A good, 135mm, cup and cone, flip-flop hub.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4

    A good, 135mm, cup and cone, flip-flop hub.

    What gives with all these cartridge bearing hubs? To hell with that, I want serviceability dammit! I also want 135mm, fixed/free and it's got to be silky smooth and tough as nails. Has anyone found a hub like this? Or any decent cup and cone bearing flip-flops bigger than 120mm?

    I'm getting ready to build a new back wheel for work and need the wide spacing for my chainline, the flip-flop action for my tired legs and the serviceable bearings to help keep my checking account open.

    So lay it on me! Opinions? Rants? Are cartridge bearing hubs (other than the uber-spendy Kiss-offs) worth their salt? Am I just being stubborn?

  2. #2
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    Your asking for a lot.
    I'd say your best bet is to find a flop-flop cup/cone hub spaced for 120mm, and replace the axle with a longer one, and re-space it for 135mm.
    It would be a lot easier, and maybe cheaper to get a Surly New Hub and call it a day.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    416
    This might be stretching it a little. But if you drill a cog with the six bolt disc pattern and use a shimano freehub (XT or something similar) you've got all that you need.

    Flip flop (might be a wierd truing or respacing of the axle, dunno for sure)
    Cup 'n'Cone
    Durable
    Servicable (every bikeshop has the parts)

    Okay it's not single speed specific but it gets the job done.
    Last edited by DiDaDunlop; 03-11-2007 at 01:02 PM. Reason: removed a wierd typo

  4. #4
    blame me for missed rides
    Reputation: weather's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    789
    Quote Originally Posted by nicoffeine
    What gives with all these cartridge bearing hubs? To hell with that, I want serviceability dammit! I also want 135mm, fixed/free and it's got to be silky smooth and tough as nails. Has anyone found a hub like this? Or any decent cup and cone bearing flip-flops bigger than 120mm?

    I'm getting ready to build a new back wheel for work and need the wide spacing for my chainline, the flip-flop action for my tired legs and the serviceable bearings to help keep my checking account open.

    So lay it on me! Opinions? Rants? Are cartridge bearing hubs (other than the uber-spendy Kiss-offs) worth their salt? Am I just being stubborn?
    cartridge bearing hubs can also be serviced. you simply pop the old bearing out and put in a new one.

  5. #5
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,718

    Or...

    Quote Originally Posted by weather
    cartridge bearing hubs can also be serviced. you simply pop the old bearing out and put in a new one.
    Pop the bearings out, pry the seals out, wash the old grease out with solvent, dry, clean, repack and put the seals back with new grease. I've done it a few times myself.

    Heck, I kinda feel like a cheapskate doing it considering new bearings cartridges are like $10 each.

  6. #6
    blame me for missed rides
    Reputation: weather's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    789
    Quote Originally Posted by pimpbot
    Pop the bearings out, pry the seals out, wash the old grease out with solvent, dry, clean, repack and put the seals back with new grease. I've done it a few times myself.

    Heck, I kinda feel like a cheapskate doing it considering new bearings cartridges are like $10 each.
    pat yourself on the back for being an environmentally friendly mountain biker.

  7. #7
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by nicoffeine
    What gives with all these cartridge bearing hubs? To hell with that, I want serviceability dammit! I also want 135mm, fixed/free and it's got to be silky smooth and tough as nails. Has anyone found a hub like this? Or any decent cup and cone bearing flip-flops bigger than 120mm?
    One possibility is to use the singlespeed disc brake hub of choice and then bolt a fixed cog onto the disc mounts.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4

    crafty....

    I'm into this disc hub idea Anthony, thanks for the link.

    Otherwise, if yer going to make a case for any cart. bearing hubs, I want to hear a case for cart. bearings first. The main drawback of the cart. bearing is that no, they don't always go back into service by prying off the cap and repacking them in the style of cup and cone bearings (although yes, some do), they can freeze up in there and be a nightmare, and decent replacements are more than 10 bones.

    I put at least 250 miles of hard, abusive riding on my wheels a week. That mileage adds up to a lot of cart. bearings or a lot of tinkering around trying to repack cart. bearings. Believe me, were this not the case I'd pickup whatever hub fit the rest of my criteria and be happy.

    Spacing out a 120mm track hub would work, but not so well for my chainline.

    Thanks for the replies everyone.

  9. #9
    conjoinicorned
    Reputation: ferday's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,525
    and decent replacements are more than 10 bones
    LOL. these are some of the best bearings around IMO, and they sure aren't more than 10 bucks....

    however i agree with you in a lot of ways. i have some cup 'n cones that have lasted more than a decade....hard to argue with that!!!
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  10. #10
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,670
    When it comes to cartridges, my experience has been fine using them, but I just plain like working on cup and cone hubs. It is very satisfying to be able to re-pack your hub and fine tune the adjustment as often as needed to keep your wheels rolling super smooth.

