Dollars and sense driving me to SS?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 51 of 51
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34

    New question here. Dollars and sense driving me to SS?

    I have been shopping for a 29er FS bike and am getting frustrated with the ridiculously high prices and lack of demo opportunities before I spend so much dinero. I have now had three guys from different LBS's do a great job answering all my questions about the various FS29ers and yet I'm still reluctant to drop a month+ salary on a bike. The last question I asked each guy was, "What do you ride?" You guessed it, all SS. Two rode 29ers and the short guy was on 26". None of these guys were fanatics or pushed SS until I asked. Probably because none of the shops carried any in stock. But once the cat was out of the hat all three of them lit up like a kid who just discovered his favorite flavor of ice cream.

    Each of them had the same baffled sheepish look when they said, "I know it sounds strange but...." The sentences ended in things like, "you will be faster, it is easier, funner" RIIIGHT.

    After my encounter with the third guy today I decided to spend the evening researching this phenomenon. Sure enough the same kind of counterintuitive gushing is all over the place here. Everybody says that SS is more fun and even faster than gears. I just find that hard to believe. It is hard enough getting up some of these climbs spinning in 24/34 gearing. How long after starting SS does it take for the magic strong leg juice to start flowing in your veins?

    Aesthetically SS is very appealing to me but the claims I've read on the "Why SS thread" seem far fetched, except that it will make you stronger. I swear there must be some sort of group hypnosis going on because it seems like everybody who rides SS (or 29ers for that matter) is converted to some sort of zealot. Doesn't anybody hate them?

    Is there some kind of happy drug you guys get from not using your thumbs?

    Let me ask the question that I'm sure has been asked and answered in several other forms. Is ST for me?

    I live and ride in N. AZ (Prescott, Flagstaff) and enjoy riding single track with short technical sections but mostly just fun flowing up and down stuff.

    I'm 49 years old 6'3.5" 185lbs and in generally good shape. I don't ride mtbs much lately but have been riding them since 1982. The best mtb I have ever owned is a 1986 Fat Chance that I still have and am thinking about converting to SS. I have been mostly riding KTM dirt bikes for the last 5-6 years but want to switch it up and do some pedal ST. I ride road bikes more often and am all about cadence (90-110) and I love climbing. My skinny legs don't have a lot of power though. I'm the guy on the mtb you hear dropping gears at the base of steep climbs and going granny gear before I hit the incline.

    I am a simple guy who likes function over form, low maintenance, instinctive movement. I hunt with a longbow.

    I have bought into the 29er thing after a couple of rides on a Titus Rockstar but dollars and "sense" is making me reconsider the FS thing and trying a SS 29er.

    Comments?

  2. #2
    nothing to see here
    Reputation: Stevob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,271
    Try it. If you don't like it, you stand to loose less than if you decide you don't like a full susp geared 29er.

    I reckon you'll like it. But you will never know until you try. Regardless of how much researching or opinion seeking you do.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    563
    Try make friends with the 3 SS guys you meet in your LBS. Chances are they have more than 1 bike in SS mode. Judging from how you get along with them, maybe they can hook you up with one of theirs during a group ride or some sort?

  4. #4
    120
    120 is offline
    Kicker of Elves
    Reputation: 120's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    427
    Sounds like you're a SS type. I ride MX too and I'm sick of shocks and forks, valves, bearings, linkages etc. I got rid of my 4 stroke and want another 2 stroke for simplicity and cost.

    I've been through all the "hi-tech" stuff and am over it (for now). I'm 43 and with work and family my priorities have changed.

    My main SS is fully rigid - 29". I just want to ride it, not fiddle with it. I have too much other stuff to buy, fix, save for (like college for the offspring) etc.

    As far as being able to ride it, I wouldn't worry about it. Riding a MTB is going to be tough at times. Going up hill is just difficult no matter what you ride. My geared bike hurt to ride up hills too. I know this is a generalization but that's pretty much how I look at it.

    I don't know if SS has made me stronger or not, but that's probably because I quit caring about that long ago.

    And if you have to get off and walk, who cares? What are people going to say? "Look at the pansy who can't get up the hill with one gear"?

