Endurance racing on a singlespeed.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Endurance racing on a singlespeed.

    Hey guys, I was unsure where to post this question but, my question is this. I don't need a bunch of wise crack answers (although they're still funny) but how should a guy ride a singlespeed long distance. I'm talking 80-200 miles. I've been out doing distances of 30-60 but I am totally worked. Am I just weak, or are there pointers. I'm no newb, I've finished more 100+ mile rides than I can count, and have finished the Dirty Kanza on my 8spd cross-check. It seems like long grades, and our always present 20-30 mph winds suck the life out of me. I know alot about nutrition, how and when to save energy, but it doesn't seem to help enuff. I love riding my singlespeed. and want to spend more time with it.
    (Surly 1x1 26" 32x16) btw. Any advice would be great. Thanks

  2. #2
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    It seems you know your stuff and you are trained enough. The rest is just mental.

  3. #3
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    Even though I haven't ridden anything near the rides you describe, I'd say make sure you have appropriate gearing (32:16 is heavy for really long rides with lots of hills) and go for a steady pace. Also, flat stretches are more tiring on a ss because you are spinning like mad and everything seems to take forever. Practice it, though. I also agree with Pooh Bear about the fact that a lot of the ride happens in your head. The right mindset can get you really far. Make haste slowly (festina lente).

  4. #4
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    Sounds like you have most of it figured out
    Something i learned over the winter was concentrating on strengthing the muscles you use for high cadence spinning. It sounds ridiculous but it helped.

    I have been taking spin classes and many of the teachers will have you spin at the highest cadence possible for two minute intervals. IT SUCKS!!!

    I have been on a few rides lately with friends on ss and we all have the same gearing. They thought i was lying about my gearing because i would just pull away from them in the pack on flats and they swear i was not pedaling any faster.

    I have also been on a few rides with guys that are pushing way tougher gearing than i was and i was forced to spin high cadence to keep up but it never got to the point that i was tired from it but i could tell they were starting to tire out from pushing the tougher gear.

    I use to be a masher but i think i might be a spinner now???
    Go figure.

    I could be totally wrong with all of this but it's just my two cents


    Quote Originally Posted by bspstp
    Hey guys, I was unsure where to post this question but, my question is this. I don't need a bunch of wise crack answers (although they're still funny) but how should a guy ride a singlespeed long distance. I'm talking 80-200 miles. I've been out doing distances of 30-60 but I am totally worked. Am I just weak, or are there pointers. I'm no newb, I've finished more 100+ mile rides than I can count, and have finished the Dirty Kanza on my 8spd cross-check. It seems like long grades, and our always present 20-30 mph winds suck the life out of me. I know alot about nutrition, how and when to save energy, but it doesn't seem to help enuff. I love riding my singlespeed. and want to spend more time with it.
    (Surly 1x1 26" 32x16) btw. Any advice would be great. Thanks

  5. #5
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    Ask the guys over at bikepacking.net they can definitely shine some lite on the subject. Also Chad has done numerous 300 mile rides on his SS last year http://chadfbrown.blogspot.com/ maybe he can help.

  6. #6
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    If you're worked at the end of a ride, you went to hard for your current fitness level. Slow down. You'll be fine. Knock .5 mph off your average and you'll feel a lot better at the end of the day. endurance is all about pacing yourself.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advice guys. Today, and for the next several days the wind will blow like a bastard out of the south at 30 gusts to 40, then tomorrow come from the north at the same rate. Is it worth getting the singlespeed out? Keep in mind this is Kansas gravel roads. They separate currently barren farm fields, so there is not alot of shelter from the wind. Any advice riding in this stuff.

  8. #8
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    If you want to ride your ss, it's worth riding your ss. wind is wind. tuck into it as much as you can. It affects multispeeds and singlespeeds equally. If it's that windy though, I would try to find some trails in trees.

  9. #9
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    A lot of the SS endurance / bikepacking guys run a 32/20 on a 29er for longer stuff. It allows you to work your cardio system more, which recovers faster than your muscular system. You also recover quicker this way.

    ps - If I remember correctly, Chad likes to run a 32/20 on his 29er because it fits unknown terrain well.
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bspstp
    Thanks for the advice guys. Today, and for the next several days the wind will blow like a bastard out of the south at 30 gusts to 40, then tomorrow come from the north at the same rate. Is it worth getting the singlespeed out? Keep in mind this is Kansas gravel roads. They separate currently barren farm fields, so there is not alot of shelter from the wind. Any advice riding in this stuff.
    Tight clothes help. Also don't put a backpack on, instead use bottles on the bike. Makes you more aerodynamic (whatever I am talking about - this is the SS-forum )
    2:1 gearing on a 26" is what I run all of the time. (Would not go for it in the Rocky Mountains, though.)

    When I go on really long rides, I never think of what I will ride next. No: "Around the next corner comes a long steep climb" or the likes.
    Try to focus: "Here and Now", but don't get into yourself ("it hurts here" or "itches there") or the bike ("was there a brake rubbing?") too much. Drink in the surroundings. It should be fun and recreation after all.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pooh Bear
    Tight clothes help. Also don't put a backpack on, instead use bottles on the bike. Makes you more aerodynamic (whatever I am talking about - this is the SS-forum )
    2:1 gearing on a 26" is what I run all of the time. (Would not go for it in the Rocky Mountains, though.)

    When I go on really long rides, I never think of what I will ride next. No: "Around the next corner comes a long steep climb" or the likes.
    Try to focus: "Here and Now", but don't get into yourself ("it hurts here" or "itches there") or the bike ("was there a brake rubbing?") too much. Drink in the surroundings. It should be fun and recreation after all.
    This is some of the best advice here. When I have been on long multiday rides in the back of beyond this is exactly the mindset I get into. What I find is really annoying though is when someone else keeps telling me how much further there is to go or how much longer the climb is - I dont want to know!

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