Good SS road frame- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    enjoys skidding
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    Good SS road frame

    I built my mum up a SS roadie a while ago for commuting (she has a ultra expensive geared Colnago for weekends but wanted something simple for riding to work).

    She was hit by a car a few weeks ago and her commuter is pretty well bent now. She is on the mend, but we are looking at new bikes for her now. She didn't like the setup that she ran in the past - a tensioner on"semi-horizontal" dropouts (similar to the Surly Crosscheck). She had a bit of trouble figuring out the tensioner. It didn't seem like rocket science to me, but some people just don't get these sort of things.

    So basically I'm looking for a way that I can get her riding the most basic singlespeed around. I want something that I can tension, and then for her to change a tyre is a very simple job. I came across the Voodoo Wazoo which looks like a really good option, but unfortunately she needs something a bit smaller (ideally a 47.5 size, but could probably ride a 46.5 or a 48). Does anyone know of any other road frames with sliding dropouts?

    Failing this, how well would an ENO hub work in this situation? I don't really know how they work. I get the impression that every time you take the wheel off, you need to adjust the tension again?

    Are there any other options for her? Thanks and sorry for the essay.

  2. #2
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    Well, if the dropouts were like the Cross Check then a tensioner would not have been required. A Cross Check would be a good frame and available in those sizes. IRO www.irofixedgear.com has some good frames, all with track ends (and for a very good price). Look at their geometries, not their sizing to determine the best fit. I roll on a Mark V in the summer and it's light, fast, cheap. I do not expect to get anything wider than a 23mm tire on it, however. The options are somewhat limited I suppose because of her size. Search for track frames.

  3. #3
    enjoys skidding
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    Why wouldn't she need a tensioner? Her wheel was being pulled forwards in the dropouts and therefore the chain tension wasn't as tight as it should have been. This would have been fixed by using a bolt axle but once again she didn't want this as she didn't know how to use it and preferred quick release.

  4. #4
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    No experience yet but Monday I'll have a new wheel set built up with the WI ecc hub.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    Why wouldn't she need a tensioner? Her wheel was being pulled forwards in the dropouts and therefore the chain tension wasn't as tight as it should have been. This would have been fixed by using a bolt axle but once again she didn't want this as she didn't know how to use it and preferred quick release.
    If she can't use a bolt on axle how is she going to handle track ends? She wouldn't need a tensioner because the dropouts have adjustment in them. Perhaps using a good steel QR would be sufficient to hold the wheel.

  6. #6
    enjoys skidding
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    Hence why I'm looking for a setup that doesn't use track ends. The sliding dropouts look like the perfect option. Are there many road frames around with sliding dropouts?

  7. #7
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    your mum

    Quote Originally Posted by jasevr4
    Hence why I'm looking for a setup that doesn't use track ends. The sliding dropouts look like the perfect option. Are there many road frames around with sliding dropouts?
    nice of you to take care of your mum.

    For ease, go with horizontal dropouts, a quick release skewer, and one chain tug on the drive side. fast wheel changes, easy to tension the chain, wheel stays in place.

    i second IRO for a good place for road frames with horizontal dropouts. i built a 2 x2 (two speed) on one of the road frames. pay attention to the spacing of the dropouts as some track frames are 120mm, lots of road frames are 130mm, and mt bike frames are 135mm.

    for such a small fit, you might want to go with a small mt bike frame and use 26" wheels.

    good luck.

  8. #8
    enjoys skidding
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    I haven't seen much of the IRO bikes myself. I'm looking into a SS cyclocross style bike and the Rob Roy looks interesting. Unfortunately mum is useless enough not to be able to figure out how to use a chain tug. Yep, even the Surly is too hard for her! I take it sliding dropouts on a road frame aren't all that common?

  9. #9
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    consider the hub and bolts

    I have 3 single speed/fixed bikes, 2 mt bikes (sycip, bianchi), one road (IRO). I built two of them, and totally modified the third.

    I must admit that i'm confused by terminology of dropouts.

    All 3 of mine have rear-facing and what i would call "horizontal dropouts".
    I've never understood how these differ from "track dropouts"; seems like they are the same.
    And i'm not sure what is meant by "slider dropouts".
    Are they forward facing, but horizontal or nearly horizontal like in the crosscheck?

    here's another idea...get a phil wood hub/wheel. a bit expensive, but easier to use. i have a rear wheel built from a phil wood Kiss Off hub on one of my mt bike SSs, and the bolts are so good that i've never needed a chaintug. it never slips no matter how hard i crank while climbing. just carry an allen/hex wrench or multitool. those little bolts in the crosscheck frame would never have to be altered; they would help her get the wheel in straight every time.

  10. #10
    i ride bikez!!11!
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    Horizontal dropouts are the same as track ends (though some people will argue the terminology, they're same thing)

    Then you have semi-horizontal dropouts or forward facing dropouts, ie: Surly Crosscheck.

    Sliding dropouts are just that; they slide along a short area in the end of the frame.




    As to the OP, why not just use a regular frame with something like Surly tensioner? That is absolutely the easiest way to maintain tension. Once you set it up for her, she shouldn't ever have to touch it, even when removing/replacing the wheel.

  11. #11
    enjoys skidding
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    Thanks Dan I didn't even realise that it just uses a normal track ends.

    I really appreciate the replies - I'll have to see what we can come up with haha.

  12. #12
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    Get an old '80s road frame. You can often find em for free to $50 on craigslist.

    I'm building up an old '87 Schwinn World Sport frame into a SS commuter. double butted chomoly 4130 frame, lugged, semi-hori drop outs. Its a sweet frame. Quite similar to a crosscheck actually.

  13. #13
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    Redline!

    i have a redline 9 to 5 frame that i'm super stoked on, horozontal drop outs, relaxed geometry. i commuted 21 miles each way for most all spring-summer-fall this year, i love it and they are pretty cheap on e-bay. i use it on my roller trainer for now, till the weather decides to play nice like.

  14. #14
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    Dan,
    where did you get that tensioner? it looks aftermarket and like something i might want.

  15. #15
    i ride bikez!!11!
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    It's not mine. I did a google search for 'sliding dropouts' and that's one of the results. It looks like a Planet X frame, though.

  16. #16
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    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=3020

    I just built myself up one of these and took her on her maiden voyage today, had LOADS of fun. Maybe it was the icy roads on a fixie but it was a lot of fun to ride, I can't wait for my commute into work tomorrow. It has little grub screws built into the frame dropouts to position the wheel straight and tension the chain. Set it up once and your mum ought to be able to handle it from there. Again...so fun.

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