EBB to singulator or???- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    EBB to singulator or???

    I'm currently riding a 1fg which has been trouble free for the year and a half I've been riding it except that it punishes my often injured wrists and shoulders on rough trails. The abuse has me choosing my rides based on how bad I'm going to feel after the ride rather than which trail I really want to ride so I've been considering a Ti or steel SS frame. I don't ride a common size frame so I'll either have to buy custom or convert a more common conventional frame (found a great deal on a Pisgah) with a singulator or similar tentioner and I don't know anyone who rides with this set up so I'm hoping to get some opinions on how tentioners work in comparison to an EBB or sliding dropout setup. Thanks for any tips.

  2. #2
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    A better fork and/or a larger tire with lower pressure will soften the ride more than a frame swap.
    Todd............. If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague

  3. #3
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    True

    I've tried up to 2.5 Diesels which helped but added a pound in the worst place. The better fork is not an easy slamdunk on a Cannondale with the longer headtube used for the headshock but it's allways an option. Thanks for the suggestion.

  4. #4
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    White Industries eccentric rear hub on that Pishah would give you a super sweet riding singlespeed! Love the versitilty of that set up, with a wheel change you can make any hardtail (and some FS) bike a true singlespeed. They look cool, are super high quality and last forever.

    http://www.mysinglespeed.com/portal.php?sid=1

  5. #5
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    Since your reporting your wrists hurt, have you looked at your stem/bar cockpit setup ?

  6. #6
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    I don't see how a Ti or steel frame is going to help your wrist problem at all. Not trying to be negative or discouraging, I'd just rather see you solve the problem than sink more money into options that don't improve your riding experience.

  7. #7
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    My wrists get sore after a bumpy ride on the SS. Any suggestions on "cockpit" set up would be awesome?
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    I'm currently riding a 1fg which has been trouble free for the year and a half I've been riding it except that it punishes my often injured wrists and shoulders on rough trails. The abuse has me choosing my rides based on how bad I'm going to feel after the ride rather than which trail I really want to ride so I've been considering a Ti or steel SS frame. I don't ride a common size frame so I'll either have to buy custom or convert a more common conventional frame (found a great deal on a Pisgah) with a singulator or similar tentioner and I don't know anyone who rides with this set up so I'm hoping to get some opinions on how tentioners work in comparison to an EBB or sliding dropout setup. Thanks for any tips.
    i agree with peanutbutterbreath in that another frame is probably not the answer. because of the aluminum frame the 1fg is a rough riding bike IMHO. i'm assuming youre riding it rigid? if so the absence of suspension is most likely the culprit. some who have previous wrist injuries are ill advised to ride rigid since it exacerbates the problem. i would look into getting a good suspension fork rather than simply throwing a bunch of weight at the front of your bike via a larger tire. of course a larger tire with lower pressure will help some and be a good interim fix to get a little relief, but youll find way more with a front shock. and yes... even with a front shock its a "REAL" singlespeed.

    cockpit setup is also at play here. are you too far over the bars? you could try some riser bars and/or shorter stem with more rise to get you up to a more "moto" stance. this puts more weight on your arse and less weight on your wrists. also transmits much less shock to your wrists than riding in a more "racing" stance with your upper body down over long stem flatter bars.

    Quote Originally Posted by SLOWRIDER
    The better fork is not an easy slamdunk on a Cannondale with the longer headtube used for the headshock but it's allways an option.
    you may have an issue finding a used fork thats long enough, but a new fork has PLENTY of steer tube to fit.
    Last edited by monogod; 03-20-2007 at 08:26 AM.
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  9. #9
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    You have to be able to keep your joints loose and absorb hits without being jarred around. If your cockpit is too long and/or your bars are so low that your weight is pitched forward onto your wrists, you are more likely to experience pain.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbyker
    White Industries eccentric rear hub on that Pishah would give you a super sweet riding singlespeed! Love the versitilty of that set up, with a wheel change you can make any hardtail (and some FS) bike a true singlespeed. They look cool, are super high quality and last forever.]
    cant use an eno rear hub on a fs bike unless its got a urt. fs bikes have dynamic chainstay lengths and thus require some sort of dynamic tensioner.

