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  1. #1
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    First proper SS ride.

    I finally had the chance to go out yesterday and break in the new conversion. The weather hadn't been cooperating and the trails here in North Texas were closed.

    Right off the bat the first thing that I noticed was the ease at which you could pedal. I'm running a 32x16 combo right now and I didn't expect it to be that smooth. If you're running that combo on a geared bike you're gonna struggle a bit taking off and climbing. The whole simplicity of it all and the fact that there was no noise other than the unavoidable air sucking left a permanent grin on my face

    My buddy was riding with me on this one, he had a geared Rockhopper. Even he noticed a pep in my step, a fire under my ass, the proverbial pedal to the metal as I left him in the dust. There's nothing more satisfying than smoking a guy with way more gears than you or climbing a nasty section only to look back and see your partner walking it up.

    Finally, the post visit to the bike shop for adjustments... didn't need it. Other than a minor mishap, my own fault, the ride was a great new experience for me and taped new levels of endurance and stamina unknown to myself before yesterday. I'd like to thank everyone and anyone that has ever posted on this forum for inspiring me to convert. I'd also like to thank you for taking the time to read my thoughts as I'm sure you have better things to do. Time to drink a beer!

    Gotta love those platforms
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    The ride
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    32x16??? Geez, you must be a beast. I just dropped my rear from 20 to 18 and am having trouble making the adjustment. Can't seem to take off from the tops of whoops and in the tight curvy sections I just cant accelerate the way I used to.

    Lose those platforms.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  3. #3
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    Shin burgers.

  4. #4
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    OUCH!!!!
    Glad you're having a blast on the SS. Now put some peroxide on that wound, stat!
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  5. #5
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    DParks: Is 32x16 unusual? Keep in mind though that the trails here in Texas are relatively flat. The few climbs we do have are rather short.

    robbyracer: I did, and it burned like the dikens!
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  6. #6
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    32/16 is very common with 26" wheels.

    I go a little lower because some of my short climbs are a little steep and I am not all that fit.

    Higher gearing may actually help sometimes, if you have the possibility to pick up momentum before a short climb.

    Run whatever gearing seems to work for you.

    Have you considered clipless pedals? They often help me get up that last part of the hill. ... and they make sure I don't slip off of my pedals

  7. #7
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    Have you considered clipless pedals?
    I've never really given it much thought. I know they help you climb and just ride faster in general but I've just always been paranoid about being locked in. I've seen my friend eat it too many times because he couldn't get out fast enough.
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  8. #8
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    Yep: clipless is not compulsory Lots of people find that they work for them. Others: maybe not. Another case of "do what seems best for you" (but keep your eyes open for alternatives).

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  10. #10
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    I guess it is all in what your trails are like. I would like to go 32x16 for my ride to and from the trails but then I wouldn't be able to ride the trails. I'm also on a 29er. My excuse of more unsprung weight is my way of saying "I'm a little *****." The unsprung weight thing sounds better, though.

    I watched a buddy go OTB the other day and he unclipped with plenty of time. It gets to be second nature. I'd probably still try to go heel out to unclip even if I were on platforms.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  11. #11
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    A few thoughts.

    1. If you are worried about being "stuck" to the bike, toe steps are the last thing you want.

    2. Your buddy should adjust the tension and or lube his clipless pedals if he continually gets trapped in them. If he is still getting stuck after that, he might want to consider changing brands. I had some Ritchie road SPDs a few years back that were death traps. Swapped to Speedplys and nothin but love for their pedals on the roadie now.

    3. You might want to consider remving a link from your chain. You only have it wrapped around a third of that cog right now. It could possibly skip a tooth in high torque situations.

    4. Welcome to the flock and have fun!
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  12. #12
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    I'd probably still try to go heel out to unclip even if I were on platforms.
    Hey DParks, what is meant by this?

