Does SS make technical sections more difficult?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 77 of 77
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?

    I'm a road rider who just bought a mountain bike last year. First of all, I live in the Denver area. After going with some friends mountain biking last year I found that I hated technical stuff. I crashed a lot, and just generally don't need the possibility of physical harm to get my adrenaline rush.

    My friends probably took me on stuff that was too advanced for my capabilities (despite trying I still can't bunny hop, for instance). But then I learned about XC riding. It seems harder to find those trails here in the Rockies, but I'm interested in things that aren't too technical, but can be a good workout physically. Fire-roads and trails without large drop-offs or obstacles.

    In light of that, I'm thinking of going single speed. I found I was so focused on just not crashing that I rarely thought to change gears anyway. But here's my question, for the occasional times when I'm hoodwinked into going on a semi-technical trail will being SS hurt me more? I can see it being more difficult if I'm going uphill and I might have to worry about spinning out, but downhill it shouldn't matter (I'm a big guy, 6'5" and 190 lbs). I've ridden SS on a road bike before, but I guess I'm wondering if it's a bad idea for someone to go SS who isn't good with bike handling on singletrack.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: the munts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    281
    First of all, I'm sorry that you're a roadie . But bad bike handling is bad bike handling. The SS doesn't matter. Enjoy the fire roads, and hit some easy trails to work on your skills a little. But once you stop worrying about crashing, you'll do it less. You're probably more capable than you think. Just get out of your head
    read KNOBBY MEATS or be sadly ignorant of the mediocrity that is allowed to exist in the interwebs

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by the munts
    You're probably more capable than you think. Just get out of your head
    I think that's probably right. Being used to riding on the road I avoid pebbles and dips in the asphalt. All of the sudden being expected to ride over logs and rocks and stumps just freaks me out. I think once I get used to it I will do better, I just look at things and think "I'm not supposed to be able to ride over that!"

  4. #4
    Monkey Junkie
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    593
    SS is more difficult going up hill no matter what. I guess it could add another difficult variable to already difficult climbs, but as the munts said...handling is handling. You will need to get used to grinding out of the saddle on most climbs, but work on your bike control either way. Balance is a key factor. Practice riding across curbs in between driveways without falling into the grass or off into the street.

  5. #5
    nothing to see here
    Reputation: Stevob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,270
    Quote Originally Posted by the munts
    First of all, I'm sorry that you're a roadie
    Thanks, I just nearly p!ssed myself laughing.
    I see hills.

    I want to climb them.

  6. #6
    Nervous Descender
    Reputation: Adirondack Blues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    717
    Although SS can make some things easier (simply because you approach in a higher gear and with more speed), I think SS requires more commitment on big technical moves- especially big ledges and climbing steep rock moves. You either hit the move with enough speed and technique, or you will stall out and bad stuff can happen.
    Check out some of our local hills: CDRC (Capital District Road Climbs)

  7. #7
    Did I catch a niner+?
    Reputation: Mr Pink57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,954
    I think its much harder to go thru rocks on a uphill with a SS. I road my first true SS today and at night no less. There are quite a few rocks on this trail and 3 or 4 rock gardens (rigid also). I did not notice it to really be any harder, just plan your line as you go and it will be smooth. I do however have the advantage of having been riding this trail for almost 10 years

    pink
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  8. #8
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,553
    A good setup helps too. Having a rear hub with more engagement will allow you to ratchet through tech areas more easily. Ratcheting will keep you from hitting the dead spot so that you can rely more on torque to get you through.

  9. #9
    Dirty South Underdog
    Reputation: Andrea138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,727
    I'm a roadie convert, and I was in your position about a year ago as far as my lack of technical skills. I learned everything on a geared bike, and I've improved a lot, but found that I improved more when I started SSing since it made me ride more aggressively to get through technical spots (I don't even have a SS bike right now, but after the first time I tried one, now I "self impose" SS training by picking a gear at the beginning of my ride and not shifting- even if it means I'm gonna get off & hike )

    Can't wait to get the real thing... my problem is that I've got expensive taste in bikes, so it takes some saving.
    Last edited by Andrea138; 04-16-2010 at 06:53 AM.
    Brickhouse Blog (most known unknown)

    Just Riding Along- best internet radio show on Mountain Bike Radio

  10. #10
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    Your question really should read:

    "Does a SS make technical sections more fun?"
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-dscn4096.jpg  

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-dscn4072.jpg  

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-twhound.jpg  

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-splitrockhound.jpg  

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-9.jpg  

    Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-dscn4029.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Aquaholic; 04-16-2010 at 07:53 AM.
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    You're question really should read:

    "Does a SS make technical sections more fun?"
    That's some pretty amazing stuff. Perhaps I should re-iterate my question. I have no desire to do anything nearly as difficult as what you posted. I know that GOOD riders can handle technical sections with SS just fine. My question is, for someone like me with poor techinical ability, will SS make it even more difficult for me? Keeping in mind I plan on doing basic XC stuff, this is just for the occasional time when something a little harder than what I'm comfortable with comes along.

