Cross bike spacing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cross bike spacing

    I am about to pull the trigger on a SS cross bike. I have a couple questions for da boys.
    1. Should I space 130 or 135?
    Looks like if I space 130 and use the Surly cog or another type cog system I could
    use my Dura Ace hubs and would have a multitude of wheels to choose from. Do the
    cogs work as well as a single freewheel? I have at least 6 sets of 130 mm wheels.
    If I space 135 I would have King, WTB,Paul, or Phil Wood single hubs to choose from
    but would need to get a training rim and a tubular race wheel built up.

    2. I would think if I spaced 135 I would need to use mtb cranks and spaced 130 road? I
    plan to use 1 or two chainring guards.

    You folks have any thoughts on this? I searched and found Sparty's witch thread and a couple others, but not exactly what I wanted to know.

  2. #2
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    Most CX frames are 130mm. But, if you use 135mm you can use mtb hubs and then you have a set of wheels in case you ever want to build up a 29" SS. As far as the crank, I've used road cranks on several MTB frames, so chances are you could use either type on a 135mm spaced Cx frame. Is this a custom built frame?

  3. #3
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    Depends on the frame. A lot of steel cross frames are spaced at 132.5 and you can run whatever hubs you want without respacing anything. Aluminum and carbon frames will be spaced at either 130 or 135, and require that dimension hub. What frame are you getting?

  4. #4
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    135 for stronger wheel, 135 for better ring to large cog alignment, 135 for disc brake options.

  5. #5
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    I'd go with 130.

    Wheel strength has nothing to do with drop-outspacing. It is determined by flange dimensions. I don't really see an epidemic of taco'd rear wheels on geared or SS bikes at races. As such, I don't see any reason to prioritize this factor.

    A wheel built with CX racing and training in mind will be be poorly suited for a 29er mountain bike and vice-versa. I don't see any reason to build your CX wheels with 29er cross compatilibity in mind.

    You don't even need one chainguard for SS, much less two.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeanutButterBreath
    I'd go with 130.

    Wheel strength has nothing to do with drop-outspacing. It is determined by flange dimensions. I don't really see an epidemic of taco'd rear wheels on geared or SS bikes at races. As such, I don't see any reason to prioritize this factor.
    Often 135 hubs have wider flange spacing than 130. This does increase the left to right spoke triangulation. But you’re right, there is no epidemic of taco’d rear CX wheels. But, then again, 130 was made standard back when we had 7 cogs on the rear, not 9 or 10. Also, there is a great selection of high end, light weight MTB hubs on the market, including 135mm single speed hubs. I can’t think of any reason not to go 135 unless you want to use a pre-built road wheel right out of the box.

  7. #7
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    Some manufacturers change spacing, some don't. You also have to compare the flange diameters.

    Since OP has 6 sets of road wheels to choose from and plans on racing tubulars, I think 130 is a better option. Tubular wheelsets already go for cheap on eBay. With road tubeless right around the corner the supply of cheap, lightly used, high-end tubulars wheelsets will likely increase. None of these will be 135mm spaced.

  8. #8
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    A steel 132.5 spaced frame, such as a cross check, has infinate possibilities. Run 130 road wheels for race+training, or 135 mtb, the cross check has enough clearance to run wide rubber,and you have a sweet machine for ripping mellow trails. 135 disk hubs also have the opportunity to step into the world of fixed riding, both on and off road. There are other frames with the middle spacing, but i am only familiar with the cross check.

  9. #9
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    I am going to talk to several builders at the Portland show and decide. Lots of nice builders out there. Thanks for the ideas on the spacing.

    No do we think the Surly cog setup or ones like it on a xtr or dura ace hub work as well as a single speed freewheel on a single speed specific hub?

  10. #10
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    Quick question!

    I am interested in the Surly Crosscheck frame, but how well does the ss set-up work? From looking at the dropouts I would think that the rear wheel would pull out! Does anyone have any experience with this frame/bike?

    Thanks,

    Nick

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by G-man
    . . .do we think the Surly cog setup or ones like it on a xtr or dura ace hub work as well as a single speed freewheel on a single speed specific hub?
    I am running a ENO (non ecc.) hub with an ENO FW on my main race wheelset, and a Spot Ti cog W/ Gusset spacer kit on a DA 8 speed hub on my back-up set. Both work fine.

  12. #12
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    Works fine with a properly secured hub (bolt on). Some even get away with steel QRs, though I wouldn't risk a race result on that set-up.

  13. #13
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    Thanks!

  14. #14
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    Yes, to Surly cogs

    Quote Originally Posted by G-man
    I am going to talk to several builders at the Portland show and decide. Lots of nice builders out there. Thanks for the ideas on the spacing.

    No do we think the Surly cog setup or ones like it on a xtr or dura ace hub work as well as a single speed freewheel on a single speed specific hub?
    Check out Joesph Ahearne Cycles while at the show. He designs your head tube badge based on you, the rider. I liked his split chain stays on a few of his bikes. Great looking brazing work. Someday I'll own one!

    I've run the Surly cogs and they are tough. Definately worth it!

    HTH,
    L8
    Let us Ride!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by l84biking
    I've run the Surly cogs and they are tough. Definately worth it!
    Tough but gratuitously heavy, IMO.

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