    You might want to consider remving a link from your chain
    I honestly don't think I can afford to remove another link. When I shortened it initially it seemed that was as short as I could make it. I don't know, I'll check it out again tonight. Would that explain my gear ratio?
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  13. #13
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    The movement to get out of clipless pedals is "heel away from bike". I usually do it as a bigger move: more than just my ankle twisting, I push with my whole leg.

    I think removing a whole link would make the chain too short. A "half link" might, or might not, give you perfect chain length, if you want to get into that. It doesn't do anything to the gear ratio. Gear ratio is simple math: divide the number of chainring teeth with number of rear cog teeth.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    Hey DParks, what is meant by this?

    I honestly don't think I can afford to remove another link. When I shortened it initially it seemed that was as short as I could make it. I don't know, I'll check it out again tonight. Would that explain my gear ratio?
    In answer to your first question, he is referring to the twisting motion used to remove your foot from a clipless pedal. It truly does become second nature.

    To answer your second question, the gear ratio is determined by the number of teeth on each gear. You are currently running a two to one ratio (32/16). If your trails are pretty flat, that is probably a good start point on a 26er.

    The issue with the tensioner set up is that you are only engaging about five teeth on the rear cog at any given time. This has no effect on ratio, but does open the door to drivetrain skipping. If you can't remoove any links, you might consider using the tensioner in the push up mode.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  15. #15
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    Awesome, this is some good info guys. I'll break my chain tonight and try to remove a link, if it's too short I'll go and get a half link from the LBS. If that fails I'll see what I can do about running that tensioner in push-up mode.
    Maybe it's time to consider going clipless. I'll keep that on the back burner for now.
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  16. #16
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    You can first try eyeballing the chain, without cutting it. See if it gets even close to joinable length when you make a sharp bend in the chain. Something like this: _A_

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    You can first try eyeballing the chain, without cutting it. See if it gets even close to joinable length when you make a sharp bend in the chain. Something like this: _A_
    Obviously try this without the chain tensioner, right?
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  18. #18
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    Yep, bypass the tensioner and see how close you get when you try to eliminate the length of one link.

    I suspect you don't have enough slack to take out a whole link. Halflink, maybe.

  19. #19
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    Hey Jess,
    I've been riding clipless for years, once I tried it there was no going back. You might want to give it a shot. Check out the Crank Bros Candy ones. They release pretty quick but hold tight when you need them to. They were too loose for my taste but others have had great luck with them.
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  20. #20
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    There are a couple of auctions on fleabay for some Crank Bros. Candy, but there is a C and a SL. The "C" type seem to be the more inexpensive model so I'm going to watch that auction. Also there is one that doesn't have the cleats included, are these hard to find or expensive? I don't really want to spend a whole lot of money on these since it's going to be my first time using them. But if I can get a good deal on some decent ones then I'll pony over the dough.
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  21. #21
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    Cleats are not hard to find, not sure about cost. Every pedal brand has different ones.

    If you go clipless, you'll also need cycling shoes that accept cleats.

    Lots of people do great with Shimano 520 or 540 pedals.
    I am really happy with my Time pedals.

  22. #22
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    Yep, bypass the tensioner and see how close you get when you try to eliminate the length of one link.

    I suspect you don't have enough slack to take out a whole link. Halflink, maybe.
    perttime: The chain came really close to being able to remove an entire link. I'm sure it would have been way too tight though. So I'm definitely thinking half link.

    If you can't remoove any links, you might consider using the tensioner in the push up mode.
    I tried this but could not for the life of me figure out how to change it to push-up mode. Somebody told me you could do by flipping the spring around or something. If anyone has any idea how to do this please let me know.
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  23. #23
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    What tensioner is it? Some spring loaded tensioners can be reversed but not all (don't remember which specifically). I use a tensioner that has no spring: I just tighten it in position with a bolt.

    On some frames, the chain stay may get in the way of pushing the chain up.