  12. #12
    Dirty South Underdog
    Reputation: Andrea138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,727
    I say it will be more difficult at first, but it will eventually make you much better because it will teach (force?) you to ride to/through tough spots with more momentum.

    BTW- Aqua... Love the WTF?!? look from the hiker in the last pic
    Brickhouse Blog (most known unknown)

    Just Riding Along- best internet radio show on Mountain Bike Radio

  13. #13
    Making fat cool since '71
    Reputation: ImaKlyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,840
    For me (soundly un-fit but technically capable) I've not found my SS riding to make things more technical than when on gears...however not having the rear suspension can make me slow down significantly in super rocky/rooty sections (climbing or descending) of course but I don't find it's due to only having one gear. It's more that *I* have to do for myself what my full squish does for me on the same sections if that makes any sense. The lack of gear choices just works my legs/lungs more. Maybe I made sense in there somewhere. I think the short answer for me: no.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  14. #14
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077

    Wtf??!!!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138

    BTW- Aqua... Love the WTF?!? look from the hiker in the last pic

    El-Ohhh-El!

    Yeah...I get that occasionally.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-sedonasbg2.jpg  

    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by ImaKlyde
    For me (soundly un-fit but technically capable) I've not found my SS riding to make things more technical than when on gears...however not having the rear suspension can make me slow down significantly in super rocky/rooty sections (climbing or descending) of course but I don't find it's due to only having one gear. It's more that *I* have to do for myself what my full squish does for me on the same sections if that makes any sense. The lack of gear choices just works my legs/lungs more. Maybe I made sense in there somewhere. I think the short answer for me: no.

    Brock...
    That helps, thanks. I just started mountain biking last year and I have an entry level hard-tail bike. So I wouldn't even have the ability to compare against a FS bike. I was mostly just looking at making my existing bike SS.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    1,195
    Hey you sound just like me (except the roadie part). You stated your objective clearly - you ride ss for workout, not for adrenaline rush. Go on, put your time in and just ignore people telling you to "just try man." I for one don't need any more broken bones.

    Green Mountain has no techy stuff. So yes, you can ride your ss with no skills in Denver area to get a good workout. Different stroke for different folks.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    1. Single speed makes EVERYTHING harder. No point to it. What you want is as many gears and as many inches of travel as you can get!

    2. Around Denver and the front range, there are plenty of trails that are only mildly technical. Much less technical overall than where I came from in Tucson.
    You just need to find the trails you like and stop going with D-bags who take a beginner on super hard stuff that makes you crash. Even the trails around Buffalo creek, which are considered some of the best around here (and around anywhere), are pretty fast and smooth.
    Buy a good trail book like a Falcon, which has ratings for both strenuosity and technicality.

    3. Aquaholic, awesome pictures! That's a cool Huffy you have there!

  18. #18
    master blaster
    Reputation: veloreality's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1,149
    ss is easier for me in technical sections.
    with a geared bike i usually am in a higher gear for tech stuff otherwise i have an issue with tipping over.
    no worry about snagging a $280 carbon derailuer on a rock while zig zaggin through rocks with a single speed either.
    Quote Originally Posted by ISuckAtRiding View Post
    The dude is like 120lbs, tops lol he can run any tires he wants without issues, i'm sure.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mighty Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    584
    try a 29er w/ front suspension. vassago makes a nice ss for a reasonable cost. 29er wheels should help especially at your height.

    http://vassagocycles.com/jabberwocky.html
    Ride & Smile

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    362
    Practice, practice, practice...

    Work on technical skills in a parking lot. Bunny hop lines first and move to curbs. Work on going up, down, sideway on curbs and parking thingies. You will eventually get good. Work on leg strength, squats, forward lunges, and backward lunges. I do yoga and palates and it helps tremendously…

    I spend countless hours doing urban assault. Jumping everything and anything.....Try riding up a very steep hill as slow as possible where you’re almost not moving. It takes more skill to go slow than to go fast.

    When you’re riding something technical it has to be 100% with no fear or you will be your own worst enemy.
    26FS & 29Rigid... best of both worlds

  21. #21
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    XC doesn't involve technical sections??

    A roadie that can't bunnyhop.... Merckx would not approve.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    XC doesn't involve technical sections??

    A roadie that can't bunnyhop.... Merckx would not approve.
    Yes, yes, I know I suck. I'm trying to change that but for some reason it's not happening overnight. Any constructive suggestions?

