Frame choice- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Frame choice

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24

    Frame choice

    I am seriously considering aquiring or converting a singlespeed.

    Right now there are two bikes in my garage which don't get ridden a lot as is - and therefore might be good candidates for conversion. the first is a circa 1990 Ritchey P23 with 7sp components, the second is an early 2000's Trek 8500 hard tail.

    Any thoughts as to which one might be easier/better to convert? Both have vertical dropouts, the Trek is currently 8sp with a cassette and the std 42/32/22 front, while the Ritchey is 7sp and has a larger crank - 46/36/24. Neither frame is set up for discs, so I'll go V's.

    I'm in New England, so any help on appropriate gearing is helpful - Thinking of starting with around 32/20 or thereabouts.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    The need for singlespeed
    Reputation: zaskaranddriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    973
    The Ritchey's got more character and gets my nod.
    32/18 is a good starting point.
    I want pics when you're done.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,212
    It is easier and cheaper to put a single cog on a cassette wheel. I'm pretty sure you can put the cassette wheel on either bike.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  4. #4
    rebmem rbtm
    Reputation: alex_sdca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    179
    Ritchey for me as well. It's a great frame and can benefit from nice parts
    A white industries eno rear hub and re-lace the back wheel on that Ritchey. No chain tensioner needed.
    Use your current cranks and get a 34 tooth 110 BCD chainring from Salsa.
    Pair it with 19 tooth eno freewheel....something like that.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    842
    I'm in New England as well (Western Mass). Depending on where you are and your general SS fitness, a 32x21 or a 32x22 would be a good starting point.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ernesto_from_Wisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,004
    I'd go the Ritchey route. Awesome bike.

  7. #7
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    If you convert the Trek and give me the Ritchey I'll tell you a secret.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24
    LOL CB2 It would have to be a pretty good secret...

    You confirmed what I was leaning towards. My last hesitation is that it will be fully rigid, which is probably ok, as from what I've read, my mindset will have to change riding it. I will start off by simply changing out the middle ring in front for a Salsa 32, removing the granny but leave the big ring for now. Adding a SS conversion kit with a Salsa 22t. Removing derailleurs. Assuming that I like it enough, I might then look to modify some of the other parts such as the brakes (upgrade to V's) seat, cranks, and bars to something lighter and more modern.

  9. #9
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by nodima View Post
    LOL CB2 It would have to be a pretty good secret...

    You confirmed what I was leaning towards. My last hesitation is that it will be fully rigid, which is probably ok, as from what I've read, my mindset will have to change riding it. I will start off by simply changing out the middle ring in front for a Salsa 32, removing the granny but leave the big ring for now. Adding a SS conversion kit with a Salsa 22t. Removing derailleurs. Assuming that I like it enough, I might then look to modify some of the other parts such as the brakes (upgrade to V's) seat, cranks, and bars to something lighter and more modern.
    It is a really good one...

    Put a Mutanoraptor 2.4 on the front tubeless and you'll wonder what all the fuss about suspension forks is about (says the man who just put a 4" fork on the front of his bike).

    My first singlespeed was a '96 Stumpjumper. It was the last year they made a steel Stumpjumper. I called it my poor man's Ritchey because it was made of Tange Prestige and welded in Japan (Tange made Ritchey's tubing and he had them welded in Japan but did the final brazing and finish himself).


  10. #10
    The need for singlespeed
    Reputation: zaskaranddriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    973
    That's a beautiful machine, Charlie. What ever happened to it?

  11. #11
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    That's a beautiful machine, Charlie. What ever happened to it?
    I built it up as a HT and lent it to my B-I-L. Hopefully he hasn't done something stupid like pawn it.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    780
    Quote Originally Posted by nodima View Post
    LOL CB2 It would have to be a pretty good secret...