    Which way the tensioner pushes is not all that important if you get the chain to near-perfect length. But if you have a chance to get the chain to engage more teeth in the rear, it is better for distributing the loads on the cog.

  24. #24
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    Hey J3ss...I have the exact experience. I converted my 26' gear to SS w/ tensioner two weeks ago. gearing 32x16. I could not believe how natural it feel. I tried SS last year by removing the rear derailuer and shorting the chain without changing the cassette. I know i know. Anyway, i hated it then because my back and knee would hurt. However, this time around, the riding experience was awesome. Matter of fact, i did something i would never ever imagine i could do. I did a 12h solo SS race this past weekend. My goal was to do as many mile as possible. The longer i did on gear bike was 55 mi. I did 93mi on this race. Unbelievable!! I am hook on SS. A lot of people tell me it's even better on 29er. We'll see.

  25. #25
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    What tensioner is it? Some spring loaded tensioners can be reversed but not all (don't remember which specifically). I use a tensioner that has no spring: I just tighten it in position with a bolt.

    On some frames, the chain stay may get in the way of pushing the chain up.

    Which way the tensioner pushes is not all that important if you get the chain to near-perfect length. But if you have a chance to get the chain to engage more teeth in the rear, it is better for distributing the loads on the cog.
    I use a Forte spring loaded tensioner. I'm sure after I install the half-link I won't need it anymore though.

    snellville: Dude, that is awesome! 93 miles is insane, congrats. Yeah, I hear the same thing about the 29ers. If all goes well this year I may be investing in one, they look fun.
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    You might want to keep the tensioner and replace that full link with a half-link. if your chain is too tight it will put extra stress on the entire drive train. I got mine pretty close to a "magic gear" but kept the tensioner. It took up just enough slack that there wasn't undue pressure on the drivetrain and it kept the chain from coming off the chainring through really bumpy sections.

    From the picture I can't tell if you are using a cog from an old cassette or a SS or BMX cog. If you are just using a cassette cog then it is worth the whole $5 it will cost to switch to a single cog. The teeth are longer and it will keep the chain from slipping when applying a lot of torque.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  27. #27
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    I also like my Time pedals & after decades without a bike confidence is getting higher.

  28. #28
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    Lots of people do great with Shimano 520 or 540 pedals
    I actually just won a fleBay auction for some 520's. After shipping they were $25, not sure if they have cleats though.
    I also like my Time pedals
    Those time pedals ARE nice, but way more than I'm willing to spend right now.

    As far as my chain goes I went out and bought a half link today. Unfortunately my chain breaker tool broke while trying to put the chain back on...funny. Do half links come in different sizes? It seems the one I purchased doesn't fit well on my 8 speed chain. Perhaps it's time to buy a SS specific chain as well.

    From the picture I can't tell if you are using a cog from an old cassette or a SS or BMX cog.
    Yeah, that's actually a SS cog. The teeth are pretty tall on it. My chain ring on the other hand is ramped...yet another thing to buy.
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    Geez, it's like having a wife, isn't it? There's always one more thing to get or do.

    What I can't figure out is how when we were kids we rode a $100 50 pound bike from wal-mart and never cleaned the chain or trued the rims or adjusted the deraileurs and they worked just fine. When they stopped shifting right you just had a ghetto single speed. When the wheels got out of true, you just removed the brake. When you got a big cut like you did it was healed by the time you got home. Those were the good old days. Now everything costs alot and when you fall you hurt for days.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  30. #30
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    There's different half links for different chain widths. 9 speed, 8 speed, ...

  31. #31
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    Your half link is most likely for a BMX chain. Ask at the bike shop. BMX chains are wider than 8 spd chains which are wider than 9 spd chains. I'm running BMX chain on my Surly and on my roadie SS. They work great. If your rear cog is SS specific, it does have taller teeth than a cassette cog. That helps with the chain skipping issue.

