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  1. #1
    I work in .001 tolerances
    Reputation: HomegrownMN's Avatar
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    New question here. Gearing change question....(help out a newb)

    O.K. after lurking here for many weeks I've built up my original Trek steel
    hardtail into a SS. (pics are soon to come!)
    Here is my question: I found the magical gearing that allows me to run
    without a tensioner. It's 32:13. Way too steep for anything not flat.
    Does any one know how I can convert that into something more off-road
    friendly, like a 32:17 / 32:18 / 32:20 without loosing the non-tensioner route?
    I somewhat understand the "rule of 4" but I would only like to change out the
    rear sprocket and keep the 32 in front.
    ANY help would be appreciated!
    I reward you with pics of the new ride tonight.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Reputation: pacman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomegrownMN
    O.K. after lurking here for many weeks I've built up my original Trek steel
    hardtail into a SS. (pics are soon to come!)
    Here is my question: I found the magical gearing that allows me to run
    without a tensioner. It's 32:13. Way too steep for anything not flat.
    Does any one know how I can convert that into something more off-road
    friendly, like a 32:17 / 32:18 / 32:20 without loosing the non-tensioner route?
    I somewhat understand the "rule of 4" but I would only like to change out the
    rear sprocket and keep the 32 in front.
    ANY help would be appreciated!
    I reward you with pics of the new ride tonight.
    Thanks!
    32:17 sort of works, loose enough so that the chain would sag ~5/8". If you've been testing with an old chain, a new chain would tighten that up.

  3. #3
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Gearing response...

    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    32:17 sort of works, loose enough so that the chain would sag ~5/8". If you've been testing with an old chain, a new chain would tighten that up.
    That is what I was hoping. I will be using a new chain too.
    Also, I don't have a problem with filing the dropouts if need be.
    I have used the "fix-me-up" program and was a little confused because
    they didn't show my 32:13 as a viable option. I've measured the chainstays
    at around 17" with a tape.(kinda hard to get any more accurate)
    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomegrownMN
    That is what I was hoping. I will be using a new chain too.
    Also, I don't have a problem with filing the dropouts if need be.
    I have used the "fix-me-up" program and was a little confused because
    they didn't show my 32:13 as a viable option. I've measured the chainstays
    at around 17" with a tape.(kinda hard to get any more accurate)
    Thanks!
    I'd like to see chainstays measured +/- .005". It's easier to derive it from the gears, chain, and slack numbers as measured.
    I'm betting your old chain was worn enough to make the new chain too tight. It will need some breaking in. The point is that most bikes need some way to account for chain wear unless they are driveway queens.

  5. #5
    I work in .001 tolerances
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    Measuring chainstays....

    Quote Originally Posted by pacman
    I'd like to see chainstays measured +/- .005". It's easier to derive it from the gears, chain, and slack numbers as measured.
    I'm betting your old chain was worn enough to make the new chain too tight. It will need some breaking in. The point is that most bikes need some way to account for chain wear unless they are driveway queens.
    How can I get an accurate measurment to .005"?
    Also, the dropouts are not totally vertical and not horizontal. They are
    around a 45 degree angle which help in mounting the chain and
    then pulling the wheel into the dropout for the proper tension.
    The chain on there now is Very tight with the 32:13. (new chain too)

    Thanks for taking the time to help me out Pacman!

    (FWIW I've searched MANY times on this subject and used the FAQ.)

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HomegrownMN
    How can I get an accurate measurment to .005"?
    You don't. But from your data my computer says your chainstays are 16.807"

  7. #7
    Samsonite Tester
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    Get the right gear for you then worry about about the "clean" look. Get a half link and an inexpensive tensioner from Pryamid. You will be able to make any tooth combo work.
    Yeah I gotta question. You got any excuses tonight Roy ? -Antonio Tarver

    There is room for it all, just ride what you like to on what you like to...that's freeriding. -rbn14



  8. #8
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    i've had decent results with a 34t and either 19, 20, or 21 cog in the back depending upon what chain you're gonna run and if it's new or old. that said, you'll probably want a half link if not a tensioner or eno eccentric eventually.

    best o luck

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