Fork tuning for efficient standing climbs- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Fork tuning for efficient standing climbs

    Suspended SS rigs are different than other bikes b/c riders spend more time standing during climbs. I'm wondering how riders tune their forks so standing climbs don't become energy-sucking bob fests.

    The clever answer is "LOCKOUT - DUH!" but I've recently found slowing the rebound a lot makes my standing climbs feel great, especially at high speed, and don't feel the need to lockout as often. I've got 5" of front squish so the fork packing down and bottoming out on descents isn't really an issue.

  2. #2
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    Well, you can run too much rebound damping, like you currently are, and get slightly more efficiency on the uphills while having your fork suck on the descents. Or get a simple remote lock-out switch, mount it to your bars and have the best of both worlds.
    Up to you, but I know which way I'd go.

  3. #3
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    I just reach down and adjust my compression real quick, then flip it back to where it was. Remote lock-outs are nice too. Use to run the pop-lock adjust on my rebate.

  4. #4
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    I'm addicted to the Rockshox X-loc button. If you've got a rock shox reba, you could buy an x-loc damper. Not the cheapest way, but probably the most efficient.
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  5. #5
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    I have a reba 100 rlt and I just reach down and lock out on the climbs. The lock out knobs on the reba's are simple enough to just reach down and turn.

  6. #6
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    On my Reba, sometimes i'll just lock it out the entire ride and fine tune the floodgate to open just past the force i use to stand and mash. Doesn't do much for the small bumps like this. It will take the sharpness out of bigger hits and fast chatter, though.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138 View Post
    I'm addicted to the Rockshox X-loc button. If you've got a rock shox reba, you could buy an x-loc damper. Not the cheapest way, but probably the most efficient.
    I already have the X-loc ('11 Reba XX) and the floodgate threshold is maxed. But it still bounces some and makes the front end ride high. After a couple rides, I became resigned that I'd be sitting on most climbs (I'm on a 1X9 but am trying to ride it like my rigid SS).

    Cranking up the rebound compression last night (and taking 10psi out of negative fork) felt great, descents felt good, and less x-loc toggling. I actually started wondering if I could remove the x-loc! I'm still tweaking the fork's PSIs and yesterday maxed out my chainstay length (my weight was too rearward), so I'm still experimenting. But I recall that I also slowed the rebound on a softtail I had a couple years back b/c I found it made the front end sit and be quiet instead of bobbing w/my pedal strokes.

  8. #8
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    It should be a pretty stiff lockout... I had a customer at the shop with a similar issue, and, at SRAM's recommendation, I added 5ml of oil at a time to the damper side of the fork until it felt solid. Took 10mL in addition to what was in there before it felt right.
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  9. #9
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    I use shortest travel as possible to get 70 degree head tube angle.

    Lock-out still the best for energy saving, but if you can make advantage of the suspension by using the bounce it's great too. I used to bounce with my front leg to lift my body and rear leg and hammer all the way down while pushing my handle bar forward - but that's for steep climb.

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