    Is the chainring on the front also SS specific? I ran a similar set up to yours w/a ramped chainring up front when I started SS and found that the chain would pop off of the front ring in choppy sections due to the ramps and shorter teeth on the chainring. I now run SS specific stuff on all of my SS bikes. SS is supposed to be more simple. If your stopping to fix your SS bike like I was every few rides, then it's defeating the purpose.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  32. #32
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by DParks
    I watched a buddy go OTB the other day and he unclipped with plenty of time. It gets to be second nature. I'd probably still try to go heel out to unclip even if I were on platforms.
    I actually did this yesterday in a new rock garden. I was able to clip out fast enough to land on my feet, catch the bike, and walk out with it above my head making manly grunt sounds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57
    I actually did this yesterday in a new rock garden. I was able to clip out fast enough to land on my feet, catch the bike, and walk out with it above my head making manly grunt sounds.
    Haha! That is awesome I AM A MAN!!!
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  34. #34
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    Geez, it's like having a wife, isn't it? There's always one more thing to get or do
    HeHe, im not married but I can only imagine this is what it's like. The thing about the bike though, you can ride it whenever you want....Booya!

    Frozenspokes: No, my front chainring is ramped. So far I haven't had any issues with it though, in due time I suppose. I'll eventually upgrade that as well.
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  35. #35
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    the 520's are great pedals. I've been running them for about 4.5 years now without a problem. Every once in a while, i'll lube the clip mechanism and adjust the bearings. Pretty easy to do. I kept telling myself i'd replace them with xtr's when these finally die, but i dont see that happening anytime soon. Plus i have a spare pair from my old geared bike, so i'm set for another 5 years, easy.
    Just a note, when putting your cleats on the shoes, the position is VERY important. too far forward or back and it'll be a PITA to clip in or out. The tread on the shoe can also interfere. It might be beneficial to have someone knowledgable with setting them up help you out (NOT your buddies who keep crashing because they cant get out). When set up correctly, they are the bee's knees.

  36. #36
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    ISAR: thanks for the tip. As soon as I purchase some shoes I'll get them set up with the LBS. Do you have any experience with Crank Brothers Candy pedals? I inadvertently won a eBay auction for them as well.

    Update: I installed the half-link and it was almost perfect. I'll still have to use the tensioner to get my chain right. I also went ahead and purchased a SS specific chain....In LIME GREEN!!!
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    ISAR: thanks for the tip. As soon as I purchase some shoes I'll get them set up with the LBS. Do you have any experience with Crank Brothers Candy pedals? I inadvertently won a eBay auction for them as well.

    Update: I installed the half-link and it was almost perfect. I'll still have to use the tensioner to get my chain right. I also went ahead and purchased a SS specific chain....In LIME GREEN!!!
    My only experience with them is my friends keep breaking them lol
    I think the M520 is a much more stout pedal, but some people do prefer the extra float the crank brothers offer. Personally, i dont like float, so SPD's work better. Give them both a shot i guess.

  38. #38
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    Shimano clipless fan here too. I have heard lots of storys about CB pedals breaking, but never witnessed it myself. I have also read many storys about great customer service from CB as well. I have used shimano clipess pedals for over a decade now. My original pair finally gave up the ghost last summer (more due to negligence on my part than any fault with the pedal).

    Lime green chain! Cool!
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    HeHe, im not married but I can only imagine this is what it's like. The thing about the bike though, you can ride it whenever you want....Booya!
    Well played, sir, well played!
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  40. #40
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    I ride with someone with Crank Brothers pedals. Seems like he always has issues with them breaking (one within two months of purchase!). I've worn out a pair of SPD's over the course of a decade or so, but I've never broken one. Of course, I don't have the weight that some of you guys have.

  41. #41
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    Well went out today for another epic SS ride. This time I did about 20miles and I quite literally fell off my 32x16 high horse. I rode a more difficult and technical trail this time and quickly realized how crucial having the appropriate gear is. That trail really broke me off but it was still undoubtedly fun. Here are some shots I took with my phone ( I don't have a cool, fancy camera)... On a side note I'd like to take my hat to you crazy dudes that ride rigid. I locked out my fork for part of the ride today and it felt like I was going to get bucked off every time I hit a rock. Also my elbows hurt I don't know how you guys do it, you are true cowboys...oh and cowgirls too.

