Damm this Gets Expensive Quick- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Damm this Gets Expensive Quick

    I have gotten the single speed bug and am looking to upgrade. I like the idea of getting a titanium bike because of the ride quality and the longevity (as opposed to carbon or scadium). Looking at the Vassago Optimus Ti ($1995), with a Fox 29 fork ($570) and Industry Nine 29'er Cross Country whee1set ($1030). That puts me at $3600 and I don't even have brakes, headset, handle bar, stem, a drive train or a place to sit. I thinking if I keep going down this road I am going to wind up around $6k, which seems insane to me. Is there a better way to do this? Should I just go with a complete bike?

  2. #2
    AZ
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    You can scale back your needs ie: steel frame , rigid fork , different wheel set etc. Or look for a deal on a complete bike or perhaps a used bike . Whatever suits your needs .
    Last edited by AZ; 11-02-2009 at 02:01 PM.

  3. #3
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    You chose a thousand dollar wheel set, and act surprised that the whole bike's going to cost $6k?

    I buy $200 wheelsets and end up with about $1200 in a bike, so the ratio proves out anyway, 6x wheel cost gives you bike cost. Call it Bob's law of bike pricing

    I see some people still think conspicuous consumption is the way to go.
    Chasing bears through the woods drunk with a dull hatchet is strongly not advised

  4. #4
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    I would go jabberwocky. 25% of the price, 100% of the fun!
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  5. #5
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    Compromise (I dare you). You might be able to get a custom build package with some built in discount from the right shop if you buy everything from them, but with those kind of parts its simply never going to be cheap

    Good steel should last forever too, and you can prevent pretty much all rust with the right, simple precautions. Even the nearly top of the line DT240s coupled with Stan's rims would be a few hundred $$ cheaper than those I9's too. I wouldn't compromise on the Fox though... those are awesome and $570 is a great price too

  6. #6
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    You're telling me it's expensive!

    I just spent over $100 converting mine (including a new Surly 1X1 steel fork) and my wife is furious.

  7. #7
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    I probably like the bike you have now better.

  8. #8
    Birdman aka JMJ
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    Is there a better way to do this?

    Yes - spend less! And you're complaining about money you haven't even spent yet.

    I put my rigid ti SS together for about $1200 - Litespeed ti frame, Spicer ti fork, Race Face/White Industries/Mavic /Syncros components. About 20lbs. Not the newest or the best, but I pass plenty of guys on more expensive rigs. Plus, I'd rather ride my bike than sit in the parking lot and talk about it.

    I'm with wv_bob on this one.

    JMJ

  9. #9
    fresh fish in stock...... SuperModerator
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    meh.....i just ordered a custom steel rig that'll be rolling on i9's...putting $$ into your passion is not necessarily bad.....

    if you can afford it cool .....if it's gonna put you in debt you may wanna rethink the whole thing....
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  10. #10
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    Seriously get a Jabberwocky. I ride one fully rigid, and I love it.
    :wq

  11. #11
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    ...or get a chinese custom Ti frame for $690 to your door. BB7 brakes are fantastic, fairly light wheels from BWW, Aerozine SS crank from Crazy8 with a Ti chainring, and you are almost there...

    Johnnydrz

  12. #12
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    I built my SS out of my old hardtail and inexpensive parts I got on a deal, or already had. One thing I find fun about it is finding the deals and keeping it inexpensive! Its easy to cut a check or swipe a card to get the bestest of everything, but it takes timing, patience, and some luck to find what you want on the cheap and building it over time!

    To me modifying the bike over time is part of the fun!

  13. #13
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    Man... it can be, if you seek approval. :-) Thats why I roll an $899 msrp complete Flight. It rides great, has a lifetime warranty, and did I say it makes me smile? Is it superlight? no... is it bling? no... but its mine... and its fun! I will replace hubs, and other items as they wear out..not with anything stellar, but functional and dependable. I gotta tell ya..I ride the hell out of my Flight.. I cant imagine how pissed I would get, after ruining a high dollar wheelset. One good taco. . . and the cursing would ensue.
    The only regrets in life, are the risks you didn't take.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mo0se
    I cant imagine how pissed I would get, after ruining a high dollar wheelset. One good taco. . . and the cursing would ensue.
    Good point. I curse pretty loud when I ruin an inexpensive wheelset - nevermind something 4x the cost. Actually, I am probably not cutout for the high $$ wheelset as I would never be willing to save it for racing and I would totally lose it if it got trashed. I have got to go tubeless though. Right now I am running 40+ lbs to avoid pinch flat and it feels like I am bouncing off every rock I hit.

