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  1. #1
    Waiting to exhale.
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    Ever had a steel frame rust on you?

    If so how and what did it take to make your frame rust? I may be moving to a ocean city in a few years and I am just wondering if I should even risk taking a steel frame and riding it there or should I start to save up for ti?

    I understand that with the right maintenance and protection my frame should be ok but, I have lived on the island of Okinawa Japan for almost 5 years and I had one hell of a time keeping my Harley-D motorcycle from turning into a rust bucket.
    Quite possibly the slowest single speeder on earth.
    Now skating 'cause its cheaper.

  2. #2
    hands up who wants to die
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    Framesaver on the inside; spraycan of clearcoat for those big scratches on the outside. You should be fine for a few decades unless you leave the bike outside every night.

    -r

  3. #3
    i like to bicycle
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    my bonti cross

    i beat the tar out of my bonti cross for season after season. i did a good job of keeping it clean tho. they salt the roads around here and i know it was exposed to plenty of that. i keep a coat of wax on all my bikes. i did remove some rust from the bonti down in the crotch of the chain stays. remove repaint all good. i've never seen rust on my 2 fat citys, both are nearly 10 years old.

    i'd say go for it and just keep it faily clean and dry when your not on board.

  4. #4
    SUBLIM8er
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    Here's the thing to watch for: water that accumulates inside the frame. I had this happen to me with my second bike, a Stumpjumper. If you have any of those expansion holes on your frame (usually found on the rear of the chain and seatstays) they will admit moisture. Sometimes enough (as in deep creakcrossings) to pool up as happened to me with my Stumpy. The rust was so bad that it eventually ate through the bottom of the chainstay near the bottom bracket. But, in the end it all turned out for the best. Speacialized sent me a spanking new Stumpy and it's going strong in it's reincarnation as a SS. I used Framesaver the second time around, of course.

  5. #5
    Candlestick Maker
    Reputation: baker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axis II
    Here's the thing to watch for: water that accumulates inside the frame. I had this happen to me with my second bike, a Stumpjumper. If you have any of those expansion holes on your frame (usually found on the rear of the chain and seatstays) they will admit moisture. Sometimes enough (as in deep creakcrossings) to pool up as happened to me with my Stumpy. The rust was so bad that it eventually ate through the bottom of the chainstay near the bottom bracket. But, in the end it all turned out for the best. Speacialized sent me a spanking new Stumpy and it's going strong in it's reincarnation as a SS. I used Framesaver the second time around, of course.
    I had the same rust prob on my wife's RockHopper. Not very many season's of use, but it rusted out on both chainstays. The bike was used often for transportation and sat outside a lot. No effort at rust prevention was made...

    baker

  6. #6
    True American Cyclist
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    I've never had a steel frame rust out. My new bikes that I really care about get treated with Framesaver. I have steel beater bikes that are older than I am (30 years), with NO signs of internal rust. i periodically allow the moisture to drain or evaporate from the tubes...Rust is only a myth if'n you take care of your frame.
    "Cars - R - Coffins"

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwills
    i beat the tar out of my bonti cross for season after season. i did a good job of keeping it clean tho. they salt the roads around here and i know it was exposed to plenty of that. i keep a coat of wax on all my bikes. i did remove some rust from the bonti down in the crotch of the chain stays. remove repaint all good. i've never seen rust on my 2 fat citys, both are nearly 10 years old.

    i'd say go for it and just keep it faily clean and dry when your not on board.
    What kind of wax do you apply on the outside of the frame?

  8. #8
    i like to bicycle
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    meguiars

    Quote Originally Posted by -kelly-
    What kind of wax do you apply on the outside of the frame?
    i go automotive when it comes to cleaning and polishing and waxing. they make a spray applied wax which is nice for a quick shine. otherwise their high-end liquid wax, rubbing compounds, etc. like i said, the paint on my 10year old FATS looks pretty darn good still. the soulcrafts came frame savered for internal protection. otherwise i've treated the FATS periodically with linseed oil.

  9. #9
    Designated Bleeder
    Reputation: SpecialK's Avatar
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    Steel Rusting?

    I wholeheartedly agree with the Frame-Saver sprayed on the inside of the frame. Most bike shops will be able to do that for you if you want.

    As for the outside, make sure there are no spots where the paint has been completely taken off, scratches, digs, etc. If you do, just get some automotive touch up paint and paint over the chipped or scratch. Also, remember to clean you rig when it gets nasty and dry it off! A wet steel bike is what is going to rust.

    And don't go Ti. Steel, as the they say, is real.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    what exactly is frame saver and where can you buy it?

  11. #11
    paintbucket
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    Don't sweat surface rust

    Before:
    <img src ="https://forum.bikemag.com/photopost/data/500/1212compgs-med.jpg">

    After:
    <img src ="https://forum.bikemag.com/photopost/data/500/1212compgs2-med.jpg">
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  12. #12
    SUBLIM8er
    Reputation: Axis II's Avatar
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    Framesaver helps a lot but it's not a panacea. The problem with framesaver is that it's almost imposible to achieve an even distribution of the stuff on the hard to reach surfaces that exist inside a frame. I had a shop do my last two steel frames and found that the application was very uneven and that some spots were not covered at all and who knows what things look like in the really tough to reach areas like the bottom of the seatstays, the rear ofthe chainstays, etc., etc.

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