  5. #5
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,366
    Ok, ignore what anyone else writes, as I'm the only one who is going to make sense here.

    You have ****ing Fat Chance. A Fat ****ing Chance. SS the beast and you will discover within 20 miles if you hate it or love it. My guess is that you will discover a lot and find some things to add, some to subtract. A conversion won't cost an assload. 30 bucks if you order from Performance. If you ship the Fat Chance to my address, I'll send you a tensioner for free.

    It isn't a magic ****ing bullet for mountain biking. It works for some people because it resonates with them. I'd tell you my story, but it is boring ****ing **** and I'd pass on tales from other SS riders, but it is the same tired ass narrative. You like SS or you don't. I'm a bit of an internet guru, so my guess is that you are one or the other.

    Last point, you might want to start dry humping the world wide web's favorite mountain biking fad, the 29er. I'd piss on it more, but people ****ing like the shitass machines and you might be a ******bag that thinks it has reinvented the wheel. It just made the wheel heavier. Anyway, if that particular branch of the SS bug hits you, rumor is that everyone and their mom wants your Fat Chance. Throw it up on ebay and buy a swank 29er with the scratch.

    Or give it to me for the tensioner. I'm pretty sure the spring isn't entirely spent.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    Quote Originally Posted by 120
    Sounds like you're a SS type. I ride MX too and I'm sick of shocks and forks, valves, bearings, linkages etc. I got rid of my 4 stroke and want another 2 stroke for simplicity and cost.

    "Look at the pansy who can't get up the hill with one gear"?
    Amen on the first part. Shopping for a KTM 200 right now to get rid of the 450. Simple and light.

    Good point on the second part but you for got to add "old"

    I guess partly I'm just amazed and a bit skeptical about some of the things these guys say about SS. Makes me wonder why anybody would want gears...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    681
    Convert that Fat Chance, I say. It doesn't cost an arm and a leg to do a basic conversion. Trust us, you'll find out soon enough whether you like ss or not

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    HA! love it. Glad to hear a hater.

    I have heard that the Fat Chance is a big deal for some vintage types but if it so great why doesn't anybody make clones of it? I loved the bike in the 1980's but I'm pretty sure there have been a few improvements since then. I just need to find the modern bike for me. I have thought about selling the old iron but I still ride it sometimes. Nobody will give a straight answer on what they think it is worth since they probably want to steal it from me.

    I don't care for my current 2004 FSR comp Piece Of S*** that I bought used for cheap thinking I should at least get a bike made in this century. My late 90's Jamis Dakar was also a POS. I was ready to give up totally on FS bikes until I rode my friend's Titus Rockstar FS 29er and loved it. Too bad they don't make them anymore and I couldn't afford it if they did. I just haven't been impressed enough with the "affordable" 29er FS bikes to pull the trigger.

    I have been waiting for the 29er fad to pass but it looks like they are here to stay and are in fact taking over the world. My 26" riding friends have threatened to make me wear flannel and hipster pants if I buy a 29er SS.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    I suspect I will struggle with ss at first. Learning curve and all that aside it seems like some serious muscle reconditioning is required. How long does it take to make the transition?

    I'm wondering about all the guys who say they loved it right off and how they were soon faster and better. I see how it would make you stronger and slower but not so sure about faster?

  10. #10
    nothing to see here
    Reputation: Stevob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,271
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    How long does it take to make the transition?
    Between three and five minutes.

    edit...but jokes aside now, it took me a good two years to get strong enough to hold my own, and another two years to be seriously faster. It's all dependent on how you treat your body, determination times eleventy billion, and how much you ride.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    I suspect I will struggle with ss at first. Learning curve and all that aside it seems like some serious muscle reconditioning is required. How long does it take to make the transition?

    I'm wondering about all the guys who say they loved it right off and how they were soon faster and better. I see how it would make you stronger and slower but not so sure about faster?
    You wont struggle too much because you select a gear ratio for your current strength / fitness. I say too much because you also want it to challenge you so you can improve.

    As for being quicker on a SS than a geared i dont buy it either i ride both and over a set route the geared is quicker but on certain sections the SS is faster.