  15. #15
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    surly 1x1 frame- 250$ from speedgoat
    used fox vanilla 125 fork off CL 120$
    FSA Pig h-set: 25$
    FSA dh seatpost: 30$
    Grimeca System 12's: 260$ (bought new way back when, still running perfectly)
    profile 6 speed hub, atomlab DHR rim rear wheel: 200$ (incl. build cost)
    crossmax xl front wheel: 140$ off CL
    saint cranks w red e-13 supercharger: 110$ off CL
    syncros mental pedals: 60$ off pinkbike
    .243 dj seat: 20$ in deal bin at bike show
    titec hellbent handlebars (came in a trade which netted me a frame, a fork, bars/stem/drivetrain for my old SID fork)
    race face SYStem: 45$ take-off bought in the 90's.
    Michelin HotS tires: only paid for one of them: think 40$ off CL
    Ourys: 15$
    Misfit cod cog in back and blackspire ring up front: about 60$
    Tubes n lubes: who knows?! let's say 15$.

    Total cost so far: an exorbitant 1300$.
    Except for the frame, that's all Canadian dollars (which back when most parts were assembled were worth considerably less than they are now!)

    You could build this bike for under a grand US I'm sure.
    Especially if you skip the expensive hydros and go for bb7's which're WAY easier to work with!
    and profile/crossmax wheels? saint cranks with red plastic 'guard? pretty bling bits for not a lot of cash.

    you don't want to know how much my heckler cost me, I think I may've spent like a whole 400$ Canadian on the 36 Talas RC2...
    seriously high dollar stuff!!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  16. #16
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    Huh. I thought I heard that one of the benefits of SS is that it's cheaper. Now I know the other side of the story. Thanks!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    Huh. I thought I heard that one of the benefits of SS is that it's cheaper. Now I know the other side of the story. Thanks!
    It is cheaper for people that want it to be cheaper. New SS bikes are generally cheaper, and the parts you wear out are fewer and cheaper to replace. But upgrades can be the death of any budget

  18. #18
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    Steel is real.................ly ****ing cheaper.

    But yeah it can get expensive but it gets you out there in the woods, ripping singletrack!

  19. #19
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    niner sir9 with carbon fork - $1000
    xt cranks - $250
    Thomson stem and seatpost - $175
    Crank Bros pedals - $60
    BB7's $100
    Wheel set - $650 - stans flows with hadly hubs - colorado cycle

    I think I was around $1600 for everything - bike is absolutely incredible. Coming off a rigid karate monkey it is night and day different in a good way. $6K is crazy. I would put my SS against another bike anyday and for the money it would be hard to beat.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by shomes
    niner sir9 with carbon fork - $1000
    xt cranks - $250
    Thomson stem and seatpost - $175
    Crank Bros pedals - $60
    BB7's $100
    Wheel set - $650 - stans flows with hadly hubs - colorado cycle

    I think I was around $1600 for everything - bike is absolutely incredible. Coming off a rigid karate monkey it is night and day different in a good way. $6K is crazy. I would put my SS against another bike anyday and for the money it would be hard to beat.
    I'm adding up the numbers here, and I get $2235?? Your also going to need tires, chain, headset, handlebar and grips.....etc. Just because it's a ss doesn't mean it's going to be cheap.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by UserNameTaken
    IThat puts me at $3600 and I don't even have brakes, headset, handle bar, stem, a drive train or a place to sit. I thinking if I keep going down this road I am going to wind up around $6k, which seems insane to me. Is there a better way to do this? Should I just go with a complete bike?
    What kind of brakes, headset, bar/stem, and cranks were you going to get for $2400???

    It's easy to get outta hand when parting up a bike, that's for sure. Here's my advice - spend the money to get the right frame/fork/rear hub/wheel, and let the rest be cost conscious. You can nab a custom Gunnar Ruffian for $1350 or so. A custom steel frame made just for you will ride better than a 'some sizes fit most' production frame. Plus, the Gunnar is made right here stateside! Pair it with a Vicious fork (also made in USA, and buttery smooth) and you've got a custom frame and fork for less than your budget Ti frame. Throw a Hadley SS hub on the rear with your rim of choice, and as long as you've got cushy Oury grips, does the rest really even matter?
    RIDE HARD, live easy.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PutAwayWet
    What kind of brakes, headset, bar/stem, and cranks were you going to get for $2400???
    Didn't do the numbers on those part. I had just started to try and put together a bike that would be light and had quality parts. Once you buy one really nice component it seems a waste to buy something of lesser quality to go with it. For me it was a pretty quick slippery slope. I actually more amused by the psychology of the whole thing and was never intending to go forward with actually building a $6K single speed. I don't want to be more worried about my bike when I crash than whether I am going to break a collar bone.