    In case you couldn't tell I'm new to mountain biking. My impression was that XC wasn't as technical as All Mountain or Downhill. Am I wrong? I'm sure there are technical parts, it's all relative.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty Matt
    try a 29er w/ front suspension. vassago makes a nice ss for a reasonable cost. 29er wheels should help especially at your height.

    http://vassagocycles.com/jabberwocky.html
    I guess I should have said that I do have a 29er with front suspension, but it's a Dart 3.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    2. Around Denver and the front range, there are plenty of trails that are only mildly technical. Much less technical overall than where I came from in Tucson.
    Thanks for the suggestions. I posted a question about trails that aren't too technical in the regional forum and didn't get many good suggestions. I will get the book as you suggest, but are there any others that you know of off the top of your head?

  25. #25
    Occasionally engaged…
    Reputation: Ptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,639
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    My question is, for someone like me with poor techinical ability, will SS make it even more difficult for me?
    You're pretty much describing me -- poor technical ability, likes SS for XC rides, don't need to get my adrenalin rush through crashing...

    Anyway, SS has no effect on technical stuff on the flats or downhills for me -- I ride rigid when multi-geared and when SS, so it's the same only different. I make more stuff going uphill on the SS than when using the multi-geared bike -- so I think I'm better technically on a SS. My advice is stick with the SS and don't worry about walking anything that takes you too far out of your comfort zone. And since you're a roadie, you can probably put the hurt on your "pals" on the climbs as a form of payback...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    Thanks for the suggestions. I posted a question about trails that aren't too technical in the regional forum and didn't get many good suggestions. I will get the book as you suggest, but are there any others that you know of off the top of your head?
    What part of town are you in? Also, where did your buddies take you, just to get an idea of what was too technical for you?

    I live in Castle Rock and there are some pretty good beginner/intermediate trails around there. Like Hidden Mesa, Rhyolite park, and Ridgeline.
    Monument Preserve in Monument has good easy trails down below, and technical up higher on Mt. Herman.
    The Falcon trail at the Air Force Acadamy has about 15 miles of good single track, with some technical but mostly light technical.
    Like I mentioned, Buffalo Creek and all the trails around there are pretty smooth, or long smooth sections mixed with some technical. Can't remember all the names.
    Alderfur 3 sisters in Evergreen isn't bad.
    The Mountain lion/Burro loop at Golden Gate Canyon is a pretty good one. Tough climbs but not really that technical.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    416
    It kind of depends really. The biggest variable/difficulty is picking the correct gear ratio for the trail you're riding, it ends up being a game of give and take.

    Think about it, most trials riders use a single speed, a fixed gear single speed at that and it doesn't get much more technical than trials.

    One thing I can't help notice in every one of Aquaholic's pics is that he's going down hill. I'ts amazing how a little down hill momentum can help you clean things you never thought you could, single speed or geared. Uphill is a different story...

  28. #28
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    Yes, yes, I know I suck. I'm trying to change that but for some reason it's not happening overnight. Any constructive suggestions?

    In case you couldn't tell I'm new to mountain biking. My impression was that XC wasn't as technical as All Mountain or Downhill. Am I wrong? I'm sure there are technical parts, it's all relative.

    When you come upon a technical section, stand, get your weight back, keep your joints loose while maintaining grip, and pedal(if necessary). If there's a section you feel is way above your skill level, get off and walk through it. Go to youtube and look up tutorials on log crossings, bunnyhopping, riding up ledges and the like. The main difference between mountain biking and road riding is the addition of technical skills. On an easy day, go out and work on your technical skills. Find a section of trail that you find challenging and ride it over and over. Keep working on it till you get it. Be prepared to fall, repeatedly, while learning.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Be prepared to fall, repeatedly, while learning.
    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I will end up doing that (I have looked at a lot of the videos and read a lot, but that doesn't really get me too far). But I must admit it's sentences like this that leave me scratching my head a little bit. Maybe I'm crazy, but that just doesn't sound like fun. Perhaps the pay off in the end is worth it, but I choose a hobby because it's fun, not because it sucks in the moment but will be fun when I learn later down the road. That's what work, college, life, saving for retirement, etc. is for. I have a hobby to get away from miserable things, not to practice delayed gratification yet again. And bicycling is a hobby to me, I'm not doing this to train for something or learn great life lessons.

    Sorry to wax philosophical. I guess I do belong on the road. I just love doing the mountain passes around here and think I would enjoy it more if there were no cars. I would like to improve my technical ability though, I just need to start a little smaller.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    What part of town are you in? Also, where did your buddies take you, just to get an idea of what was too technical for you?
    I live in southeast Aurora. The biggest one that I struggled with was the Roxborough Loop. Interestingly enough I was fine on the uphill, but I had a bunch of problems on the downhill, including a taco'd wheel. I may have had to put my foot down once uphill, but downhill I repeatedly put my foot down and fell over.