    +1 for converting your fat chance as it wont cost a lot and you can then make your own decision

  12. #12
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    I'm wondering about all the guys who say they loved it right off and how they were soon faster and better. I see how it would make you stronger and slower but not so sure about faster?
    You go faster because you can't sit and spin up a hill, and you don't really loose much time going down.
    You instinctively learn to pick better lines to conserve momentum which I guess makes you better.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,742
    Do a cheap conversion on your Fat Chance and continue to save for a FS 29. I've been racing SS exclusive (MTB and CX) for a few years now and love it, but I just picked up a new HiFi and have been tinkering with a SS conversion, but in the meantime riding it as a 1x9. I have to say, it is nice to ride gears once in a while, especially on older knees, and the rear suspension is nice to, but I look forward to getting on my SS 29er every day.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,313
    Quote Originally Posted by CB2
    You go faster because you can't sit and spin up a hill, and you don't really loose much time going down.
    You instinctively learn to pick better lines to conserve momentum which I guess makes you better.
    Plus you get to recover more on the flats by spinning rather than burning out your legs in a too big gear.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: badgermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    571

    To the OP...

    I have been back and forth with bikes more than I like to admit. No matter how fancy or super duper all the bikes I've had have been, I ALWAYS come back to the SS.

    Part of this is how my riding style has developed. Gears are now painful for me to ride. Weird, I know. Painful...in my joints, core, etc. AND...I make more obstacles, more climbs, with less fatigue when I am riding a SS. SS means first in group, gears means last...literally. Not that last is bad, but I am DESTROYED after a seated climb, as oppsed to being ready for more with the SS.

    If you do decide to go the SS route, it will take a little time to adjust. I've found that a SS 29er, steel frame, with a suspension fork is pretty great overall. I used to ride rigid, and still prefer it, but the fork allows me to descend faster and to charge obstacles.

    I think a safe estimate is...I make 85-90% of everything on the SS. I make 100% on the gears...but am slower, more tired, and then have to clean the bike afterwards.

    Assess your priorities and preferences in relation to your riding. You sound like a good candidate for the SS. MAKE SURE that it is a 29er.


    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    HA! love it. Glad to hear a hater.

    I have heard that the Fat Chance is a big deal for some vintage types but if it so great why doesn't anybody make clones of it? I loved the bike in the 1980's but I'm pretty sure there have been a few improvements since then. I just need to find the modern bike for me. I have thought about selling the old iron but I still ride it sometimes. Nobody will give a straight answer on what they think it is worth since they probably want to steal it from me.

    I don't care for my current 2004 FSR comp Piece Of S*** that I bought used for cheap thinking I should at least get a bike made in this century. My late 90's Jamis Dakar was also a POS. I was ready to give up totally on FS bikes until I rode my friend's Titus Rockstar FS 29er and loved it. Too bad they don't make them anymore and I couldn't afford it if they did. I just haven't been impressed enough with the "affordable" 29er FS bikes to pull the trigger.

    I have been waiting for the 29er fad to pass but it looks like they are here to stay and are in fact taking over the world. My 26" riding friends have threatened to make me wear flannel and hipster pants if I buy a 29er SS.

  16. #16
    openwound
    Reputation: voodoochild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    580
    Find a used 29 inch ss and try it out. Yeah, you'll have a little learning curve but it's not all that.

    Your trails will all be sorta new for a while as you learn how to conserve momentum and figure out what gearing works for you.

    In no time at all we'll all be reading about your ss dream bike build... do it.
    -- let's ride

  17. #17
    beware the grammar police
    Reputation: paco664's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    753
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    I suspect I will struggle with ss at first. Learning curve and all that aside it seems like some serious muscle reconditioning is required. How long does it take to make the transition?

    I'm wondering about all the guys who say they loved it right off and how they were soon faster and better. I see how it would make you stronger and slower but not so sure about faster?
    not as long as you think........ within a month or so you will notice a great difference....

    but just ride.... its like being a kid again on a SS.....
    owner and founder of www.moto-rush.com motorcycling community

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    Thanks for the tips. I'm searching for a used 29 SS. Trying to decide if I should go cheap rigid or spend more and get one with a suspension fork. Advice? Brands?

  19. #19
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,669
    Quote Originally Posted by badgermtb
    You sound like a good candidate for the SS. MAKE SURE that it is a 29er.
    Agreed!

