Do Cogs Matter that much?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Do Cogs Matter that much?

    Is there that much value/performance added by plunking down big $ for nice cogs vs. a plain ol' Shimano or Profile BMX cog?

    I need some more gear options - am inclined to just get BMX cogs for my not too fancy Bianchi Wuss - just wondering what people's experience is...

  2. #2
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    More expensive cogs might be a bit lighter, or have nifty colors, or be made from an exotic material, or have cool looking graphics, or have "lightening holes" drilled in them, but they don't work any better or last any longer than a good old steel BMX cog.

  3. #3
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    Nothing lasts as long as a Shimano BMX cog...

  4. #4
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    IMO only reason to pay more is if you're running an aluminum freehub body which necessitates a cog with a wide base.

    --sParty
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  5. #5
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    Good point Sparticus. I will admit that I don't recall any of my old bmx bikes having cogs on them. They all had freewheels. Most of them were ACS versions. The only ones that seemed to have a cog if you will were cheap ones with a coaster break.

    Personally, I am a bit of a bike snob so I would be willing to pay some on $30 to make me one and anodize it with a cool color for me. Hell, a shimano freewheel cost me about $16 and my WI freewheel cost me close to $100! But I know I will be getting alot of miles out of the WI. Was it worth that much money??? Probably over kill for my riding but I got a great deal on it when my buddy built my wheels so I said why not. Love the sound it makes though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD
    Good point Sparticus. I will admit that I don't recall any of my old bmx bikes having cogs on them. They all had freewheels. Most of them were ACS versions. The only ones that seemed to have a cog if you will were cheap ones with a coaster break.

    Personally, I am a bit of a bike snob so I would be willing to pay some on $30 to make me one and anodize it with a cool color for me. Hell, a shimano freewheel cost me about $16 and my WI freewheel cost me close to $100! But I know I will be getting alot of miles out of the WI. Was it worth that much money??? Probably over kill for my riding but I got a great deal on it when my buddy built my wheels so I said why not. Love the sound it makes though.
    I like the sound of those WI freewheels, too.

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  7. #7
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    I use "stamped" steel cogs on my single speed specific hubs. On my 9 speed, aluminum hubs, I use Surly cogs due to the wider base.

    I have had zero issues with either of them.

    As Sparty points out, the wider base is a good idea for the aluminum freehubs.

  8. #8
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    most bmx bikes these days use a "cassette hub," which is a bit of a misnomer. it's basically a 110mm hub with a freehub for one cog, or a one-piece freehub/cog with a low tooth count 8t-13t.

    The Odyssey design has been popular for many years.


    it should be easy to find spare cogs for these kind of hubs and i am 99% certain that the 16t cogs that come with the basic-level models worth with Shimano freehubs. most bmx freestyle riders want a microdrive system, so the first upgrade to most bikes is a new hub or driver so they can run a smaller sprocket with a 2.75:1 ratio. that leaves lots of orphan 16t cogs around for mtb'ers to use.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsdoable
    Nothing lasts as long as a Shimano BMX cog...
    I wear through them pretty quickly.
    Gusset / Dimension stamped cogs last a lot longer for some reason.
    Ride more!

  10. #10
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    +1 Sparticus.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoisonDartFrog
    but they don't work any better than a good old steel BMX cog.
    absolutely not true. you may have good luck, but i work at a shop and i come across cogs that look A OK but are straight up egg shape when installed more often then you would imagine.
    anywhere from $6 steel cogs to $30 fancy hole drilled cogs.

    i always suggest to hit up the local guy making cogs in the garage/machine shop becuase everone has one within shippable reach. cnc alloy/steel/ti and remember, support the locals.

  12. #12
    meh... whatever
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    as with most things, you get what you pay for.

    surly ss cogs are virtually indestructible.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by monogod
    as with most things, you get what you pay for.

    surly ss cogs are virtually indestructible.
    ...and asymmetrical for subtle chainline adjustments. Yet another nugget of forward thinking goodness from our friends at Surly.
    Responds to gravity

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    ...and asymmetrical for subtle chainline adjustments. Yet another nugget of forward thinking goodness from our friends at Surly.
    that's has it's annoying downsides too, namely that when you flip the cog to get the other 50% of life out of it the chainline is now off and you have to find resort to other adjustments to make up the difference

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    that's has it's annoying downsides too, namely that when you flip the cog to get the other 50% of life out of it the chainline is now off and you have to find resort to other adjustments to make up the difference
    which is why i make mine symetrical, even though it's much more work to make them that way. Having it flat on one side would be much cheaper to make. But then again, so would having them made in China

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