gearing and gear inches for around town- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    don't try this at home
    Reputation: moschika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,601

    gearing and gear inches for around town

    what kind of gearing would you run for around town? 26" wheels.

    could i get a sense using gear inches? on my road fixie i'm running around 75 gear inches, would like this bike to be in the sixties. what are some you running?

    and yes this is for my cruiser.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Kennetht638's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    168
    Obviously your gearing depends on how hilly your area is. At home, where it's nice and flat, I run my SS MTB 42x17 or about 63.6 gear inches, and it's just a tiny bit too easy. At school, where it's hilly, I use a fixed roadie with 46x17 or about 72.4 gear inches and it's a tiny bit too hard.

  3. #3
    all hail der Fuhrer Bush
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,635

    wow, someone who actually speaks gear inches

    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    what kind of gearing would you run for around town? 26" wheels.

    could i get a sense using gear inches? on my road fixie i'm running around 75 gear inches, would like this bike to be in the sixties. what are some you running?

    and yes this is for my cruiser.
    First let me say that 75" seems a tad high for a road fixie, you might as well ride a gearie bike as it's not forcing you to spin all that fast, which is the point, no?

    For a towner/commuter/utility type bike, something around 65" seems to work well. For that matter, that's the preferred gear inch for road fixers for winter training, as agreed upon by decades of roadies seeking offseason fitness.
    So in summary, somewhere between 60-70 gear inches for your town bike, try 65" and modify as conditions warrant.
    So, I don't have to once again explain gear inches and give the formula? Cool, I was getting sick of typing in that boilerplate, everybody here speaks ratios, like the frogs in France, instead of gear inches like 'Mericans.

  4. #4
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657

    Personally.......

    I run a 46x18 (66.44" gear) on my converted MTB townie cruiser. I like it.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  5. #5
    don't try this at home
    Reputation: moschika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,601
    i'm not much of a spinner and i ride usually flat roads with the fixie. the 75 GI's works fine. thanks for the input. if all goes well the cruiser will be around 67 GI's.

    gear inches is something i can visualize so it's a nice number to use. it's hard visualizing ratios. as for formulating it, sheldon's calculator does all the work.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    18
    I run a 40:16 (65 inches) on my Kona Unit...which affords me a good aerobic workout on concrete (without spinning out too much) as well as a great offroad workout. It is generally pretty flat where I live but I deal with a few hills by just standing up an getting after it.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    338
    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    what kind of gearing would you run for around town? 26" wheels.

    could i get a sense using gear inches? on my road fixie i'm running around 75 gear inches, would like this bike to be in the sixties. what are some you running?

    and yes this is for my cruiser.
    I'm running 58 GI on my cruisier in very hilly Vancouver Canada. On my commuter which is a 1x7 I stay 80% of the time in 65 GI, but I gotta get into the 50s on the climbing sections. I think in gear inches too, but we all got to be talking about the same size of wheel. Sheldon Brown has an interesting idea for a "Gain Ratio" that takes wheel size into account.

  8. #8
    all hail der Fuhrer Bush
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,635

    no offense, but I think you got it bass-ackwards

    [QUOTE=moschika]i'm not much of a spinner and i ride usually flat roads with the fixie. the 75 GI's works fine.

    But, but, isn't the point of riding a fixed gear to Become a Better Spinner? If you geared down about 10 gear inches, you Would Become a Better Spinner and you wouldn't have to make apologies for your cadence.
    If it was easy, everyone would be doing it. Mountain biking gives you all the high gear mashing training you need. Spinning your legs off occasionally is the ideal counterpoint to that. That's why generations of roadies have always trained on fixed gears on the offseason, to dial in their spin - the frogs call it souplesse -- before they revert back to mashing the big gears in the season.
    65", give or take a couple, will take your cycling skills to the next level.

