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Thread: ENO Free/Fixi?

  1. #1
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    ENO Free/Fixi?

    Santa, AKA my fiance, came through with an ENO ecc. I can't quite tell from the W.I. site but it looks like the hub is threaded for two freewheels. I'm a track cog noob, so what do you use for a lock ring if it is not threaded for a track specific ring. Are some of the BB lock rings threaded right hand for use with a track cog on a freewheel threaded hub. Or does one side of the ENO have threads for a track cog?
    Thanks Fellas (and ladies if you are out there).
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    Santa, AKA my fiance, came through with an ENO ecc. I can't quite tell from the W.I. site but it looks like the hub is threaded for two freewheels. I'm a track cog noob, so what do you use for a lock ring if it is not threaded for a track specific ring. Are some of the BB lock rings threaded right hand for use with a track cog on a freewheel threaded hub. Or does one side of the ENO have threads for a track cog?
    Thanks Fellas (and ladies if you are out there).

    the Eno hub is threaded on both sides, but one side is also threaded for a lockring. You could thread on two freewheels or a freewheel and a track cog. Your Choice. The threading on the track cog side is obviously not as deep as the freewheel only side.


    Very cool hubs
    ray

  3. #3
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    not the same

    There is one side for a free wheel and one side for a fixxie cog. They are not the same size, I don't think, and would not be appropriate for two freewheels.


    A freewheel takes a lot of load and wants full thread to stay put and to prevent destruction of the hub. That's why the threads are longer on the freewheel side. YOU need all those threads.

    on the other side is a double threaded thing with regualar threaded area for the cog, then a slightly smaller, and most importantly, Left threaded section for the lock ring. (Remember that when you pedal back you are using the chain as a tool to unthread the cog, so the lock ring needs to be threaded opposite in order to prevent the cog from coming off.)

    I can send pics later, if you like
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  4. #4
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    Imagine, if you will, a track sprinter snapping out of the gate, legs the size of tree trunks, track pedals and 1/8" chain - those track cog threads take that time and time again. Think you can beat that with a freewheel? Well more power to you.

    Personally I think that the freewheel would be fine on the track side - make it your secondary freewheel.

    - Joel
    Cycling is Serious Business.

  5. #5
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    Great that's what I needed to know, I was hoping for the track cog threading. Now to find the WI Tracker front hub that has been in my box 'O' bike crap for about seven years and build up some wheels.
    Last edited by G-reg; 12-26-2005 at 03:56 AM.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  6. #6
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    one side should have threads that step down from the other set; this is the fixed side. the fixed side takes a freewheel nicely and about the only hassle is, if flipping the wheel on a ride, i.e., to shift, and you're running v-brakes or cantis, the pads need to be reset to accomodate the new wheel position. beyond that it's a great setup. enjoy.

  7. #7
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    ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Lutarious
    A freewheel takes a lot of load and wants full thread to stay put and to prevent destruction of the hub. That's why the threads are longer on the freewheel side. YOU need all those threads.
    Assuming that I understand you correctly, why would the fixie side of the hub be insufficient for a freewheel? Having a fixed cog on that side of the hub would seem to generate the same amount of torque as a like freewheel. Am I missing something here?

    I ran a freewheel on the fixed side all summer without incident. Has anyone had any problems doing this?

  8. #8
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    If you're thinking of running a track cog on the fixed side of the hub, you may need to run a thin freewheel spacer to push the cog out far enough for the lock-ring to meet against it. On my ENO hub (on my road bike), the threads on the fixed side were cut too far in and the lockring would bottom out against the hub body, not the cog (which was fun for the first few miles as I don't run brakes on my road fixie...the cog kept backing off a quarter crank-turn when I'd try to stop).

  9. #9
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well

    The "fixed side" has approx. the same number/width of threads as the FW side....give or take. But half of those on the fixie side comprise a stepped down/left hand thread.

    So.....a freewheel on a proper fixie hub would engage ~half the threaded section?

    Makes sense to me!



    Quote Originally Posted by Porter
    Assuming that I understand you correctly, why would the fixie side of the hub be insufficient for a freewheel? Having a fixed cog on that side of the hub would seem to generate the same amount of torque as a like freewheel. Am I missing something here?

    I ran a freewheel on the fixed side all summer without incident. Has anyone had any problems doing this?

  10. #10
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    I was just wondering if it was threaded for a lock ring on one side, I'd guarantee a fixed cog sees more torque than a freewheel side so I'm not worried about that. It's all built up, I screwed something up between WI's measurements and DT Spokecalc and ended up with spokes that were too short initially. My only criticism is that the threads were pretty rough for a 140.00 hub, but that's just a nit pick. I threw on a Dura-che cog and a Suntour lock ring I scrounged. To Hijack my own thread, does anybody think Surly's nice cogs and lockrings are worth it? I've got a Surly cog for freehub wheel and it's pretty nice, but I don't know if thethe Surly cog/lockring would be worth almost double the current set up.


    Last edited by G-reg; 12-31-2005 at 11:56 AM.
    Slowly slipping to retrogrouchyness

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-reg
    I was just wondering if it was threaded for a lock ring on one side, I'd guarantee a fixed cog sees more torque than a freewheel side so I'm not worried about that. It's all built up, I screwed something up between WI's measurements and DT Spokecalc and ended up with spokes that were too short initially. My only criticism is that the threads were pretty rough for a 140.00 hub, but that's just a nit pick. I threw on a Dura-che cog and a Suntour lock ring I scrounged. To Hijack my own thread, does anybody think a Surly's nice cogs and lockrings are worth it? I've got a Surly cog for freehub wheel and it's pretty nice, but I don't know if there cog/lockring would be worth almost double the current set up.


    Stick with the DA. I fail to see how the Surly could be worth the extra ching. I messengered on my DA cog for two years and it's still going strong on my road fixie. Just change the chain when they stretch and it should last you as long as you want it.

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