    My first ride was actually at Hidden Mesa. Unfortunately my friends don't like climbing so they just started us out at the top near the rock garden. It was uber cold that day so we rode briefly. It was mostly fine but there were a couple of rock sections where I struggled and ended up tumbling.

    I did a beginner ride with a local club at Bear Creek Lake park and that was a piece of cake.

  31. #31
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut

    One thing I can't help notice in every one of Aquaholic's pics is that he's going down hill. I'ts amazing how a little down hill momentum can help you clean things you never thought you could, single speed or geared. Uphill is a different story...
    The thing with uphills is..... one must pick and choose their own battles.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Does SS make technical sections more difficult?-deadman-bw.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  32. #32
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    The thing with uphills is..... one must pick and choose their own battles.
    nice pics all around dooshaholic

    its amazing how well you ride and how focused you remain at all times


  33. #33
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    I never found SS to be more difficult technically, but like Andrea138 I found it upped my game. Before SS, considered myself merely an adequate XC rider. Now I'll ride any thing naturally in the trail. I won't throw myself off a ten foot ledge, but technical New England singletrack is no problem.

  34. #34
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    Going down a hill, I don't see SS making anything more difficult.

    Going up or on level ground, it is sometimes easier to run out of momentum or torque, SS. You have to commit to hitting stuff and keeping up some speed, instead of tip-toeing over things. Or you may have to make a judgement call to walk, if it looks like the obstacle could actually be dangerous if you stall.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    The thing with uphills is..... one must pick and choose their own battles.
    That second pic plays into my point that it is a game of give and take. What is that a 28 or 30 tooth front ring. Either way if you go with a gear like that so you can clean the uphils it's rendered fairly useless on any significant downhill grade and straight flat.

    BTW - don't take either of my posts as a personal attack, I'm not doubting your ability as a rider, your pics just happen to be available for use in this thread, it could have been anybody. I'm only using them to help answer the OP's question and basically go along with what several others have said, downhill no, uphill yes.

    But i do have to ask, is that an X.0 rear shifter and RD I see in the second photo?

  36. #36
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077

    Busted!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut
    That second pic plays into my point that it is a game of give and take. What is that a 28 or 30 tooth front ring. Either way if you go with a gear like that so you can clean the uphils it's rendered fairly useless on any significant downhill grade and straight flat.

    BTW - don't take either of my posts as a personal attack, I'm not doubting your ability as a rider, your pics just happen to be available for use in this thread, it could have been anybody. I'm only using them to help answer the OP's question and basically go along with what several others have said, downhill no, uphill yes.

    But i do have to ask, is that an X.0 rear shifter and RD I see in the second photo?
    Crap. Good eye! I did (initially) have the bike setup as a 1X4.

    That's a 32 toother up front. While on the flats, I do spin wildly like a hamster on a wheel . But, that's the price I pay. These long grinding climbs make my knees smoke as it is.

    Anyhoo....good thread. Let's see some ride pics from your neck of the woods.



    AhhhhQua


    PS Phuck off.....Pho!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Aquaholic; 04-17-2010 at 06:56 AM.
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    So what's the tooth count on the rear cog/freewheel? I was thinking of going 32/20 on my 29er just to be able to make the climbs as well. Input?

  38. #38
    achiever
    Reputation: redwarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    929
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Be prepared to fall, repeatedly, while learning.
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I will end up doing that (I have looked at a lot of the videos and read a lot, but that doesn't really get me too far). But I must admit it's sentences like this that leave me scratching my head a little bit. Maybe I'm crazy, but that just doesn't sound like fun. Perhaps the pay off in the end is worth it, but I choose a hobby because it's fun, not because it sucks in the moment but will be fun when I learn later down the road. That's what work, college, life, saving for retirement, etc. is for. I have a hobby to get away from miserable things, not to practice delayed gratification yet again. And bicycling is a hobby to me, I'm not doing this to train for something or learn great life lessons.

    Sorry to wax philosophical. I guess I do belong on the road. I just love doing the mountain passes around here and think I would enjoy it more if there were no cars. I would like to improve my technical ability though, I just need to start a little smaller.

    I don't intend to be insulting but it sounds like maybe you really do belong on the road. Not that there is anything wrong with that, mind you. I ride road all the time... commuting, climbing, base mileage, etc. If you want to learn how to ride off road, of course you're going to crash, rules of the game. When you learned to ride when you were a kid, did you just hop on and ride without falling? Probably not... I really don't think there is any way to learn the bike handling skills that you'll need without a little bit of fear or pain. Obviously, you don't want to start on the type of terrain Aqua has in his pics but eventually, you're going to have to nut up and do it or don't, know what I mean? Not to go all Yoda on you but to have it not "suck in the moment" you actually have to be in the moment: let go of your fear, feel the flow and let 'em roll. You just might surprise yourself!

