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Thread: Eccentric BB's?

  1. #1
    CB2
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    Eccentric BB's?

    How often do you have to adjust the chain tension?
    They sound like they create a lot of troubles for what they're worth; creaks, seizing, added weight and complexity.

  2. #2
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    Set screw EBB (Dean ti), used to have a pinch bolt style (Spicer steel).
    I have never had a creaking issue ever. I am going on three years without a peep.
    I may adjust my EBB every hundred miles. I am guessing on that based on the fact that when I do a hundred mile race in nasty conditions the chain could use a little tightening. When I did a hundred miles fixed I had to adjust it at the 80-85 mile mark. That would be an extreme case as I am sure I put that chain through a lot that day. I swap gears according to where I am riding so often that I don't really "tighten" the chain as often as I move it to adjust to the new gear.
    As far as the BB moving in relation to the saddle, I don't notice it so much. If I run a gear that is way different than the previous gear I may adjust the saddle height if necessary.
    I have never had a Bushnell. I think they are aestetically pleasing, but they sound like they have more problems than the others.
    Sliding drops seem nice, but four bolts and two tensioning screws seems like a bit more hardware.
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  3. #3
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    No problems here either. I have the Phil Wood with the set screws and no issues in the short time I have had the frame.

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    Seeing the bulky look of those sliding dropouts, finding the Bushnell clamping too complicated (read= prone to seize or other issue's) and don't like getting dirt into my BB shell with the pinch bolt idea, I opted for the set screw type with a Phil Wood EBB. Sorry, I cannot give you a ride or durability report right now, since my frame is still being constructed in Toscane/Italy. Picking it up Wednesday comming week. Can't wait.


    Anway; for what I've heared and read about the EBB/Slider options I choose what I thoughed was best and wanting a clean 'rear end' I got me the set screw EBB setup:




    P.s.; use the search function; there's been quite some writings over this topic which might interest you and help you decide what to get.
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  5. #5
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    Bushnell

    What's up with the pinchbolt style EBB's? Before Phil made one, a lot of people swore by Bushnell. And for some good reasons as well.
    Does the Phil logo improve the design so much?

    I can imagine creaking to be a larger issue with the bushnell. But mostly a good greasing of the EBB (pardon my French) should do the trick.

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  6. #6
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    The Phil logo doesn't add the design, its basically still a single piece of machined alu. The only 'thing' is that there aren't that much others out there that make just an alu eccentric. Niner Bikes seems to have a light version made out of Scandium though.
    No, I am not retro.... I am way ahead of my time...

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    The logo is inside the BB anyway.....

    I've had a Phil wood pinch bolt running for 3 years with no problems....... started experiencing a creak, but when I looked closer found it was a missing chainring bolt!

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    The niner EBB could perhaps be an Easton?
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    Bushnell EBB

    I am using a Bushnell EBB for years without having any problem like seizing or creaking.
    You just have to make sure to use a copper spray or good quality grease with graphite
    particles and apply it generously to the cams of the EBB.
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    BUSHNELL.......never again

    I have a new gen Bushnell.
    Major effort to remedy the following problems.........
    slips, dirt magnet, not a simple adjustment, PITA.
    The creaking is the BB however.

    C.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steelhead
    What's up with the pinchbolt style EBB's? Before Phil made one, a lot of people swore by Bushnell. And for some good reasons as well.
    Does the Phil logo improve the design so much?

    I can imagine creaking to be a larger issue with the bushnell. But mostly a good greasing of the EBB (pardon my French) should do the trick.

    Steelhead
    The pinch bolt ans set screw EBBs have been around far longer than the internal expanding type and have been well proven on thousands of tandems. The Phil insert is "just" a high quaility and lighter version that also has more throw than many of the older inserts.
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    I think it depends on the type of expanding EBBs you have.

    The original Bushnell is used by lots of companies incl. Seven, Salsa, On-One, Ventana

    and numerous tandem framebuilders... it is proven so far.

    Walt from www.waltworks.com uses them for years too.

    The EBB Cannondale built into their singlespeed fames is complete rubbish, because it

    creaks and tends to turn loose.

    Me personally would favour slider dropouts by now, as you can see in my Gleiss custom

    frame!

  13. #13
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    You could just use horizontal drops with V-brakes. Simple. Light. Proven performer for many years. And no creaking.

  14. #14
    CB2
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    Thanks for all the input.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CB2
    How often do you have to adjust the chain tension?
    The same as you would with any other chain tensioning system. Your chain will not stretch faster because you have an EBB!


    Quote Originally Posted by CB2
    They sound like they create a lot of troubles for what they're worth; creaks, seizing, added weight and complexity.
    Any system to tension your chain has pros and cons. It is up to the user to decide what issues are the most important for their intended use. For me the answer is definately a pinch bolt EBB, and here is why:

    1: Easy rear wheel removal and re-attachment. I do not have to fiddle with chain tension as I would with horizontal dropouts, and I use a quick release so no tools required.

    2: Rear disc brake friendly.

    3: Easy adjustment of chain tension. Simply loosen the 2 pinch bolts and rotate the insert slightly to get perfect tension. No worrying about getting the wheel straight as with sliding dropouts and horizontal dropouts.

    4: EBB can be setup in either the top or bottom half to adjust rock and pedal clearance.

    5: Cleanest looks!

    Also here are my reasons for liking the Pinch bolt style over the other 2: the expanding wedge type can sieze and creak and be a pain to adjust. The set screw type can gouge the EBB insert and make small adjustments difficult, and they can deform the bottom bracket shell which will also cause creaking and other nasty issues.

    I'm not saying the pinch bolt EBB is perfect, but for me it is the best option.

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poolagent
    I think it depends on the type of expanding EBBs you have.

    The original Bushnell is used by lots of companies incl. Seven, Salsa, On-One, Ventana

    and numerous tandem framebuilders... it is proven so far.

    Walt from www.waltworks.com uses them for years too...
    There have beenn at least a half dozen reports of seized Bushnells - old and new - on this board.

    Maybe one report of a seized solid insert and that was removed fairly easily with a mallet.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelhead
    The niner EBB could perhaps be an Easton?
    It is designed by and made for Niner. Like everything Niner sells it is not an off-the-shelf item.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    There have beenn at least a half dozen reports of seized Bushnells - old and new - on this board.
    Really? I haven't read any, but maybe I'm haven't been around long enough (or read the right threads...). The most I've heard is not being able to move it because the screw was not backed out far enough - which falls into the "user mistake" category.

    Ofcourse anything can be seized if you add enough salt, water, or corrosive agent your choice....

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsdoable
    Really? I haven't read any, but maybe I'm haven't been around long enough (or read the right threads...). The most I've heard is not being able to move it because the screw was not backed out far enough - which falls into the "user mistake" category.

    Ofcourse anything can be seized if you add enough salt, water, or corrosive agent your choice....

    I have ran a Bushnell for years, without a single creak or seize. Get a cup of Rock and Roll Spider grease and completely take the Bushnell apart. Grease every single part, inside and out. Put the EBB back together and grease the bb shell and install the ebb. It takes about 5 minutes and is done only once a year. You may have to do it a couple times a year depending on where you live. If yours creaks or seizes, I would have to say that it is your own fault, all bikes need some routine checking.
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