Earth day, hobo stove, fixed shelter- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Earth day, hobo stove, fixed shelter

    It was stormy and cold when we arrived at the lake to ride yesterday. I tried out my new stove design while we waited for the storm to pass.

    Two coffee cans stacked to make an incredible vortex of fire. I used homemade fire starter made from dryer lint with melted parifin wax to start the fire.

    We roasted a can of soup, I predried the wet Madrone over the stove before dropping them into the inferno. I like burning Madrone, it's a neat tree too.

    We turned our fixies upside down and used them to make a wind break. Those ridgerest pads and a tree made comfy chairs.

    One little pile of wet wood burned hot for two hours, it sure was nice. I love practicing staying warm in this wet world. The stove doesn't scare the ground or make much ash.

    The lake shore was interesting to ride along, lots of nice rocks and old stumps. We looped back on the single track. I sure like this Oregon play ground.
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  2. #2
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    Hot soup

    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    It was stormy and cold when we arrived at the lake to ride yesterday. I tried out my new stove design while we waited for the storm to pass.

    Two coffee cans stacked to make an incredible vortex of fire. I used homemade fire starter made from dryer lint with melted parifin wax to start the fire.

    We roasted a can of soup, I predried the wet Madrone over the stove before dropping them into the inferno. I like burning Madrone, it's a neat tree too.

    We turned our fixies upside down and used them to make a wind break. Those ridgerest pads and a tree made comfy chairs.

    One little pile of wet wood burned hot for two hours, it sure was nice. I love practicing staying warm in this wet world. The stove doesn't scare the ground or make much ash.

    The lake shore was interesting to ride along, lots of nice rocks and old stumps. We looped back on the single track. I sure like this Oregon play ground.
    Fixed

    The mountains look like they are smoking.

    Just a can of soup on a cold wet day.
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  3. #3
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    So completely rad.

  4. #4
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    So cool, you dudes are hard core!
    "A full rigid SS or fixie is 99% rider, 1% bike, and 100% more fun" Monogod

  5. #5
    Steel and teeth.
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    Very f****n cool! That looks like a sweet little trip. Dam*, Oregon sure is pretty.

    --bb

  6. #6
    vegan cyclocross disco
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    Is the silver bike trying to mount the blue one?
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  7. #7
    one chain loop
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    Quote Originally Posted by iamandy
    Is the silver bike trying to mount the blue one?
    brokebike mountain?
    everything sucks but my vacuum cleaner.

  8. #8
    Tree Hugger
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    Quote Originally Posted by lef-t
    It was stormy and cold when we arrived at the lake to ride yesterday. I tried out my new stove design while we waited for the storm to pass.

    The lake shore was interesting to ride along, lots of nice rocks and old stumps. We looped back on the single track. I sure like this Oregon play ground.
    Sounds like a typical Oregon picnic in April!

    I love riding along the shoreline between the boat ramp and the campground. Those old stumps are awesome, especially when the roots are exposed and sitting up on top of the soil.
    I love mankind - it's people I can't stand. ~Charles M. Schulz

  9. #9
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    You can keep the cold wet ride.. I don't care what you are riding, being cold and wet is no fun.

  10. #10
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    My rain gear was wet, I was warm and dry

    Quote Originally Posted by bgredjeep
    You can keep the cold wet ride.. I don't care what you are riding, being cold and wet is no fun.
    You only get cold if you wear the wrong thing, like cotton. Most of the time we are trying to stay cool with all our rain gear on. When you stop for a long time you can get cold.

    I'm used to really cold winter riding, I came from the high country of northern Arizona five years ago. I learned there how to stay warm and dry in really cold wet conditions.

    One nice thing, there's no people or insects to bother us. I guess everyone is at home staying warm and dry.

    I always say, it's not Alaska, I wonder what they say in Alaska? Maybe they say well at least it's not Antarctica. Oregon is not so bad, everyone just thinks it rains all the time. That's what I used to think. We have at least three days of sunshine every year.

    Summer's coming............I'll be ready, I didn't sit around all winter waiting for the sun.

  11. #11
    No Justice = No Peace
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    Hobo Stove...

    Is your stove as simple as it looks? Just two cans opened up along the sides and stacked? Looks like maybe something under it too.

    I seem to recall you, or someone else posting a stove that had a big hole in teh side of a can and some kind of a fire ring at the top. Any knowledge of this?

    Looks like a great ride. I like it cold and wet too. It makes the warm and dry feel so much better.
    "Welcome to my underground lair...."

  12. #12
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    As they say, no such thing as bad weather, just the wrong clothes.
    As little bike as possible, as silent as possible.
    Latitude: 5736' Highlands, Scotland

  13. #13
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    simple as it looks

    Quote Originally Posted by Lutarious
    Is your stove as simple as it looks? Just two cans opened up along the sides and stacked? Looks like maybe something under it too.

    I seem to recall you, or someone else posting a stove that had a big hole in teh side of a can and some kind of a fire ring at the top. Any knowledge of this?

    Looks like a great ride. I like it cold and wet too. It makes the warm and dry feel so much better.
    Coffee can stoves work because the reflect the heat back into the the fire making the fire more efficient than a campfire.
    The stove is the next version of my old design, it is just two cans sitting ontop of each other. The big opening is important to let the heat reflect back to you. It's sitting on a couple of aluminum pie pans also recycled. The double decker stover creates more draw than the single can stove did. I hate to go out in the woods without it. It will easily burn wet wood, the only kind we have in these parts.

    It produces very little smoke, and leaves no trace of a campfire. I carry my stove inside my ridgerest pad wrapped around my top tube. It takes up no space and weighs little. Fuel is free and plentiful. You can boil lots of water and heat large amounts of snow, the hot water can be poured into old juice bottles and used as a second heat source for sleeping in the cold without a bag.

    With a little homemade fire starter like wax and dryer lint, a hot fire is always easy to start and maintain in the worst weather Oregon has to offer. I especially like firing it up on wet days, it's good for the soul and keeps you safe from hypothermia. You can warm any food just by putting it near the hot stove. I like to make jiffy pop popcorn on the stove.

    One or two arm loads of wood will burn all night and leave little ash, it burns the wood completly, gathering large amounts of wood to maintain a campfire for the night in nearly impossible in some places. In real survival situations a fire can make it easy on you and yours. Try a coffee can stove next time you go camping. You will be amazed like me.

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