    Good luck,


    Red

  39. #39
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,276
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    So what's the tooth count on the rear cog/freewheel? I was thinking of going 32/20 on my 29er just to be able to make the climbs as well. Input?
    ask somebody from FL or the midwest and its too easy. ask somebody who lives in CO or SoCal, who actually RIDES up the steep hills regularly etc. and all of a sudden it makes sense for sure to use a 22t out back. ultimately, who cares...the SSers that call others out due to gearing are the no-penis poseurs anyway

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    I live in southeast Aurora. The biggest one that I struggled with was the Roxborough Loop. Interestingly enough I was fine on the uphill, but I had a bunch of problems on the downhill, including a taco'd wheel. I may have had to put my foot down once uphill, but downhill I repeatedly put my foot down and fell over.

    My first ride was actually at Hidden Mesa. Unfortunately my friends don't like climbing so they just started us out at the top near the rock garden. It was uber cold that day so we rode briefly. It was mostly fine but there were a couple of rock sections where I struggled and ended up tumbling.

    I did a beginner ride with a local club at Bear Creek Lake park and that was a piece of cake.
    I haven't done Roxborough.
    Hidden Mesa climb up from Parker road is all smooth except the last 1/4 mile. Too bad you skipped that part.
    The rocks on top can be as challenging as you want. there are a couple of spots I still get off the bike. Once you learn the trail, you can find the lines that you can handle.
    I think roadies are just unaccustomed to getting off the bike. You can't expect to clean everything on a trail no matter where you are. Nothing wrong with getting off occasionally.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    ...Let's see some ride pics from your neck of the woods.
    I'm a YouTube novice so bear with me here in case this doesn't work. Plus you might want to mute it because there is annoting clacking sound throughout the whole thing from the cam rattleing ever so slightly in the mount. It was shot in 960p but the resolution doesn't look so good, I think maybe Youtube automatically reduces it down.

    <object width="640" height="505"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/zGPqsIIkkjM&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&hd=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/zGPqsIIkkjM&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&hd=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="505"></embed></object>

    Although I'm not on my SS here SE MI trails are the perfect place to ride one. Tight, twisty, flowing purpose built singletrack with short scrambling uphills that are all very doable in a trail friendly gear as long as you know they are coming and keep up your momentum. My SS is fully rigid and I thought I would get a smoother video on a bike with a suspension fork.

  42. #42
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I will end up doing that (I have looked at a lot of the videos and read a lot, but that doesn't really get me too far). But I must admit it's sentences like this that leave me scratching my head a little bit. Maybe I'm crazy, but that just doesn't sound like fun. Perhaps the pay off in the end is worth it, but I choose a hobby because it's fun, not because it sucks in the moment but will be fun when I learn later down the road. That's what work, college, life, saving for retirement, etc. is for. I have a hobby to get away from miserable things, not to practice delayed gratification yet again. And bicycling is a hobby to me, I'm not doing this to train for something or learn great life lessons.

    Sorry to wax philosophical. I guess I do belong on the road. I just love doing the mountain passes around here and think I would enjoy it more if there were no cars. I would like to improve my technical ability though, I just need to start a little smaller.

    My view on falling:

    As long as there's no major damage, it's good for you. If your body doesn't think it needs impact resistant bones, it wont keep working to make them strong. If all you do is ride road and never really stress your skeletal system, you're going to be at higher risk later in life for brittle bones and osteoporosis. Falling reminds your body that your skeletal structure needs to be strong.

    I may have a slightly skewed perspective on the matter coming from a trials and bmx street background.

  43. #43
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    Pics...

    two photos from one piece of trail. First from the flat part. Just pick which rock to roll over and which you want to avoid:


    the slope in the middle. Going this way: one mistake and you stall; the other way: just watch a few rocks ahead and keep moving.


    ----

    a few rocks in the background. There's some tiresome roots further back in the woods.


    not really a ledge but some sort of a step anyway. There's three or four more of these further back, together with some roots and slalom around the trees.


    I like this definition of technical: it is technical if your ability to turn the cranks is not the thing limiting your speed: your ability to cope with the terrain features (obstacles) is the limiting factor.

  44. #44
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,317
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    As long as there's no major damage, it's good for you. If your body doesn't think it needs impact resistant bones, it wont keep working to make them strong. If all you do is ride road and never really stress your skeletal system, you're going to be at higher risk later in life for brittle bones and osteoporosis. Falling reminds your body that your skeletal structure needs to be strong.