    ANY bike with one gear is a "TRUE" singlespeed... tensioner or no.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rider1x1
    My wrists get sore after a bumpy ride on the SS. Any suggestions on "cockpit" set up would be awesome?
    are you too far over the bars? you could try some riser bars and/or shorter stem with more rise to get you up to a more "moto" stance. this puts more weight on your arse and less weight on your wrists. also transmits much less shock to your wrists than riding in a more "racing" stance with your upper body down over long stem flatter bars.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  12. #12
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    Thanks PBB & Monogod for the tips. Based on your suggestions I probably need a shorter stem I think I am putting to much weight on my handle bars.

    Slowrider, sorry, didn't mean to change your post or interrupt.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    The better fork is not an easy slamdunk on a Cannondale with the longer headtube used for the headshock but it's allways an option.
    Consider a Lefty... they function worlds better than the Headshok forks.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by aosty
    Consider a Lefty... they function worlds better than the Headshok forks.
    I wouldn't go that far, not at all.

    more travel yes. headshocks are stiff as hell in the corners where it counts... not that leftys aren't. Just sayin' the newer model headshocks are lovely, especially in race conditions. that said - sometimes I do wish I had the extra 30 mm.

    I'd also consider a set of carbon bars for a little extra kush in the wrist zone. check your grips too, I like oury's as they have releived some of my hand pain in the past.
    My one says BRAP!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    I'm currently riding a 1fg which has been trouble free for the year and a half I've been riding it except that it punishes my often injured wrists and shoulders on rough trails. The abuse has me choosing my rides based on how bad I'm going to feel after the ride rather than which trail I really want to ride so I've been considering a Ti or steel SS frame. I don't ride a common size frame so I'll either have to buy custom or convert a more common conventional frame (found a great deal on a Pisgah) with a singulator or similar tentioner and I don't know anyone who rides with this set up so I'm hoping to get some opinions on how tentioners work in comparison to an EBB or sliding dropout setup. Thanks for any tips.
    My experience with the Gusset tencioner has been less than perfect. It gets the job done, but I do have the occasional case when the chain will drop when I go off of a drop or bownce thru a rock garden. Neither of these is a deal killer, but it can be an anoyance. The good part is that it is easy to get the chain back onto the chainring because of the slack that the tensioner is taking up.

    Of course, this may have more to do with my build than with the gusset tensioner. I went on the cheap and just used the middle chain ring from a triple set up. I could quite possibly be having these problems as a result of the ramps on my chain ring more than with any inherent flaw with the chain tensioner. Just don't tell my wife that I said that. I am using these issues to justify the purchase of a dedicated SS bike
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  16. #16
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    [QUOTE=monogod]cant use an eno rear hub on a fs bike unless its got a urt. fs bikes have dynamic chainstay lengths and thus require some sort of dynamic tensioner.

    My bad, but I thought some FS designs keep a consistant chain line, like the I-Drive system for example.

  17. #17
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    [QUOTE=mtbyker]
    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    My bad, but I thought some FS designs keep a consistant chain line, like the I-Drive system for example.
    no man, youre correct. there are some that do. those with a urt, which the i-drive basically is, can run an eno hub or simply a half link. with the urt the rear triange piviots at the bb and the angles and chainstay length remain static rather than dymanic as on most fs bikes.

    thats how kona does it with the a, which is a sweet fs ss with horizontal drops.

    wasnt flaming you, just clarifying...
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  18. #18
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    Wow

