Did my first fully rigid ride yesterday...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Did my first fully rigid ride yesterday...

    and my last! Putting my shock back on today. The climbing was awesome, thats where I have made the biggest improvement in my riding since going single speed. But the down hills and fast flowing sections sucked. It didn't beat me up too bad, but it threw off my flow. Anybody need a damn near new fancy carbon fork? Going on eBay tonight.

  2. #2
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    I'd recommend you give it more of a chance than that. It requires some different tactics, but you'll learn them with time. Even having started out back in the day on a rigid bike, it took me a month or so to un-learn my bad suspension habits back when I bought the 1x1. Once you find the groove is smooth sailing. I haven't ridden my geared full suspension a tenth as much as the 1x1.

    My $0.02
    Stache 7 --- Rigid Surly 1x1 B+ --- Dirt Drop CrossCheck

  3. #3
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    +1 to that. There is a lot to learn for many people and it doesn't always come quickly. Learning to ride light on the bike and not tense up your arms on downhills makes a huge difference. You will also learn to see the trail differently and know how to pick different lines and flow differently on the trail in a way that suits a rigid bike better

  4. #4
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    I would try an differant handle bar to smooth out the ride or a larger the front tire like a 2.4 or so. I love riding ridge it's kinda of crazy but give it another shot. Are you a 26" or 29er? Alot of people say that ridge 29er is better then 26". I don't know I only have only ridden a ridge 29er.

  5. #5
    singletrack bound
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    I rode ridge back in "86" but now run 80mm on my Jabber.....

    It's a gas......

  6. #6
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    Yes... what they said, and yes, I need a fancy carbon fork.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  7. #7
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    For what it's worth I've ridden rigid, found "the groove" and swapped back after bending the fork. Blown suspension fork and budget have no forced me back onto a rigid, finding the flow again, still missing my suspension.

  8. #8
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    It is not about the destination it is about the journey. Slow down and enjoy the ride,that is what makes single speeding so sweet. The Zen B.S of feeling young again and 1 with the bike. Pick smooth lines grasshopper and hold on.

  9. #9
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    I'm still getting used to riding rigid but have found that it has made me a better rider. I have had to improve my technique rather than relying on my suspension. I also pick better lines. I ride some pretty technical trails and was surprised to find I can go over the same obstacles as the riders with suspension, sometimes I even do better. My arms are a lot stronger also.

  10. #10
    I'm gonna have to kill ya
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    I rode rigid for the first time in 15 years yesterday and it was awesome! I genuinely didn't notice the lack of suspension on 80% of my 30 mile ride the down hills require far more thought and slower pace.

    You do need to change your riding style I switched back into rigid mode surprisingly quickly You need to let the bike float more and shift your body weight accordingly.

    I am runing a White Bro Carbon form and Some Race Face Next SL carbon risers,on smallish 2.1" Rocket Rons and didn't feel any more beaten up at the end of the ride than I do on my 7" AM bike

    Stick with it chap it is a big change and like you have seen already there are great rewards to get from riding rigid

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlespeedbuss
    It is not about the destination it is about the journey. Slow down and enjoy the ride,that is what makes single speeding so sweet. The Zen B.S of feeling young again and 1 with the bike. Pick smooth lines grasshopper and hold on.
    This is the guy to listen to. Yes, I agree, go that way!

    "NOBODY RIDES FOR FREE BUT US"

  12. #12
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    I agree 100% with the sentiment here: Give it a month of 2 or more rides a week, and if you still hate it, then switch back. I rode rigid from the late 70's until around the time Specialized released the FutureShock. I put one on my Ritchey, and really enjoyed it for the Moab-like stuff. I was into going faster, racing a little, etc... After a series of FS bikes over the years, got a 29'er SS Rigid. My other bikes have sat, or been sold. Yesterday at Henry Coe, a couple of the downhills (where I was going a bit too fast anyway) beat me up a bit, but my arms, shoulders and core are stronger from the rigid SS, so it was not that bad. Fat rubber with moderate air pressure, medium-soft grips that FIT YOUR HANDS and picking a line will do wonders. And riding rigid will make you pick better lines, so if you do race with a fork or FS you'll be even better off, IMO.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


  13. #13
    pedal me happy
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    I rode my first ss and rigid ride today it sure puts you in touch with the bike more. The
    climbing and smooth sections are amazing. I am running a carbon fork and it just takes
    the sharp edge off and the thing steers like nothing else I've been on. Coming back down
    on a rough trail was a little rough on the hands partly because I had a hard time seeing
    because of the snow and glasses fogging up. I'm having fun so far with it just wish winter
    wasn't on it's way.

  14. #14
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    I too am just beginning a full rigid journey.....first few rides were definitely different but I'm diggin it now! I've become a sharper, more in tune rider I believe...maybe not as fast on the rooty, rocky sections and such yet but the fact that I'm more accute to the trail makes up for it. So for the OP, don't let your first and only rigid ride change your mind!

    Just out of curiosity, how many people considered putting their susp. fork back on after their first rigid ride but didn't and now wouldn't go back??

    This guy did!

  15. #15
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    I just rode my Cannondale Rush yesterday. I loved being seated as I pounded into roots and undulations while even the suspended fork HT guys were out of the saddle.

    Long climbs in the saddle was a mixed bag. But then I rediscovered the granny ring! Wahoo!!!

    But one thing I didn't consider is the reduced feel and brake modulation the suspension fork has. My braking could have been better given the forks compliance.

    I really enjoy my rigid 29-er. It allows me to place my front wheel where ever I want. I can pick lines and lift the front tire as much or as little and place it where I need to.

    I can do that with my FS, but it's not as precise.

    You really do have to give it time. You need time to adjust to the fork and adopt a different riding style.

    So got any pix of this carbon fork?
    Just get out and ride!

  16. #16
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    Suspension on a single speed is just flat out wrong. It goes against all the minimalist, simplified goodness of single speeding.

    But if you insist on wussing out, I'll give you $25 for that fancy carbon fork.

  17. #17
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by graluc
    and my last! Putting my shock back on today. The climbing was awesome, thats where I have made the biggest improvement in my riding since going single speed. But the down hills and fast flowing sections sucked. It didn't beat me up too bad, but it threw off my flow. Anybody need a damn near new fancy carbon fork? Going on eBay tonight.
    STOP! Hold off on selling the fork!

    I have two rigid single speed bikes and a third with a 100mm shock; I would not give up any of them (of course I have trouble getting rid of any of my bikes regardless, but I digress). I recently added 650b tires to my rigid SASS and it was a blast (but just to be sure I going to ride the sh!t out of it). But at some point I get tired of a rigid fork beating me up, I switch to my softtail. I saw getoverit; sometimes you just got to go fast!

    OTHO, If you don't have the funds for 2 bikes, I would advise you to pick up an extra fork crown race; then you can easily switch back and forth between your shock and fork.

    As long as you have a chain connecting a single chainring to a single cog your riding a certified singlespeed; after that it's just style..
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  18. #18
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    It's not for everybody.

    For me I like to pick and chose the bike based on the trail. In my opinion, there are trails more suited for my rigid SS and others that are suited for my geared full suspension bikes.

    If you didn't like it, sell the fork, but I'd give it another try on a different trail.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

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