    I may have a slightly skewed perspective on the matter coming from a trials and bmx street background.
    Don't take this wrong, but falling does nothing to promote bone strength. You are correct that road riding and bike riding in general is not good for bones. Bones respond much better to exercise involving gravity (running), or weightlifting. Falling really does nothing unless you are doing it 100 times a day I guess. The big hits don't promote bone growth, it is all the micro hits that stimulate it.

    I think the best riding activity for bones is probably riding rigid SS, but it still pales in comparison to running as far as the shock received to the system.

    BMX/trials guys are badazz and seem to not really care if they fall.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  45. #45
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Don't take this wrong, but falling does nothing to promote bone strength. You are correct that road riding and bike riding in general is not good for bones. Bones respond much better to exercise involving gravity (running), or weightlifting. Falling really does nothing unless you are doing it 100 times a day I guess. The big hits don't promote bone growth, it is all the micro hits that stimulate it.

    I think the best riding activity for bones is probably riding rigid SS, but it still pales in comparison to running as far as the shock received to the system.

    BMX/trials guys are badazz and seem to not really care if they fall.

    No offense taken. I'm not even close to a doctor of anything. It was just a theory. In my view though, anything short of breaking a bone is a micro hit.

  46. #46
    Birthday Collector
    Reputation: ATBScott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    2,603
    32 x 20 is a good all-round gear for hillier terrain (if you are on a 29"). You will probably still walk stuff on occasion, but that is part of SS. If you have some really long extended climbs you might even want to go to 22t in the rear. If you are on a 26" wheel, figure that two teeth off the rear in this case will be equivalent gears...
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    298
    Where I ride in southern Indiana there are some pretty extended (and technical) climbs. I have a 24 speed and a SS. The SS is full rigid and makes me really work and think about my line more going uphill. I can't just spin a low gear and go over anything in my way. I was running a 32x18 on my SS but when I go to ride my bike, I would like to ride my bike instead of walk beside it. To make the hills a bit easier I out a 22T on back and its a world of difference. SS IMO isn't harder, it is more challenging in that you have to worry more about momentum, line, etc. It is wicked fun though!

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    335

    Huh!?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut
    Think about it, most trials riders use a single speed, a fixed gear single speed at that and it doesn't get much more technical than trials.
    Did no one else catch this? Trials riders are most certainly not riding "fixed" gears.
    Most run CK hubs. Others the WI freewheel. You ever notice that the WI freewheel actually is a trials freewheel? They may run a fixed cog out back and a WI freewheel threaded onto the crank. Most trials moves are based of the ratcheting technique, so a fixed gear bike would be worthless.
    no chain no gain.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    416
    Quote Originally Posted by 10speedbiopacefreewheel
    Did no one else catch this? Trials riders are most certainly not riding "fixed" gears.
    Most run CK hubs. Others the WI freewheel. You ever notice that the WI freewheel actually is a trials freewheel? They may run a fixed cog out back and a WI freewheel threaded onto the crank. Most trials moves are based of the ratcheting technique, so a fixed gear bike would be worthless.
    You could be/probably are right, I'll admit I'm not a big trials guy. In the few pieces of vidoes I've seen it looked like when they pedaled backwards the bike went backwards which I think would mean a fixed gear, no?

    Either way, my point being I think we would all agree trials is about as technical as it gets and fixed or not they're on a SS.

  50. #50
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut
    You could be/probably are right, I'll admit I'm not a big trials guy. In the few pieces of vidoes I've seen it looked like when they pedaled backwards the bike went backwards which I think would mean a fixed gear, no?

    Either way, my point being I think we would all agree trials is about as technical as it gets and fixed or not they're on a SS.

    (I caught it earlier but didn't feel the need to comment on it)

    It's not that the pedaling backward causes their bike to go backward, it's that their bike going backward causes the pedals to spin backward. It does it on ALL freewheel/freehub bikes. Go out to the garage/shed/tarp, pick your bike up by the seat, and spin the back wheel in reverse. Watch what the cranks do.

    Trials bikes absolutely, definitely use a coasting mechanism.

  51. #51
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,317
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Trials bikes absolutely, definitely use a coasting mechanism.
    But not all trials riders are opposed to fixed.

    <object width="600" height="338"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="600" height="338"></embed></object>

    Reposted because this video is amazing and I love it.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  52. #52
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Definitely a worthwhile video to post repeatedly.

  53. #53
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Don't take this wrong, but falling does nothing to promote bone strength. You are correct that road riding and bike riding in general is not good for bones. Bones respond much better to exercise involving gravity (running), or weightlifting. Falling really does nothing unless you are doing it 100 times a day I guess. The big hits don't promote bone growth, it is all the micro hits that stimulate it.

    I think the best riding activity for bones is probably riding rigid SS, but it still pales in comparison to running as far as the shock received to the system.