    Well I should have described my injuries and bike a bit better so here goes. I have a 70mm headshock on it which I'm sure could be improved by replacing it with just about any fork. Second the TT is actually .7" shorter than my FS bike and .25" shorter than what I find best for me so I don't think it's the cockpit length. I'm running a Monkeylite high rise bar and a fairly highrise Headshock stem and I put the thickest grips I could find on it which has my bars around an inch higher than my saddle so I think I'm good there.
    I think the major problem is that I've broken both wrists, many of the bones in both hands and had 2 surgeries on my shoulders in a combination of industrial accidents, traffic accidents and 2 wheel misshaps both motorized and not so most of my discomfort can't be blamed on my SS but I can try to soften the hit as much as possible. I've even considered trying to build a full suspension SS because my 5 Spot dosn't hurt like the SS but I barely have enough steam to ride the hardtail SS.
    My thought on the Ti bike is between that, a good fork, carbon bars, thick grips and the biggest tires I can fit it the frame I should be able to ride more comfortably.Thanks again.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    Well I should have described my injuries and bike a bit better so here goes. I have a 70mm headshock on it which I'm sure could be improved by replacing it with just about any fork. Second the TT is actually .7" shorter than my FS bike and .25" shorter than what I find best for me so I don't think it's the cockpit length. I'm running a Monkeylite high rise bar and a fairly highrise Headshock stem and I put the thickest grips I could find on it which has my bars around an inch higher than my saddle so I think I'm good there.
    I think the major problem is that I've broken both wrists, many of the bones in both hands and had 2 surgeries on my shoulders in a combination of industrial accidents, traffic accidents and 2 wheel misshaps both motorized and not so most of my discomfort can't be blamed on my SS but I can try to soften the hit as much as possible. I've even considered trying to build a full suspension SS because my 5 Spot dosn't hurt like the SS but I barely have enough steam to ride the hardtail SS.
    My thought on the Ti bike is between that, a good fork, carbon bars, thick grips and the biggest tires I can fit it the frame I should be able to ride more comfortably.Thanks again.
    oh... well in light of the new information a response is quite easy....

    YOURE F****ED!

    j/k...

    you may want to go with a better fork on the fg, the headshok is a pretty decent fork but not what anyone will ever call "plush".

    as far as softening the hits.... no matter what material ht frame you ride a great deal of shock will be transmitted to you. perhaps an option would be to go for a pivotless suspension frame. not much heavier than a ht, but eats up a lot of the abrupt impacts and jolts and you still have pretty much the same trail feel as a ht.

    just something to look into.

    sounds like you have your cockpit set up well, so i dont think thats the issue.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  20. #20
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    As far as frame material goes, I have a Ti hardtail and a steel hardtail and they are still hardtails. I think your money is better spent on the plushest fork you can find and perhaps a hardtail that can handle longer travel. While Al, the Santa Cruz Chameleon can handle longer travel forks (like 140mm), which I think will help more than carbon bars, big tires or a Ti or steel frame.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    As far as frame material goes, I have a Ti hardtail and a steel hardtail and they are still hardtails. I think your money is better spent on the plushest fork you can find and perhaps a hardtail that can handle longer travel. While Al, the Santa Cruz Chameleon can handle longer travel forks (like 140mm), which I think will help more than carbon bars, big tires or a Ti or steel frame.
    I have a 1FG. It ROCKS on the climbs; it rocks me on the descents. I think that the cannondale alum bikes are the stiffest on the market. The 1FG has a fairly relaxed head tube angle with the headshock. If you were to put even a 100mm fork on that bike it would steer like a chopper and your handling would go out the window. The only way to go is steel. I have a Voodoo Wanga with a F100 RLC that is so much more nimble on the descents than my 1FG (now my coffee shop bike). The bike is designed to have a 71 degree head tube angle with a 100mm fork. Also, vertical dropouts on horizontal sliders are the best SS system out there.

    P.S. Carbon bars help immensely against hand fatigue.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    As far as frame material goes, I have a Ti hardtail and a steel hardtail and they are still hardtails. I think your money is better spent on the plushest fork you can find and perhaps a hardtail that can handle longer travel. While Al, the Santa Cruz Chameleon can handle longer travel forks (like 140mm), which I think will help more than carbon bars, big tires or a Ti or steel frame.
    agreed... if you plan to stick with the hardtail
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jenglish23
    I have a 1FG. It ROCKS on the climbs; it rocks me on the descents. I think that the cannondale alum bikes are the stiffest on the market. The 1FG has a fairly relaxed head tube angle with the headshock. If you were to put even a 100mm fork on that bike it would steer like a chopper and your handling would go out the window.
    I can agree with you about the climbing and descending... it's a goat going up, and very very unforgiving on the descents, very similar to riding fully ridgid imo.

    I'm not so sure about the fork option though. I beleive the 1FG has the same geometry as their other hardtails which sport the lefty. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I've been thinking about going the lefty route to shave some time off the downhills... I wouldn't put the 130mm version on there that's for sure but I think you'd be safe with the racier models, 110mm.

    I'd have to get the carbon version, so basically it'll never happen... lol.
    My one says BRAP!

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