    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    My 26" riding friends have threatened to make me wear flannel and hipster pants if I buy a 29er SS.
    How do you feel about tattoos? Just saying
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  20. #20
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,516
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    HA! love it. Glad to hear a hater.

    I have been waiting for the 29er fad to pass but it looks like they are here to stay and are in fact taking over the world. My 26" riding friends have threatened to make me wear flannel and hipster pants if I buy a 29er SS.
    Your 26" riding friends sound like ****** bags.
    Yeah, believe it or not (ahem, umarth...) there have been a few tweaks to off road bike geometry in the last 25 years.
    If you can try out a 29" one-speed, I think you'll like it, especially at your size.

    Los
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  21. #21
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Haven't tried SS and don't own a 29er? Knock the **** out of both birds with one stone and get a 29er SS. Redline Monocog 29er is $500 new. Mine is awesome. Currently set up with a fat front. It rivals the fun factor of my Salsa El Mariachi (also SS). At your height, I'd imagine you'd feel right at home on a 29er.

    If it doesn't end up working out for you, send me your Fat. I know that didn't make sense, but don't think about it too much.

    PS -- There is a local guy here in Utah that is selling an XL Karate Monkey for $550 (Ad says "new"). I can PM you the ad, if you'd like. No affiliations with the seller.

  22. #22
    4 Niners
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,124
    You will definitely have to try SS. I was doubting I would like it but I had a Sir9 so it cost almost nothing to try it and let's just say my Jet is for sale.

    You could convert your old bike or buy the $500 one. I think you would like the 29er better even though I have never ridden a 26er SS the 29er's do conserve momentum better and riding SS is all about conserving momentum and planning ahead.

  23. #23
    openwound
    Reputation: voodoochild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    580
    As for suspension or rigid, you'll get a mix of responses here. One of the things that a rigid bike affords is less loss of energy due to fork compression as you're climbing. But of course front suspension is kinda nice once you head down hill. However, if you ride with a rigid front end, you'll quickly learn to stay loose and pick good lines -- and then when you jump on your geared front or full-suspension bike, you'll be that much faster.
    -- let's ride

  24. #24
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoochild
    ... and then when you jump on your geared front or full-suspension bike, you'll be that much faster.
    There are theories floating around that that may not be true. Can't remember where the thread is, but it has been discussed recently. Basically, it is two different types of riding (bombing straight through on a FS and zig-zaging through a "better line" on a rigid/HT), therefore, skill learned on one doesn't translate to better skills on the other.

    But geared vs SS, I do find I am much faster on my gearies (surprise).

  25. #25
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,212
    Quote Originally Posted by p nut
    Basically, it is two different types of riding (bombing straight through on a FS and zig-zaging through a "better line" on a rigid/HT), therefore, skill learned on one doesn't translate to better skills on the other.
    I am pretty sure that is correct. I cannot ride the rigid bike the same as I ride the hardtail (not to speak about a FS bike). If I rode a FS bike like I ride the rigid bike, I'd miss many of the "shortcuts" FS would allow me to take.

    Actually... I often take pretty rough lines on the rigid bike too. I get a beating doing it, even with otherwise rigid-adjusted riding style, but I enjoy the challenge.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  26. #26
    4 Niners
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,124
    I have 2 SS's (both 29ers) one has a suspension fork and one has a Niner Carbon fork. Last year I was liking the rigid bike better but I had a bad shoulder injury this Winter and now I am liking the hardtail better. I think a lot is personal preference and how much you are willing to work your upper body because the rigid does make you do more with your upper body.

    The rigid bike is lighter and wastes less energy on climbs. The hardtail lets you run over stuff you would want to avoid on the rigid. My overall speed is almost exactly the same on either bike on the courses I ride.

  27. #27
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    SS is fun and cheap. It will take getting used to but after a couple rides you either like it or don't. It's simple, there is no magic behind it. Run a gear that is low enough for you to climb with. You will climb out of the saddle a lot. This will mean spinning more on the flat sections and not really pedalling down hill. Depending on your local terrain, it may be more/less fun but it really is do-able just about anywhere. Clipless pedals will be your friend.