    BMX/trials guys are badazz and seem to not really care if they fall.
    with all due respect, unless you are a chiropractor you really shouldn't be giving medical advice to people on the internet - its best to leave things like this to the experts...seriously.

    on the off chance you are in the aforementioned profession, will doing piledrivers headfirst into a rockgarden be helpful in my spine recovery? Sean may be onto something in which case I can expedite my recovery and return to full procore sooner than later. Thanks in advance
    Last edited by FoShizzle; 04-18-2010 at 11:52 AM.

  54. #54
    Which way? Uphill.
    Reputation: nepbug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    833
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    So what's the tooth count on the rear cog/freewheel? I was thinking of going 32/20 on my 29er just to be able to make the climbs as well. Input?
    I'm on the front range as well. 32/20 is a good starting point. I started there and then went to a 32/22, for me it makes all of Green Mountain and Falcon rideable without having to take a break to stop feeling like I'm going to die.

    If you do much riding around your neck of the woods you'll want 32/20 or even 32/18 with flats and small rollers. If you venture over to the Front Range then you'll probably want 32/22 with your prior statements of not wanting a lot of pain/suffering when out riding.

    For trail suggestions I'd say Green Mountain (certain trails, if it's too technical for you try a different one), BCLP (you've been here), North Table Mountain and Centennial Cone. If you head up towards Boulder there's Marshall Mesa as well, and there's several more in the Loveland/Ft Collins area too. Mt Falcon is also not that technical, at least most of the trails there; the Castle Trail climb has a few spots right at the bottom, but then it's all just a grunt of a climb.
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  55. #55
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    with all due respect, unless you are a chiropractor you really shouldn't be giving medical advice to people on the internet - its best to leave things like this to the experts...seriously.

    on the off chance you are in the aforementioned profession, will doing piledrivers headfirst into a rockgarden be helpful in my spine recovery? Sean may be onto something in which case I can expedite my recovery and return to full procore sooner than later. Thanks in advance

    For you, highly recommended!

    Is your spine injury damage to bone, or damage to the soft tissues between the bone? It should be noted that crashing hard enough to break bones drastically increases ones power and skill as it relates to E-riding.

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by nepbug
    If you venture over to the Front Range then you'll probably want 32/22 with your prior statements of not wanting a lot of pain/suffering when out riding.
    Thanks for the suggestions, very helpful. I don't want pain/suffering that comes from crashing, but the pain/suffering that comes from a good workout is just fine :-)

    Where does one acquire a 22T cog or SS freewheel? Everywhere I look (JensonUSA, PricePoint, etc.) I pretty much see 20 as a maximum, sometimes the offerings only go up to 18.

  57. #57
    Nat
    Nat is online now
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    13,349
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    with all due respect, unless you are a chiropractor you really shouldn't be giving medical advice to people on the internet - its best to leave things like this to the experts...seriously.

    on the off chance you are in the aforementioned profession, will doing piledrivers headfirst into a rockgarden be helpful in my spine recovery? Sean may be onto something in which case I can expedite my recovery and return to full procore sooner than later. Thanks in advance
    To build bone density take Fo-samax.

  58. #58
    dying hurts.
    Reputation: johnny the boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    579
    this doesn't look technical at all!


  59. #59
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    For you, highly recommended!

    Is your spine injury damage to bone, or damage to the soft tissues between the bone? It should be noted that crashing hard enough to break bones drastically increases ones power and skill as it relates to E-riding.

    Fo's spinal injury had nothing to do with riding bicycles. It was simply that his spine could no longer take the strain of supporting that massive, GI-normous forehead.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  60. #60
    Which way? Uphill.
    Reputation: nepbug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    833
    Quote Originally Posted by cooleric1234
    Thanks for the suggestions, very helpful. I don't want pain/suffering that comes from crashing, but the pain/suffering that comes from a good workout is just fine :-)

    Where does one acquire a 22T cog or SS freewheel? Everywhere I look (JensonUSA, PricePoint, etc.) I pretty much see 20 as a maximum, sometimes the offerings only go up to 18.
    My 22T cog is made by Surly, I haven't ever looked for a 22T freewheel. You can get them online, but I found it just as easy and the same price (maybe better, depending on shipping) by going to the LBS.

    Most shops can order you one if they don't have it in stock. I think I ordered mine on a Thursday and I got it the next Tuesday or something. Expect to pay about $30.

    Here's a Surly cog at Jenson that's showing the 22T
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...y+Bmx+Cog.aspx
    Blog

    Just keep spinning. Just keep running. Just keep paddling.
    Just keep moving forward.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    6,551
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    But not all trials riders are opposed to fixed.

    <object width="600" height="338"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="600" height="338"></embed></object>

    Reposted because this video is amazing and I love it.
    Wow, just wow!

