larger logs:
    1) wheelie up to the log and place the front wheel *on top* of the log
    2) jump up and forward, throwing the bike ahead of you.

    If you do it right, your rear wheel will be on the log and your front wheel on the ground (hopefully you'll still be on top of the bike). Pedal away happy, knowing that your bash guard never even touched the log.
    Here's a vid of that. At least I think its a vid of that. Its not working on my computer right now, but maybe it will work on yours.

    http://adksportsfitness.com/april2004/columns/mtb.html
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  12. #12
    try driving your car less
    Reputation: jh_on_the_cape's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,097
    my bashguard has little teeth on it that only allow me to slide forwards.
    we also have rocks where i ride. on the last ride, my buddy riding behind me said he saw sparks from my bashguard hitting a rock!
    Only boring people get bored.

  13. #13
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    I find it easier to do log-overs with a rigid fork. A boinger compresses and makes the transition even steeper.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  14. #14
    Nat
    Nat is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,425
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Burgess
    I've been riding my new SS (rigid monocog with 34/18) for about 6 months now, mostly on the flatter and not so technical trails in southern NJ. I recently started riding it in Philly, including on some trails with a significant amount of logs. I'm able to get over the smaller logs by bunnyhopping or just with the wheelie-rear wheel flick move.

    For much larger logs, the kind on a geared bike you would grind over on your big chainring, I'm getting stymied. Where I used to wheelie my front wheel up and over, grind in with the chainring to get purchase and stability under my rear tire hits and rolls over, I find that I'm getting hung up, perched precariously on top of the log and unclipping. I also have a minor concern about bashing my chain into logs. I know the chain is much harder/tougher then any log, but I feel like I'm risking damage and an eventual broken chain.

    Any suggestions? Do people run rock rings? Do they still exist?
    You don't have to be going super-fast to get over a log, but a little momentum helps. When my front tire crests the log, I throw the bike out in front of me to get it over. If the chain/ring hits it, it should just slide over it. It's easier than having teeth that dig into the wood and stop your forward progress.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    354

    Good job! Get the guard

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    You don't have to be going super-fast to get over a log, but a little momentum helps. When my front tire crests the log, I throw the bike out in front of me to get it over. If the chain/ring hits it, it should just slide over it. It's easier than having teeth that dig into the wood and stop your forward progress.
    I run profile cranks with a 30t Mosh(giant) bmx chainwheel with integrated bashguard, can you say buRRly?? Since the guard is integrated, it's only as big as it needs to be. The ring is small enough that I hardly ever hit it unless I am going over a huge log, (old growth perhaps?) or getting very sloppy in my tecnique.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PinsNeedles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    687

    Nice loggin' Nat

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    You don't have to be going super-fast to get over a log, but a little momentum helps. When my front tire crests the log, I throw the bike out in front of me to get it over. If the chain/ring hits it, it should just slide over it. It's easier than having teeth that dig into the wood and stop your forward progress.
    29" wheels help too.
    I took those pics of Nat right after he got his Rig...He was log happy !
    BTW, you forgot to put the pick of you going splat on the first attempt
    You rock, and roll !
    Jefe'
    ' Bend's dirtiest Acupuncturist '

    bendoregonsinglespeeders

    teamwebcyclery

  17. #17
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,421
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeP
    In addition to the bash guard, I forced myself to learn the "jump" technique to clear larger logs:
    1) wheelie up to the log and place the front wheel *on top* of the log
    2) jump up and forward, throwing the bike ahead of you.

    If you do it right, your rear wheel will be on the log and your front wheel on the ground (hopefully you'll still be on top of the bike). Pedal away happy, knowing that your bash guard never even touched the log.
    Yep, that works or straight out bunny hopping. The bash ring technique feels like cheating to me.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  18. #18
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,717

    Careful if you have an ISIS setup

    I hear the ISIS BBs are particularly prone to bearing failure if you tend to bash your CR into stuff. Heck, they are kinda prone to failure even if you don't bash them!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    87

    RaceFace has a SS-crankset with an integrated "rockring"

    Evolve X-Drive Single Speed
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: justen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    485
    Quote Originally Posted by wooglin
    Here's a vid of that. At least I think its a vid of that. Its not working on my computer right now, but maybe it will work on yours.

    http://adksportsfitness.com/april2004/columns/mtb.html
    Nice vid. That's cool for places where you have some speed. I have trouble doing log overs when I'm climbing a 10+% grade. I don't have any speed, so to speak. I have to slow to a crawl coming up to the log, to rest up, then sprint and scramble just before it, and hope I make it over. Totally wipes me out when there's a series of these.

  21. #21
    Nat
    Nat is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,425
    Quote Originally Posted by PinsNeedles
    you forgot to put the pick of you going splat on the first attempt
    That pic somehow got deleted from my harddrive!

Similar Threads

  1. drivetrain making loud grinding sound when muddy
    By Accidental Endo in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-14-2005, 07:16 AM
  2. drivetrain making loud grinding sound when muddy
    By Accidental Endo in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-13-2005, 02:43 AM
  3. Going over logs
    By martynda in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-13-2004, 03:50 PM
  4. Help with crank grinding
    By Razor in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 04:37 PM
  5. clearing logs
    By lbreevesii in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-24-2004, 06:51 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.