  9. #9
    all hail der Fuhrer Bush
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,635

    correction

    Quote Originally Posted by hu-man
    I'm running 58 GI on my cruisier in very hilly Vancouver Canada. On my commuter which is a 1x7 I stay 80% of the time in 65 GI, but I gotta get into the 50s on the climbing sections. I think in gear inches too, but we all got to be talking about the same size of wheel. Sheldon Brown has an interesting idea for a "Gain Ratio" that takes wheel size into account.
    Gear inches DOES take wheel diameter into account,that's exactly why I use it instead of just speaking of gear ratios. OK for the umpteenth time:
    #front teeth divided by #rear teeth multiplied by WHEEL DIAMETER = gear inches.
    I believe sheldon's system also factors in crank arm length
    But if you choose to adopt his system over gear inches in search of ultimate accuracy, then you should also factor in the rider's femur length, which also has an effect on one's ability to power the pedals. Someone once published a chart comparing famous riders' femur lengths to their heights, and to a man, those riders with the longest femurs were also the best climbers during their pro road careers. Wish I had that chart. I recall one conclusion: That the reason Francesco Moser, and otherwise great all around rider, never excelled on the big climbs is due to his relatively short femurs.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    17

    65" on MTB/ around town fixed

    44:17 on 26x1.25" tires that are around 25 1/8" in diameter.

    Commute, short hills and some fireroad riding.

    Tim
    <img src="https://homepage.mac.com/tim_louis/.Pictures/Bikes/RitcheyFG.jpg" BORDER=3>

  11. #11
    don't try this at home
    Reputation: moschika's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,601
    Quote Originally Posted by bulC

    But, but, isn't the point of riding a fixed gear to Become a Better Spinner?
    is it? i tried fixed riding to add a bit of variety to my bikes and riding. not really to 'improve' my spinning.

    [/QUOTE]you wouldn't have to make apologies for your cadence.[/QUOTE]

    i don't make apologies for my cadence. it is what it is.

    [/QUOTE]65", give or take a couple, will take your cycling skills to the next level.[/QUOTE]
    thanks for the tip tho. if/when i finish my other projects and can spare some change for a new cog, i'll try it out.

  12. #12
    Out spokin'
    Reputation: Sparticus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Posts
    9,657

    And the crowd roared

    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    is it? i tried fixed riding to add a bit of variety to my bikes and riding. not really to 'improve' my spinning.
    Hallelujah!

    "you wouldn't have to make apologies for your cadence."
    i don't make apologies for my cadence. it is what it is.
    moschika, you have my undying respect.

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  13. #13
    I'm feeling dirty, you?
    Reputation: jonowee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    855
    uhh... darn it, bulC probably going to knock me for having 74.6 gear inches on road.

    But at least it's not a fixie.

  14. #14
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,179
    Until my commute changed this year to include an 800' climb over Portland's West Hills, I settled on 42x17 (on a 'cross wheel, that's 67 gear inches) as the perfect around-town gear for me, allowing me to comfortably cruise the flats in the high teens but still get up most moderate hills.

    For hillier terrain or for a heavier/slower cruiser, I'd gear it lower. Probably 60-65 inches. On a 26" wheel, that means a big cog/little cog ratio of 2.3:1 to 2.5:1.

    Your mileage may - rather, will - vary. Singlespeeding means that one gear has to do everything, and is by definition a compromise. Since none of us has the same weight, strength, mix of riding or pedaling style, by definition the same ratio cannot be the best compromise among climbs, flats and descents for all riders. Prepare to experiment.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: biss-ness's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    230
    Mine has swiched from a ridge 44/16 x 26 = 71.5 ... to a 44/18 x 26 = 63.5 with a tensioner and will soon be, 44/17 x 26 = 67.29 with out tens. (as soon as i can find a 17t shim. comp. bmx cog.) i have found that 71.5 is good on flats but makes for a slow climb, with sore knees. but 63.5 is too spinny on flats. so when i find that perfect gear i'll share my advice...

Similar Threads

  1. Gearing 101 on a Karate Monkey
    By !bike in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 08-07-2004, 09:09 AM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.