  62. #62
    LET'S GO RIDE BIKES!
    Reputation: robbyracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    233
    Quote Originally Posted by Just J
    Wow, just wow!
    Yeah. I've watched it like 5 times now.
    Robb
    Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    Canondale Synapse w/DuraAce goodness

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,120
    The only larger freewheels (20 thru 22) that I know of are from White Industries and they are pretty pricey. But they last a long time.

    Single speed makes climbing technical sections harder. A full-suspension bike with gears makes it easier. Downhill, the lack of gears doesn't matter and is actually nicer since you don't have to worry about chainslap or the chain bouncing off the chainring.

  64. #64
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    ACS make a 22t freewheel.

  65. #65
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    Quote Originally Posted by Stahr_Nut

    Although I'm not on my SS here SE MI trails are the perfect place to ride one. Tight, twisty, flowing purpose built singletrack with short scrambling uphills that are all very doable in a trail friendly gear as long as you know they are coming and keep up your momentum. My SS is fully rigid and I thought I would get a smoother video on a bike with a suspension fork.
    Stahr:

    That look's really familiar....Treefarm? Poto?

    SE Michigan trails are ideal for single-speeding! Do you ever take the singlespeed out to Highland? That trail seems to be more of a challenge than the others down there.
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  66. #66
    ... I guess you won't be
    Reputation: jokermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,942
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquaholic
    Stahr:

    That look's really familiar....Treefarm? Poto?

    SE Michigan trails are ideal for single-speeding! Do you ever take the singlespeed out to Highland? That trail seems to be more of a challenge than the others down there.
    Aqua - that's a trail that's very close to my house. It's in Maybury State Park and it's about 6 1/2 miles long, and very tight and twisty. Pretty much a slot car racing track, where you really can only go so fast before you fly off the track and impale yourself. Awesome trail for people who can handle....


  67. #67
    Peace & Love
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    17,276
    Quote Originally Posted by jokermtb
    Aqua - that's a trail that's very close to my house. It's in Maybury State Park and it's about 6 1/2 miles long, and very tight and twisty. Pretty much a slot car racing track, where you really can only go so fast before you fly off the track and impale yourself. Awesome trail for people who can handle....

    Dear Aqua, I feel strongly that you should go check out that singletrack and love it so much that you will not return to SoCal. Thanks in advance

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mighty Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    584
    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    But not all trials riders are opposed to fixed.

    <object width="600" height="338"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=9824201&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=ff9933&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="600" height="338"></embed></object>

    Reposted because this video is amazing and I love it.
    i take that one and raise you this one.


    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Z19zFlPah-o&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Z19zFlPah-o&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    i am pretty sure everyone has seen this one though
    Ride & Smile

  69. #69
    Powered by ice cream.
    Reputation: Enel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,317
    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty Matt
    i take that one and raise you this one.

    i am pretty sure everyone has seen this one though
    Macaskill uses his freewheel as a crutch.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    298
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    ACS make a 22t freewheel.
    That's what I've got!

  71. #71
    LET'S GO RIDE BIKES!
    Reputation: robbyracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    233
    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty Matt
    i take that one and raise you this one.


    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Z19zFlPah-o&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Z19zFlPah-o&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

    i am pretty sure everyone has seen this one though
    I haven't. WOW! Amazing skills.
    Robb
    Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    Canondale Synapse w/DuraAce goodness

  72. #72
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    That MacAskill guy is impressive but I prefer this style:

    <object width="400" height="321"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2924815&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2924815&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="400" height="321"></embed></object><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/2924815">Brakeless Two / Chris Akrigg</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user1089639">chris akrigg</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

    (and Chris Akrigg does it brakeles)
    Last edited by perttime; 04-23-2010 at 11:19 AM.

  73. #73
    Negative Rep Points!!!!
    Reputation: Aquaholic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,077
    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    Dear Aqua, I feel strongly that you should go check out that singletrack and love it so much that you will not return to SoCal. Thanks in advance
    STFU.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    What the EFF is "All MOUNTAIN"???

  74. #74
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    That MacAskill guy is impressive but I prefer this style:



    (and Chris Akrigg does it brakeles)




    Can you kill that and link to the vimeo version instead? That video automatically plays at full volume. Annoying as fvck.

  75. #75
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    12,211
    Quote Originally Posted by sean salach
    Can you kill that and link to the vimeo version instead? That video automatically plays at full volume. Annoying as fvck.
    Ooooops

    Changed.

    This one seems to behave...

  76. #76
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    6,589
    Thanks! And since i'm back in the thread, I have a good excuse to watch it again.

  77. #77
    Tulsa
    Reputation: rojogonzo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,085
    wherever you go, there you are

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.