  23. #23
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    Wow that is silly. A really, really nice bike would be a Siren John Henry, and contact Mikesee about White Industries hubs laced to Arches or Flows, ok, so already at about $1650 or so. Go with a rigid fork...even with a Waltworks one you are still under 2k so far, so buy a couple tires or something with the leftover money. Shop for the rest over the winter sales looking for value not the ultimate, and you will have a hot blinglespeed for a little over the price of your original frame/fork idea, if you can't come in under $3k you are not trying. $2000 is the price of two or three frames.

  24. #24
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    My guess is to get a more affordable wheel set than the Industry 9. And yeah,, I believe there are other good frames that are cheaper than what you have chosen too.

    But again, if you like it and have the finances to do it, by all means.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    Huh. I thought I heard that one of the benefits of SS is that it's cheaper. Now I know the other side of the story. Thanks!
    Its kinda of more of one thing and less of the other. We decide that we're not going to blow our budget on derailleurs and shifters so that opens up fundage for nicer wheels, forks, brakes, or cranks.

    I know I'm not alone in the fact that I'd rather own my single speed that is built with mid-to-high end parts instead of a comparably priced geared bike with a lower end fork and bottom end shifters, cranks, and derailleurs.

  26. #26
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    "I want, I want, I want" You sound like a child.

    You're only getting rid of maybe $300 worth of parts with a single speed.

    Did you think a Ti frame with high end parts would be cheap, just because there is no derailleurs?

    You can get a good bike for $800 or a really f*#king amazing bike for $7-8000+. Pick any number you want. No one really gives a s*#t except a few boring old men on the internet with no sex lives and high levels of discretionary household expendiature.

    Pick a number between $800 and $7-8000. What are you happy to spend? You can have a nice bike for any number in between. If you are racing you might save a *few* seconds if you get a bike with a big price tag. Most people on this forum are old men who like to ride over the same set of rocks for half an hour and post videos of it on the internet. If you fall into this latter group you have even less need for a $7-8000 bike than a die hard racer.

    The bike should not make you happy, the riding should. If you think a new bike will make you a happier rider for more than a month, you are wrong. If you think that expensive equiptment will make you substantially faster then you should get into motor racing or something instead. If your partner is angry at you for spending lots of money on a bike, maybe you should take that money, buy a bottle of viagra and two aeroplance ticket to a tropical island.

    Alloy frames are not uncomfortable, despite all the hype and verbiage on this forum and in the marketing materials. I would rather ride a well made, well set up alloy bike than a hastily slapped together steel or titanium one. Steel is not a short term investment. If you bother to take 10 mins every 3-6 months to put some frame saver in the thing, and don't leave it in the rain for a month, the bike will last you at least a decade. Judging by your attitude a frame in either material will last longer than your desire to upgrade. My $1100 (USD equivalent) bike has been ridden over 20,000km in 2 years. It is steel and there is no reason it shouldn't last another 5 years or more.

    You can get a complete bike like a karate monkey for less than $1000 if you look. Or, as you point out, you can spend $6000+. Spend what you want to and stop talking about it because no one really cares that much.

    It isn't that hard.

    Grow up.

  27. #27
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    If I wanted a bike like that, I'd definitely get it used. Seems like it isn't hard to find high end bikes that that have barely been used for a fraction of what it would cost to build yourself. Even if you change out a couple parts you don't like, it will be a lot cheaper.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    ...No one really gives a s*#t except a few boring old men on the internet with no sex lives and high levels of discretionary household expendiature....
    HEY!....my sex life is fine and dandy thankyouverymuch.....bish...
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  29. #29
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    Wow, I have built 2 SS bikes now for the total price of...... $320..... for both and I thought I was overboard at times.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by UserNameTaken
    I have gotten the single speed bug and am looking to upgrade. I like the idea of getting a titanium bike because of the ride quality and the longevity (as opposed to carbon or scadium). Looking at the Vassago Optimus Ti ($1995), with a Fox 29 fork ($570) and Industry Nine 29'er Cross Country whee1set ($1030). That puts me at $3600 and I don't even have brakes, headset, handle bar, stem, a drive train or a place to sit. I thinking if I keep going down this road I am going to wind up around $6k, which seems insane to me. Is there a better way to do this? Should I just go with a complete bike?
    I started exactly where you are. I scaled back.

    I went Jabberwocky with ODIS. Later, I will probably upgrade to Ti and suspension fork ... maybe even the option to add gears sometimes.

  31. #31
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    The answer is: Yes, just get a complete bike.