    Although cartridges are definitely effective and reliable, your only option is to wait until they degrade to the point you can't handle it anymore and then replace the whole bearing. You don't have that option to keep them running as good as new with regular maintenance.

    That being said, I'm riding LX cartridge on my 29er MTB (1x8) 'cuz they fit my budget (couldn't afford Phil Wood). My SS cross/commuter has DX cup and cone hubs, but I want to try fixie this year so I just ordered new wheels built on Surly flip-flop mountain hubs that I plan to jam into the 130mm touring frame. I love Surly stuff and it is hard to pass up the bang for the buck.

    If you go the bolt-on fixie route be sure to post some pictures.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    161
    Quote Originally Posted by anthony.delorenzo
    When it comes to cartridges, my experience has been fine using them, but I just plain like working on cup and cone hubs. It is very satisfying to be able to re-pack your hub and fine tune the adjustment as often as needed to keep your wheels rolling super smooth.

    Although cartridges are definitely effective and reliable, your only option is to wait until they degrade to the point you can't handle it anymore and then replace the whole bearing. You don't have that option to keep them running as good as new with regular maintenance.

    That being said, I'm riding LX cartridge on my 29er MTB (1x8) 'cuz they fit my budget (couldn't afford Phil Wood). My SS cross/commuter has DX cup and cone hubs, but I want to try fixie this year so I just ordered new wheels built on Surly flip-flop mountain hubs that I plan to jam into the 130mm touring frame. I love Surly stuff and it is hard to pass up the bang for the buck.

    If you go the bolt-on fixie route be sure to post some pictures.

    Regards,
    Anthony
    those lx's are cup and cone. shimano has never made a cartridge bearing hub.

    oh, and I'm pretty sure surly is making those hubs in 130 spacing. no need to stretch your frame.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4
    Truly, it's all a matter of preference. Anthony summed up a big part of my cup and cone sentiments. Not to mention those cup and cone xtr hubs I'm running have over 4k hard earned miles on 'em. Overhauled exactly twice. I think it's just a better, cleaner, more personable way to go.

    If I can find some 130/135mm freewheel hubs with a disc mount I might try the disc/fixed deal and I will definitely post some photos if I do.

    And Ferday, I wasn't questioning yer 10dollar cart.'s, but one of my ex co-workers warned me about the cost of replacing the cart. bearings in his surly's. The better cart.'s were like 30, but yer right, they're probably no better than those 10 dollar ones in the end. However, on the high end of things, a precision machined set probably does cost more and performs longer.

  13. #13
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,670
    Quote Originally Posted by dannybob
    those lx's are cup and cone. shimano has never made a cartridge bearing hub. oh, and I'm pretty sure surly is making those hubs in 130 spacing. no need to stretch your frame.
    Hey, that is good news. The LX wheels are new, they have basically just been on the bike since I got them. I just assumed that newer Shimano was using cartridges -- no idea why I thought that. I've been riding them all winter, now I get to overhaul them this spring... Cool! (or dorky... I dunno... )

    I went with the 135 mm because I want to be able to easily switch wheels between my cross/commuter and my MTB. I'm getting Surly track ends brazed on this week, so I'll get the mechanic to also cold set the stays and check the alignment.

    Regards,
    Anthony

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    135
    I've broken 2 Deore axles in the last year. they snap right at the end of the cone. Granted, they were front hubs, deore, and I'm cheap.

    You can clean out and repack cartridges all you want but the bearings are still sh!t after they've been used for long enough to warrant a repack.

    Has anyone with XT's been experiencing mystery hub loosening? I've been tightening accordingly but the drive side axle nut still seems to want to back off from the cone. This has been the case on disc and non-disc XT's. Wierd. Wish I didnt have to loosen the non drive side to get the drive side out enough to lock the cone against the nut. PITA.

    I still prefer the adjustability and smooveness of cup n' cone. Solution to the ISIS BB problem?

  15. #15
    I am the owl
    Reputation: riderx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,904
    Quote Originally Posted by Knuckles
    Solution to the ISIS BB problem?
    Please, no. Loose bearing BBs and headsets are not something I want to see return. I just installed an old school Ritchey on the townie bike, but for the MTBs I'd prefer set and forget. Then again, I've never had the ISIS problem since I've stuck w/ square taper.

    SingleSpeedOutlaw .com
    Riding Bikes and Drinking Beer.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.