    Money is a key factor that keeps me on the rigid SS for strictly offroad riding. Gears and suspension are expensive and I'm perfectly happy on my SS 29er. I've had FS geared bikes so I know what you give up by not having those amenities anymore, but they are less necessary than many think. I like gears on the road and for CX racing which is why I have a geared cross bike, but for MTB, SS is good for me. 29ers are fun too, and for the terrain you mentioned I think you'd be happy with one.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    333
    Quote Originally Posted by CycleAddict
    SS is fun and cheap. It will take getting used to but after a couple rides you either like it or don't.

    I completely disagree that SS is cheap. It may be cheap to convert a bike and try it out but once someone realizes they enjoy it, let the upgrades begin

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    163
    Ss is awesome, I love it. I can focus more on riding and looking around.

  30. #30
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,366
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    I loved the bike in the 1980's but I'm pretty sure there have been a few improvements since then. I just need to find the modern bike for me.
    Your Fat Chance is steel, has canti studs and a 71 degree HA and is not suspension corrected. My Monocog Flight is steel, disc brake tabs, a 71 degree HA and is rigid 7-8 months of the year. You live in AZ, so the disc brakes are less of an issue than muddy Oregon and you did say you weren't going to do angry technical trails, so...

    I guess what I am saying is that most of the 26" hard tails owe a lot to you Fat Chance and in some ways, are clones.

    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    I have been waiting for the 29er fad to pass but it looks like they are here to stay and are in fact taking over the world. My 26" riding friends have threatened to make me wear flannel and hipster pants if I buy a 29er SS.
    I think 29ers were more of a fad when I had one three years ago. For your friends, just point out that flannel wicks while preventing sun damage, skinny jeans don't get caught in chains and protects legs against road rash. Then show them you mean business by walking up that next hill.

    If you can't demo one and you buy a 29er, I expect you will enjoy it. I like mine, just not as much as my 26" bike, so it rarely gets ridden. I do think it is important to understand that there are a lot of 29er/SS/etc homers out there. You mentioned being reluctant to part with much money, so I figured you can convert the Fat Chance, ride it around, find out if you like rigid or SS, then go from there.

    Depending on the condition and parts, I expect you could get 700 for your Chance pretty easy. Follow a couple on ebay for a month or so and you'll get a better idea.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,994

    It all depends on what you want to do:

    FS: for aggressive riding -- bombing downhills, hitting jumps and drops

    SS rigid: for bringing out the pure joy in riding. Reminds me of being a kid with a BMX bike

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    350
    To the OP,

    Go visit Ed at Southwest Sounds in Prescott. He is the local single speed guru. He has a small shop devoted to everything SS. He heped me this weekend at the Whisky 50 proof with gearing and gave me lots of pointers. He has a great selection of frames(Spot, Form, Vassago) and accessories.

  33. #33
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Just wanted to add Form frames are freaking beautiful.

  34. #34
    Got a suspension fork
    Reputation: randyharris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,442
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    ...RIIIGHT...
    I am replying to your post without reading others comments, just your post.

    My background: I started mountain biking in the late 80's and have had several multi year periods of not riding. But for the past several years I've been riding regularly and very much enjoying it. A few years ago it was time to get a new bike and I opted for a new 29er FS. Very confidence inspiring, I was extremely happy with it.

    After maybe 1000 miles on the bike, I started getting this unsettled feeling like everything was too easy. Simultaneously I started noticing some guys riding SS in my area (Phoenix, AZ). One thing led to another and I bought what I intended to be a second mtb, a steel frame 2011 Kona Unit rigid SS. After a few rides I was hooked and sold my FS. Have never looked back.

    All my rides are recorded from GPS, and I have checked the exact same rides on both the 29er FS and the 29er rigid SS. In general I match the exact same pace on both bikes. The difference being that I climb faster on the SS and descend slower but it is a rigid bike keep in mind. If I wanted to opt for a suspension fork no doubt I'd be faster on the SS.

    For me it's not about the ultimate speed or time of my ride - it really is about getting out and having fun. And for me, there is something freaking magical about a fully rigid 29er SS. I absolutely love mine. I could care less that a Fox or RockShocks would let me descend a little faster, the bike handles like a dream, is glued to the trail, pure simplicity in every regard.