    Yeah, I'm pretty excited about trying out these clipless pedals, I keep slipping of my platforms at the most crucial times.

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  42. #42
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    haha yea, i've bitten off more than i can chew with gearing sometimes. 32-17 or 32-18 are a good gear to start with. I ride a 32-17 and race a 32-18 (or at least i did).

  43. #43
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    That's a good looking Scott! What's the saddle on that bike? Thanks.

  44. #44
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    aint a man till you ride 36:16 on the Texas trails


    anyways , I have modified that same sette tensioner to pushup mode but it is not great, id recommend getting a surly singulator
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  45. #45
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    I still second the singleator! Install it and forget it. Oh yeah and the Shimano clipless pedals. I've been running them for years, no problem.

    Man I wish I could push a 32-18 here. There ain't much flat so I'm running a 32-20. Sucks on the street but it's great on the trails.
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  46. #46
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    When you put the clipless pedals on the bike, first get the hang of getting into and out of them somewhere where falling only hurts your ego. Definitely not in front of some college girls, though

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    That's a good looking Scott! What's the saddle on that bike?
    Hey thanks. It's just the stock saddle, the specs sheet call it a SCT-10 SL Aspect 09.

    I have modified that same sette tensioner to pushup mode but it is not great, id recommend getting a surly singulator
    Thanks for the info Nuck. So the only real reason to run a tensioner in push-up mode is to get more chain on the cog? It doesn't affect the actual chain tension?

    Definitely not in front of some college girls, though
    Funny you should say that...I live near the University of North Texas campus

    So I'll definitely have to experiment with different cogs for different trails, it's a good thing they aren't very expensive.
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    Thanks for the info Nuck. So the only real reason to run a tensioner in push-up mode is to get more chain on the cog? It doesn't affect the actual chain tension?
    Yea, more chain wrap around the cog is good. It prevents chain skip.

    A tip for the pedals.... dont tense up your ankle when you try to unclip. just move your leg out, and since your clip is in the front of your foot, it'll rotate and naturally come unclipped. You only fall when you try to pull your foot straight up or straight to the side.
    You'll laugh at how easy they are, it becomes like second nature pretty quickly.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    Hey thanks. It's just the stock saddle, the specs sheet call it a SCT-10 SL Aspect 09.

    Thanks for the info Nuck. So the only real reason to run a tensioner in push-up mode is to get more chain on the cog? It doesn't affect the actual chain tension?

    Funny you should say that...I live near the University of North Texas campus

    So I'll definitely have to experiment with different cogs for different trails, it's a good thing they aren't very expensive.
    well when you do a jump the tensioner pushing up on the chain moves down when you land(talking bout maybe a 1-2 foot drop) its not much of a problem because I dont know of anyone who pedals while in the air. the pushdown tensioner doesnt really move when you land , its is useful when you dont have so much slack in the chain . the surly comes with two springs , one that pushes up and another that pushes down
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nuck_chorris
    well when you do a jump the tensioner pushing up on the chain moves down when you land(talking bout maybe a 1-2 foot drop) its not much of a problem because I dont know of anyone who pedals while in the air. the pushdown tensioner doesnt really move when you land , its is useful when you dont have so much slack in the chain . the surly comes with two springs , one that pushes up and another that pushes down
    Yea, i always used mine in push down mode without any issues, because my frame didnt lend itself to push up mode very well. Chain stays were in the way. It worked fine though. I think i had less issues with that than with any other sort of chain tensioning device. EBB's slipped and made noice, sliding dropouts slip, horizontal dropouts slip backwards when you hit the brakes, and the list goes on.