    You can always swap out components you don't like.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    "
    You're only getting rid of maybe $300 worth of parts with a single speed.
    Not if you are going super-blingy - go check the price on the new SRAM XX parts. The cassette alone is more than $300!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor29
    Not if you are going super-blingy - go check the price on the new SRAM XX parts. The cassette alone is more than $300!
    why would you put a cassette on a blinglespeed? ....silly rabbit
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM
    why would you put a cassette on a blinglespeed? ....silly rabbit
    I don't think you understood his post. The original claim was that a SS bike only saves maybe $300 over a similar level geared bike, but Thor29 was correctly pointing out that as you up the chain of higher end parts the difference can actually be larger because of the cost of X.0, XTR, and XX

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I don't think you understood his post. The original claim was that a SS bike only saves maybe $300 over a similar level geared bike, but Thor29 was correctly pointing out that as you up the chain of higher end parts the difference can actually be larger because of the cost of X.0, XTR, and XX
    [HANDHITSFOREHEAD] d'oh! [/HANDHITSFOREHEAD]
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by C Dunlop
    "I want, I want, I want" You sound like a child.

    (middle of moderately long blog post omitted)

    Spend what you want to and stop talking about it because no one really cares that much.

    It isn't that hard.

    Grow up.
    I don't know seems like people care about this type of issue given the number of posts- and it has made for an interesting discussion.

    I love to ride- that is what bikes are about for me. But, I have found after owning a number of bikes over the last 20 years that there is a reason why quality cost $$. High end bikes have a nice feel. They are quick and responsive. The parts do what they are supposed to do and do it well.

    I will admit that wanting anything for pleasure that cost that much is a bit silly and immature. How about we meet half way - I will do my best to try and grow up and you can work on not being such an angry d**khead. Sound good?

  37. #37
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    I thought about a MOOTs Ti for a little while - until I saw the $$$. You can buy three frames for the price of a Ti; so ditch that idea and get a Steel or Al frame. Go mid-high level on the components; and you can get a great build for $2300 with not too much compromise and not for too much over the price of the Ti frame alone.

    And put your hobby in prospective. My brother races cars as his past time; if he blows a right front end, he is out $500 for repairs. That does not even include his drive time, gas, oil...or major repairs

    You probably will not see the performance gains for a $6000 bike (and if you are sweating the cost, you could probably do without) but I assume most people who drive a $100K sports car will not even come close to what those cars are capable of performing. So $2300 for a couple of season of fun ain't that bad. Go for it and enjoy the build

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by CHUM
    [HANDHITSFOREHEAD] d'oh! [/HANDHITSFOREHEAD]
    Here, save this!

    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  39. #39
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    will probably upgrade to Ti and suspension fork
    Sorry, suspension fork is not an upgrade...

    Hey, good parts will give you a nice ride. I think the sweet spot is 3K, but you can go up or down from there. Niner frame + carbon fork = $1,000, i9 SS set = $900 (yep, that's what I paid for both). Now, you got left $1,100 to play with. That's a lot of dough...

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by wv_bob
    You chose a thousand dollar wheel set, and act surprised that the whole bike's going to cost $6k?

    I buy $200 wheelsets and end up with about $1200 in a bike, so the ratio proves out anyway, 6x wheel cost gives you bike cost. Call it Bob's law of bike pricing

    I see some people still think conspicuous consumption is the way to go.

    wow that worked for me. I spend about 300 in wheels and then the full bike ran right around 1,800.

  41. #41
    Ride, Sleep, Work
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    I bought my SS for cheap and it works great.
    GT SS Peace 26er for 450.00 for complete bike
    Marzocchi Marathon SL 2003 75.00
    Deore Hydro brakes 30.00
    Sold cable brakes -25.00
    Bought Kenda tires 30.00
    Seat post 15.00

    I have 575.00 in the bike so far adn I have 6 races in the bag with 5 wins and one 2nd place. SS does not have to cost you every thing you own.
    Click to save 15% off your 1st Hammer nutrition order
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  42. #42
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    I'm in the same situation as Usernametaken. I have a Motobecane Outcast that I have thoroughly enjoyed, but after a year of hard riding and racing the hubs and bottom bracket are shot. It's not really an upgrade-able bike either, so I'm looking to upgrade to a sweet new race capable ride.

    Single speed 29'ers being more of a niche, finding or building a sweet ride in a reasonable budget is more of a challenge. The used higher end market is really thin in this category, which forces you towards new so-so bikes in the middle range, or full$$$ for a higher end ride. But winter is upon us, and I'm hoping my patience and scouring the market will net me my ideal bike by sometime next spring.

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