    It may not be for everybody, but it suits me extremely well. I have to think it would be a sweet setup in Flag from what little experience I have of those trails.

    edit: Oh and for what it's worth, I don't feel that riding SS has made me a better rider, it's a different rhythm than geared. But I absolutely know that riding rigid has made me a much better rider.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  35. #35
    (Ali)
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    782
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    Everybody says that SS is more fun and even faster than gears.
    Hmmm. There is no need to repeat what you've already read. Maybe once more: Gears are not necessary. It is not fun working with gear problems.

    I just find that hard to believe.
    Stop watching commercials.

    It is hard enough getting up some of these climbs spinning in 24/34 gearing.
    Basic physics: it will be equally hard on an SS. Actually it will be a little easier on an SS, because you will be moving your legs less.

    How long after starting SS does it take for the magic strong leg juice to start flowing in your veins?
    Strangely, the weakest link for me has been the arms, especially the triceps. I started the SS after realizing that I could ride a long distance standing on the pedals.

    I swear there must be some sort of group hypnosis going on
    In the case of SS, it's mass awakening.

    Let me ask the question that I'm sure has been asked and answered in several other forms. Is ST for me?
    Yes.

    I live and ride in N. AZ (Prescott, Flagstaff) and enjoy riding single track with short technical sections but mostly just fun flowing up and down stuff.
    Seems like a good fit for SS'ing.

    I love climbing.
    Do you climb standing? Can you sustain a longish distance? You are ready for SS.

    My skinny legs don't have a lot of power though.
    Same here! It may also mean that you are lightweight. Good...

    I'm the guy on the mtb you hear dropping gears at the base of steep climbs and going granny gear before I hit the incline.
    You will become the guy who approaches the hill with some momentum and who stands up when the speed drops to that sweet spot. You will then dance up the hill, slowly... Zen... Poetry... (Argh! It's happening to me again: I started talking like an SS'er. )

    I am a simple guy
    Oh you know it! You know it! Welcome!

    Ali

  36. #36
    Blue Pig
    Reputation: Blksocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,553
    Strangely, the weakest link for me has been the arms, especially the triceps. I started the SS after realizing that I could ride a long distance standing on the pedals.
    Going to have to agree with you on that. I have issues with the arms fatiguing until I stand and mash.
    Ragley Blue Pig

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    Wow! Great replies.

    I haven't been into SW Cycles yet but thanks for reminding me about him.

    I am a sit down climber all the way so standing will be a big change although I rode a million miles in the AZ desert as a kid "pumping" up the hills on the single speed coaster brake homebrew BMX bikes I built before they were mass produced.

    I am currently in the middle of converting the Fat Chance with an Origin 8 conversion kit I picked up this afternoon at the LBS. Had to steal a wheel from my wife's bike since the old Fat C wheel has a free wheel hub. She will end up getting my old FSR which fits her better anyway. Hopefully I can get all the spacers right etc. since the kit doesn't come with instructions and I can't find them on their website. I'm assuming the tapered spacers go with the big flat side against the cog. I set up the tensioner about half way through its range. Sound right? If all goes well I will test it out tomorrow.

  38. #38
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,366
    I keep the chain as tight as I can with the tensioner, so it sounds like you are rawking it right.

    Dunno about the spacers, but it make SSense. I await a ride report.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    681
    HA! love it. Glad to hear a hater.
    I'm not sure whether or not you are referring to my comment about converting your Fat Chance, but it certainly wasn't meant as a hater statement.

    I ride ss almost exclusively and simply thought that, since you already own a bike, converting it is the easiest way to try ss

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ianick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,186
    You are correct. Spacers should look similar to this:



    If you decide you like SS'ing do yourself and your freehub a favor and get a wide based cog(Surly or similar). It will keep the cog from digging into the freehub.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ThreeD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    645
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    Wow! Great replies.
    I am currently in the middle of converting the Fat Chance with an Origin 8 conversion kit I picked up this afternoon at the LBS. Had to steal a wheel from my wife's bike since the old Fat C wheel has a free wheel hub. She will end up getting my old FSR which fits her better anyway. Hopefully I can get all the spacers right etc. since the kit doesn't come with instructions and I can't find them on their website. I'm assuming the tapered spacers go with the big flat side against the cog. I set up the tensioner about half way through its range. Sound right? If all goes well I will test it out tomorrow.
    I'd love to see some pictures of your fatty Seriously, post up some pictures of the Fat Chance. I never get tired of those bikes.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    Just went for the first ride on my freshly converted Fat Chance. Loved it! I get it. I'm sold. At one point I just started laughing out loud. The bike felt so much lighter and more crisp without all that noisy stuff banging around.