  51. #51
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    - A single speed chain isn't needed, and usually they're heavier and weaker than a good 8 spd chain. Yes, it's lime green, but just stick with a good old SRAM PC 870.

    -By far the best way to add a half link is to buy two of these:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...ss_T15_product
    And one of these in 3/32:
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...s.php?id=22297
    It's by far the strongest way to add a half link, and you don't need to worry about pressing pins back into your chain (which you shouldn't do) and the half link being too wide (which all of them are used with a Shimano or SRAM chain).

    -Forget a sprung tensioner and get a rigid one, like this:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/170...-Tensioner.htm
    or this:
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/151...-Tensioner.htm
    Springs belong on geared bikes or suspension single speeds. There's no reason to have one on a hardtail single speed, and plenty of reasons not to.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    Yea, i always used mine in push down mode without any issues, because my frame didnt lend itself to push up mode very well. Chain stays were in the way. It worked fine though. I think i had less issues with that than with any other sort of chain tensioning device. EBB's slipped and made noice, sliding dropouts slip, horizontal dropouts slip backwards when you hit the brakes, and the list goes on.
    The chainstay was a big issue whenever I tried to use a 36:18 ratio , not enough space to hold up the chain. this is to OP , if you get a surly singulator , dont over tighten the spring because you will bend the nub that fits in the pinhole and will break the spring(dont ask how I know).
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  53. #53
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    I have a Rennen tensioner and it is a solid product. The only real drawback is you have to unbolt the tensioner from the frame for wheel removal. I guess removing the quick release would work, instead, but my hub is bolt-on.

  54. #54
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    So I received my Shimano pedals the other day. I still don't have shoes though, still looking for a good, cheap pair.
    However I did find a bargain on a Truvativ Stylo crankset on Craigslist. I only paid $50 and it included the bottom bracket.
    So now I have a SS specific chain ring, crankset and chain. Here's what it looks like so far...

    Oh and still can't figure out how to make the tensioner go into push-up mode.



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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    So I received my Shimano pedals the other day. I still don't have shoes though, still looking for a good, cheap pair.
    However I did find a bargain on a Truvativ Stylo crankset on Craigslist. I only paid $50 and it included the bottom bracket.
    So now I have a SS specific chain ring, crankset and chain. Here's what it looks like so far...

    Oh and still can't figure out how to make the tensioner go into push-up mode.



    You cant without make some...adjustments. I took off the C clip and removed the spring , then I grinded down a little spot behind the thread on the Allen bolt so it would fit in the derailleur hanger threads (you don't have to do this if you get some spacers and put them accordingly ) then I grinded the main body just for the raw aluminum look . at the end i put it all together without the spring and the c clip. I wish I had some pictures to show you it. it didnt work too well . something I didnt try was using a ziptie to hold it up
    "If women don't find handsome , they should at least find you handy."-Red Green

  56. #56
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    Lookin' good, Jess
    Did you tensioner come with a "push up" spring? I got the Surly one and it came with two springs. It was a ***** to change but now it's in the "push up" position.
    Check Performance or Nashbar for some decent cheap shoes. I got some of the basic 3 strap Specialized shoes at the LBS and they've served me well.
    Robb
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  57. #57
    local trails rider
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    It is quite possible that the Forte tensioner can only push down. Couldn't find the details...

    But .... if it is working, don't worry about it too much. Go ride your bike

  58. #58
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    I'm with badmech on this one, ditch the spring driven tensioners and get a Rennen style. The spring tensioners really don't work all that well and if you're going to have to spend some money to get a pusher, then I would just skip buying one after another of the same device. Our rides out here consist of riding uphill for an hour or two, then across, then back down. So you get to know if a tensioner is going to let you skip. Personally, I skipped the tensioner alley and went for the eccentric eno hub. But don't do that until you really like single speeding, which you probably do already
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    My only experience with them is my friends keep breaking them lol
    I think the M520 is a much more stout pedal, but some people do prefer the extra float the crank brothers offer. Personally, i dont like float, so SPD's work better. Give them both a shot i guess.

    i ride with crank brothers eggbeaters and love them. they do have a lot of float but i works for me. i dont know if your question about the price of cleats got answered or not but you can get them for about $20 at any lbs.