    You confirmed what I was leaning towards. My last hesitation is that it will be fully rigid, which is probably ok, as from what I've read, my mindset will have to change riding it. I will start off by simply changing out the middle ring in front for a Salsa 32, removing the granny but leave the big ring for now. Adding a SS conversion kit with a Salsa 22t. Removing derailleurs. Assuming that I like it enough, I might then look to modify some of the other parts such as the brakes (upgrade to V's) seat, cranks, and bars to something lighter and more modern.
    Rigid is the way to go with a SS. All power goes to the rear wheel. Just have to play with tire pressures and use your upper body and arms a little differently than you're probably used to
    Seeking MB-2 Fork (19.3), Ritchey FD post silver 26.8

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24

    Frankenbike rides again

    So I was able to acquire all the parts needed to convert the ole Ritchey into a SS. I went with 32x22 gearing, as a starting point. There was a lot more work than I thought to convert the frame, but I ran into some good luck here and there.

    Here is the sorta final product:



    I say sorta, because after not taking it for a ride, despite being all geared up (camelback tube clogged with the liner - but that is another story) I found an old wheelset in the garage so those are not in the pic.

    My riding buddies always used to call this bike the frankenbike, since it originally had the Alsop Frankenstem. It now has parts from several bikes and eras, most of which I still had in the tub o parts.

    Set Up:
    Ritchey P23
    XT hubs on Mavic 517's
    Velociraptor front, and Smoke Classic rear
    LX V Brakes
    super long Cannondale CODA bar ends
    Original seat, seatpost, and fork
    Avid Brake Levers
    Boss Cranks - Anyone know anything about these? The 32 tooth salsa chainring fit perfectly without needing shorter bolts, so I could run without the large ring or bash guard.
    Nashbar SS conversion kit
    Surly 22t cog
    SRAM chain

    One more pic of the bike


    One of the drivetrain


    Finally, the only thing that I don't like with the set up, which is the rear brake routing. The issue is the very small cable boss on the Ritchey, and when I asked the LBS, their thought was to run full housing zip tied to the frame. I would love to hear any solutions which are more elegant. Here is what I'm faced with - this is from the old cantilever brakes.



    Still looking forward to the inaugural ride, which should be this week.

  14. #14
    Schipperkes are cool.
    Reputation: banks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    4,153
    A correctly setup canti with Salmon Kool Stop pads will work as good as linear pull brake.

    You will have to install a "back stop" cable stop on the TT http://www.jbimporters.com/web/searc...fkawe45d9drh=4 the round looking things https://www.bti-usa.com/public/category/CC/CCAC# IRD
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  15. #15
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    I would just run a canti in the rear.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24
    Thanks guys, I was sorta hoping my days of cantis were over. I've never been able to get them adjusted so they work nearly as well as a V...and I've not really worked with/on them since about 1995. HA

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    931
    Hey, nice bike. What do you want to know about those sweet BOSS cranks? They are BMX cranks, made in California in the mid-90's. A close friend of mine was employed there and did a bunch of welding for them. They may even be cranks he made. I have read though that near the end BOSS was having profile make them. Oscar would know the whole story.

    Take it easy!

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by boostin View Post
    Hey, nice bike. What do you want to know about those sweet BOSS cranks? They are BMX cranks, made in California in the mid-90's. A close friend of mine was employed there and did a bunch of welding for them. They may even be cranks he made. I have read though that near the end BOSS was having profile make them. Oscar would know the whole story.

    Take it easy!
    Really, anything about em. Never seen them elsewhere. I got the bike in roughly 1993, and the cranks were on it then. At the time, I was in Tahoe, and bought it from a friend of a friend. Be interested to know more. Thanks.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    153
    I had those same bar ends on an old univega. Ended up cutting them down after I broke my arm on one in a bad wreck.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    931
    I'll see what info I can dredge up. I can probably tell you who made them once I talk to my buddy.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boostin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    931
    Does the spindle look like a regular Profile spindle? If it does, then they are def. made by Profile. In 93 they were all being done there. If the spindle looks different they are original Carlo cranks and the spindle is basically a one off to fit those crank arms and is not replacable. Around that time Dans Comp was selling a batch of BOSS cranks that were inferior and snapped easily. If yours haven't snapped by now its safe to say you don't have a set from that batch, not that they could be replaced now.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    24
    It looks just like the ones on this link: BOSS cranks - BMX Society community forums

    Mine lack the "team" decal on the bottom of one arm though.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by zaskaranddriver View Post
    The Ritchey's got more character and gets my nod.
    32/18 is a good starting point.
    I want pics when you're done.
    I have to agree, the Ritchey just looks kinda cool.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.