    I was over geared for the hilly trails here 36/18 but I still had fun and was able to ride 99.99% of it. Came home and swapped out to a 36/22. Much better. I immediately figured out a lot of the things I've heard the SS converts saying about momentum, picking lines, etc.

    Also got to ride my friend's Karate Monkey 29er SS geared 34/24. What a nice ride that was. I'm going to be shopping for a 29er SS for sure.

  43. #43
    Got a suspension fork
    Reputation: randyharris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,442
    Quote Originally Posted by st-rider
    Just went for the first ride on my freshly converted Fat Chance. Loved it! I get it. I'm sold. At one point I just started laughing out loud. The bike felt so much lighter and more crisp without all that noisy stuff banging around.

    I was over geared for the hilly trails here 36/18 but I still had fun and was able to ride 99.99% of it. Came home and swapped out to a 36/22. Much better. I immediately figured out a lot of the things I've heard the SS converts saying about momentum, picking lines, etc.

    Also got to ride my friend's Karate Monkey 29er SS geared 34/24. What a nice ride that was. I'm going to be shopping for a 29er SS for sure.
    Welcome to the club! Happy to hear you enjoyed it.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  44. #44
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,669
    Congrats man!! I've switched over to SS only for a while and am really glad I did.

    See, it's not all hype after all!
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vaultbrad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    884
    Like others have said, I'm always fiddling with my bikes, wrenching, changing things around, but I always find my way back to SS. To me it's just plain fun. Don't get me wrong, gears can be fun too, but SS takes out some of the un-fun variables and whittles it down to the bare necessities. In fact I think I'll take my SS out today and jump off some curbs and do wheelies!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    97

    not better, just different

    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris
    Oh and for what it's worth, I don't feel that riding SS has made me a better rider, it's a different rhythm than geared. But I absolutely know that riding rigid has made me a much better rider.
    Agreed!

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    34
    Oh, I hope I didn't screw this up.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=707726

  48. #48
    Carnivore
    Reputation: gila monster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    339

    OP st-rider got a 29er ss

    (I rediscovered my old login for mtbr so I'm back to my original gila monster and no longer st-rider.)

    Follow up.

    While searching for a bike for my daughter I came across a rigid KHS solo-one-se 29er SS for $200 with a bunch of extra gear. Had to do it. I have a couple of rides on it and I'm loving it. SS is for real and for me.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fromthecoast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    113
    I've only had my single speed for a few weeks but I too am enjoying it. Not having gears and dealing with less than perfect shifting has been very nice. With a little change in "strategery" off road, I haven't missed my gears. I think more than anything compared to my old hard tail I miss the front fork. One of those may be in my future, but maybe not, who knows. The simplicity of the SS is really like being a kid again.

  50. #50
    4 Niners
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,124
    I have both a SS with a susp. fork and without. I am faster on the one with suspension but I end up riding the full rigid the most just because I can come home and not have to clean the sliders or anything else. About every 5-6 rides I do the chain and give it a bath about monthly. On all my suspension bikes, I feel obligated to clean them at least some after every use in order to help preserve the seals.

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    200
    This past winter, I decked out my geared soft tail. I had a bunch of parts left over and decided to convert my old steel frame into single speed. One of my friends explained to me that I would be better off buying a surly frame. I looked around and found a good deal on a used one on ebay. I used to ride rigid geared hard tail, while it was fun, it was not for me. So I ended up replacing the Surly rigid fork with a Marzocchi Z1, which I rebuilt with enduro seals. Ever since the first ride, I can't get enough of the SS; it's addicting and I feel that SS made me a lot more aggressive rider. Glad to hear that you like SS!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.