  60. #60
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    If you aren't having issues with your current setup, don't sweat it. If it becomes a problem, you know what to do.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  61. #61
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    i've tried alot of shoes, and the best ones i've gotten so far are the shimano md86. Every other pair i've tried lasted me maybe 6 months at best. These ones i've had for about a year and they're still great. I got them on sale somewhere for like $60.

  62. #62
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    Lookin' good, Jess
    Did you tensioner come with a "push up" spring?
    Hey thanks man. No it didn't come with a push-up spring. I'm just gonna follow Frozenspokes and perttime's advice and just ride. No issues so far so why fix what isn't broken right?
    I found a pair of beaten up old MTB shoes with cleats for $10. So right after work I'm gonna go test out this clipless thing. I'll report back this evening.
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
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  63. #63
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    I'm hooked! Or should I say clipped .....bombed? Ok. Clipless is awesome. I cleared stuff that I couldn't do before and the stuff I did before was a cake walk. Believe it or not I actually had more trouble getting into the pedals than I did getting out of them. The left one seemed fine but the right side just wouldn't go in, any idea why?
    P.S. I almost had a couple of 0mph falls but somehow I got out in the nick of time. The other time a tree saved me.
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    I'm hooked! Or should I say clipped .....bombed? Ok. Clipless is awesome. I cleared stuff that I couldn't do before and the stuff I did before was a cake walk. Believe it or not I actually had more trouble getting into the pedals than I did getting out of them. The left one seemed fine but the right side just wouldn't go in, any idea why?
    P.S. I almost had a couple of 0mph falls but somehow I got out in the nick of time. The other time a tree saved me.
    check to see if the cleats are positioned in the same spot on each shoe, and make sure the rubber of the shoe sole isnt keeping the cleat from engaging properly by hitting the pedal. Also, have you adjusted the tension of the pedals? Make sure they're the same for both pedals, and both sides of each pedal. Make sure you turn the screw the right way as well. Might need to read instructions for that.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding
    check to see if the cleats are positioned in the same spot on each shoe, and make sure the rubber of the shoe sole isnt keeping the cleat from engaging properly by hitting the pedal. Also, have you adjusted the tension of the pedals? Make sure they're the same for both pedals, and both sides of each pedal. Make sure you turn the screw the right way as well. Might need to read instructions for that.
    Cleats in the same spot: Check
    Rubber not in the way: Check
    Adjusted tension: Negative, don't know how and there were no instructions.
    Thanks for the help ISAR.
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
    Bearded Women Racing

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    Cleats in the same spot: Check
    Rubber not in the way: Check
    Adjusted tension: Negative, don't know how and there were no instructions.
    Thanks for the help ISAR.
    That's probably it. There should be a hex head (for an allen wrench) on each side of each pedal, kinda near the middle of the cage, on the top, i believe. There should be a little + and _ marked on each side of the screw to tell you which way to turn it. Just play with it to get it where yuou want it, and there should be a red indicator tab so you can make sure they're all the same. Full loose probably wouldnt be a bad place to start while you're learning. Also, throw some lube on them around the mechanisms. This really helps if/when they start acting up.

  67. #67
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    Ok, I see what you're talking about. I'll mess around with it for the next few days and see where I'm at. Thanks again ISAR....do you really suck at riding?
    The unexamined life is not worth living - Socrates
    Bearded Women Racing

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by J3SSEB
    Ok, I see what you're talking about. I'll mess around with it for the next few days and see where I'm at. Thanks again ISAR....do you really suck at riding?
    No problem, and yea, i constantly get smoked by the elderly on their Rascal ScootersŪ

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