Freewheel VS. Cassette Body???- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: badgermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    571

    Freewheel VS. Cassette Body???

    Hey Folks--

    Just curious...I see a TON of singlespeeds (blinglespeeds, really) running cassette body hubs with cogs as opposed to thread on freewheels. Examples are Hopes/Kings/I9 etc.

    I know that chainline is easier to manipulate. And I know it's cheaer to convert a 9 speed freehub body as opposed to rebuilding an entire wheel. But I'm not sure as to the other avantages. I run Surly hubs with a WI freehwheel. The setup is pretty nice. My engagement is solid, and the hubs seem to be pretty straightfoward. I can wrench on them without much moer than a cone wrench.

    Why don't I see more folks running my "old school" set up?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Freewheel VS. Cassette Body???-awaiting-trial-001.jpg  


  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: A1an's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,927
    I would imagine it all comes down to cost. Cheaper to throw spacers and a cog onto an existing hub rather than rebuild the wheel with a new hub.
    Signature

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,501
    "old school"?? dude, you've got disc brakes!! what's "old school" about that?!
    and are those ergonomic grips, not foamies!!??!!??


    I dig freewheel'd wheels because if you want a change of engagement or somesuch you can spin on a new freewheel.
    That being said, with the exception of WI, there aren't exactly a ton of options for high-engagement point freewheels.
    Of course if you wanted a new higher engagement HUB you'd be looking at new hub AND new wheelbuild costs...
    Besides that, most of the ultralight hubs aren't freewheel hubs.
    You can get trick titanium cogs (not possible with freewheelers)
    With a freehub, the ease of chainline-manipulation becomes a big factor for people who toss things together at 2 am (like me)
    So really, unless you're set on using your WI freewheel eternally (like me) or just have this weird throwback to bmx stuff... there's no reason NOT to use freehub'd wheels.

    (they're becoming really popular and ubiquitously available for precisely those reasons, once Formula started making dishless, short-freehub'd hubs that can and DO get re-branded as anything under the sun, the freewheel gig was pretty much up)
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  4. #4
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    freehub:
    -Wider variety of high quality.
    -Generally easier to change gear ratios. With alot of them, you can get away with threading the lockring on by hand, which enables tool free cog changes.
    -A lot of freehubs can be removed with an allen wrench or two, some by hand (i think).


    freewheel:
    -Generally cheaper.
    -Only one option for high quality.
    -Need a heavy tool and wrench (or vice) to change.
    -Very simple.
    -You can find a replacement freewheel at just about any bike shop in the world.

  5. #5
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    I agree with byknuts. I really don't see any reason not to run a SS cassette hub. Changing out cogs and getting a straight chain line is easy. WI freewheels are expensive and lower quality freewheels suck (ACS are ok). My cheap rebranded Formula that came on my Redline works well enough, but I'm riding fixed now anyways so it's constant engagement for me! Your set up isn't bad by any means. If I were building up a new bling rear wheel I'd consider a freewheel hub with a WI freewheel uppose to a King/Hope freehub.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,699
    I think either option can be very good.

    When inquiring customers ask this question I tend to nudge them in the direction of the free hub wheels simply because they offer so much versatility. Want to experiment with gearing to find what suits you best? Great! buy a handful of cheap-o stamped cogs, get dialed in and plunk down the change for a nice wide based cog at that point. Decided maybe singlespeed just ain't your thang or you taco'd your rear wheel on the geary the day before a big race? Great, throw a cassette on there.

    I personally run a freewheel and probably will never change. I've found the gearing that I like and have a bomb proof wheel built around a freewheel specific hub. Currently awaiting a WI freewheel, but have been running ACS freewheels more or less trouble free. I've become very very good at overhauling them, but I'm looking forward to something a little more set and forget. It would be nice if White had some competition.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: badgermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    571

    Thanks for the replies...

    Many of the replies are along the lines of what I was thinking.

    I chose the WI freewheel route because I thought it would be more durable and the hub would be easier to service than a "more complex" newer, cassette body hub. I somehow liked the idea of engagement from the freewheel more than the freehub...who knows why...but it made sense to me then.

    I do like the idea of being able to mess with chainline...but I got mine set now and don't really see the need to change it again. I also am very happy with the 32X18 gear ratio.

    SO...a cassette body SS hub isn't really an upgrade over my curernt set up...at least it doesn't seem to be. At best, a lateral move.

    I think I'll stick with it.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    25
    I've always liked SS freewheel hubs because the wheel should be dish-less (or very nearly so), stronger and stable, a big plus in my book. I understand the conveniences of freehubs, but the unnecessary dish turns me off. That said, it doesn't seem to be an issue for all the users of freehubs, especially all the MTBers. I only ride on the road, but always carry a good load in one (left) pannier. I also build my own wheels, and an undished wheel is alot easier to build well.

  9. #9
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by jack in the matrix
    I've always liked SS freewheel hubs because the wheel should be dish-less (or very nearly so), stronger and stable, a big plus in my book. I understand the conveniences of freehubs, but the unnecessary dish turns me off. That said, it doesn't seem to be an issue for all the users of freehubs, especially all the MTBers. I only ride on the road, but always carry a good load in one (left) pannier. I also build my own wheels, and an undished wheel is alot easier to build well.

    SS freehubs do not require the wheel to be dished on a normal MTB frame.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,667
    I have a Surly hub with a WI freewheel. It's a solid, easy to maintain setup. I know it will work always.

    I also just purchased a DT 240s SS hub. Now that's a nice hub. I have an aversion to pawls and DT's star ratchet just looks and feels solid. Total engagement like a Detroit Locker. Super simple too.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azjonboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,671
    King's ring drive is nice and solid as well. DT is also great. For pure engagement, I9 takes the cake.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: badgermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    571

    More thoughts on the DT?

    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    I have a Surly hub with a WI freewheel. It's a solid, easy to maintain setup. I know it will work always.

    I also just purchased a DT 240s SS hub. Now that's a nice hub. I have an aversion to pawls and DT's star ratchet just looks and feels solid. Total engagement like a Detroit Locker. Super simple too.
    I'm curious to know how you thinkthe DT compares to the Surly set up. How long have you been riding the Surly?

    My wife's bike has Bonty hubs that are rebadged DT hubs. Those things have been solid for 3 years. NEVER needed adjustment. My Surly hubs are fairly new and really seem to enjoy loosening up. I can't seem to get the preload on the bearings right...so for now, I am running them a little tight in the hopes that they loosen up nicely.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,816
    One more plus for a freewheel is they work with the White Eno eccentric hub, which is my favorite tensioning system.

  14. #14
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by badgermtb
    I'm curious to know how you thinkthe DT compares to the Surly set up. How long have you been riding the Surly?

    My wife's bike has Bonty hubs that are rebadged DT hubs. Those things have been solid for 3 years. NEVER needed adjustment. My Surly hubs are fairly new and really seem to enjoy loosening up. I can't seem to get the preload on the bearings right...so for now, I am running them a little tight in the hopes that they loosen up nicely.

    Lot's of people rave about how wonderful the adjustable sealed bearings on the Surly hubs are, but I can't stand them. They work ok, but as you said, they do need to be adjusted. I've had non-adjustable sealed hubs last years without developing play. I really wish Surly offered an axle kit with stops, non-adjustable bearings and threaded spacers.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.