This crashing is getting expensive- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Retro Grouch
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    This crashing is getting expensive

    Well, I did my first ride since breaking ribs and puncturing a lung 3 weeks ago. The ride up to Sandpoint is a relatively smooth dirt road that climbs about 1000 feet over 10 miles. While being a little cold, I found the ribs were relatively tolerable on the climb up, but once I turned around, the downhill was murder. I also discovered my new helmet, bought about 3-4 months ago is toast from the crash. I haven't got the medical bills yet, but I'm thinking even with my insurance, two days in the hospital is going to be pricey. I guess as I get older, I'm going to have to factor in medical bills as part of my riding experience. So it goes.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  2. #2
    Out spokin'
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    Just accept one of the many credit card offers you receive via snail mail each month and start chargin', bro. Leave your kids with a negative estate... meanwhile you'll be doing your part to stimulate the economy. It's the American way.

    --sParty

    P.S. Hey Brad, let's do the Cream Puff again in '11. We miss ya up thisaway... and besides, you've got all that time to train... and crash...
    disciplesofdirt.org

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  3. #3
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    Just accept one of the many credit card offers you receive via snail mail each month and start chargin', bro. Leave your kids with a negative estate... meanwhile you'll be doing your part to stimulate the economy. It's the American way.

    --sParty

    P.S. Hey Brad, let's do the Cream Puff again in '11. We miss ya up thisaway... and besides, you've got all that time to train... and crash...
    The Cream Puff is my goal. Probably not 11, but I'm looking at 12.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  4. #4
    master blaster
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    ive gone through a helmeteach month for the last two month ad about 5 grand in medical bills.

    your lucky

  5. #5
    Did I catch a niner+?
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    I started looking at better insurance plans through my work, I upgrade as soon as I could. The big accident which got my a ti plate in my arm was a doosey and I didnt even spend a day in a hospital.
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  6. #6
    WNC Native
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    Glad I have insurance, as my August crash would have been excess of 50 grand.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  7. #7
    4 Niners
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    I wear this every time I ride unless it is a relatively easy course (a green course). At my age (56), it takes too long to recover from injuries. I have had some horrific crashes in this and never been injured. It even lets you do stuff you would not normally attempt since you know when you fall, there will be no injury.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...8.aspx?sc=FRGL

    I ride nasty stuff and take big chances, but so far have never been hurt. I also wear knee protection but not shin protection and my shins are very scared but I have not found shin protection that is comfortable and even though I have nasty bruises on my shins at almost all times, they are not the kind of injuries that disable me.

    Right now I have a 2" long scab on my right shin from a very steep rocky downhill that I normally fly down on my full rigid SS but this one time about 2 weeks ago, I hit a rock (one of many rocks and big roots) and it torqued my steering enough that I ran into the right side "wall" of this narrow downhill section with my shin providing the stopping power..

    Anyway, I hope you are recovering well and I recommend body armor for us old guys because, getting injured can detract from our riding time. I actually know 2 guys that are around 30 that quit riding MTB because of injuries that required multiple surgeries. These injuries would almost certainly have been prevented by body armor (rotator cuff and forearm).

    As an additional side note, almost nobody would ride MTB without a helmet and I have basically broken 2 helmets in half on MTB's with no injury to myself other than possibly the lowest level of concussion or maybe just a mild head deceleration.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by yourdaguy
    I wear this every time I ride unless it is a relatively easy course (a green course). At my age (56), it takes too long to recover from injuries. I have had some horrific crashes in this and never been injured. It even lets you do stuff you would not normally attempt since you know when you fall, there will be no injury.
    Sorry, but you HOPE that when you fall there will be no injury
    Seriously, I've thought (briefly) about the idea of getting something like that but I just can't imagine being out in the mountains on a nice summer's day wearing all that stuff. Maybe ok for trail centres with (uplift facilities) I suppose, but I can't imagine slogging uphill for a couple of hours with it on.
    Anyway (Sod's law being what it is) it's often the "easy" stuff that catches us out, when we're least expecting it........

  9. #9
    4 Niners
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    Yes, we all hope when we fall there will be no injury, but wearing armor decreases my chances about 300 %. Yes it is hot in the Summer but not as hot as you think. It is synthetic mesh with lightweight plastic armor. I wear it for my shirt and it goes in the washing machine after every ride just like a shirt would. Being hotter in the Summer means you have to drink more water and actually gets you in better shape than not being hot. All the trails I ride are in the woods and we don't have the long hills around here. We have lots of really steep fairly short hills and occasionally a series of these with no down in between with total net climbing of only around 200-300 feet before starting back down.

    To give you an idea, there is only one ski slope within 400 miles and it is only 300 feet of drop. We have stuff so steep you can barely walk up it but it doesn't last long. So around here, I get the cooling downhill blast within a few minutes every time.

  10. #10
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    aka brad...i feel ya

    i've spent all my riding life in baggies & t-shirts. lotsa bumps, bruises, scrapes & shallow holes in my body, but never a bad injury. yeah, i am not too aggressive, just out for some fun, exercise & communing with nature. but my luck ran out the beginning of october. went otb onto solid rocks & busted up my hip & thigh pretty good.

    sat down for 3 weeks & when i went out again wore protection (on my hips naturally) for the 1st time in my life. guess what? maybe it was cuz i was riding too carefully but on a pretty simple dirt stretch i did it again, managed to land right on the only rock in sight & this time broke a couple ribs.

    i am getting up in years now, have decided to take the docs advice so am not going near any trails until this heals completely. aka brad, i can't see how you were able to ride up & downhill. i didn't puncture a lung, am only riding on flat pavement & it hurts like hell.

    now i have to figure out what to wear when i get back on my mtb. i can't see me in body armor like yourdaguy (its hot here all year round) but i can't take another big hit, physically or financially either...

    what to do???

  11. #11
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    Obviously it works for you and I wasn't knocking the idea anyway - I can see that you'll find it less of a hindrance than maybe I and others would, with your riding consisting of short sharp climbs and descents rather than anything sustained.

    The fact is, of course, that doing anything like we do brings with it an increased risk of injury and what is also a fact is that the older we get the longer it takes us to recover.
    During my last trip to A&E (two A/C separations in the one crash ) I was told by a very large and stern nurse/dominatrix that "at your age it's time you gave up doing all this stupid stuff and took up a more gentle pursuit more suitable for your age, like bowls". Bowls FFS - I'm only 58, not 88

    My reply (through gritted teeth, 'cos I was hurting like f*ck) was something along the lines of "What a load of cock that is....".
    I can't imagine not getting out riding bikes, I can't think of anything that would come near to replacing it.

  12. #12
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy R
    ... "at your age it's time you gave up doing all this stupid stuff and took up a more gentle pursuit more suitable for your age, like bowls". Bowls FFS - I'm only 58, not 88

    My reply (through gritted teeth, 'cos I was hurting like f*ck) was something along the lines of "What a load of cock that is....".
    ...
    What are bowls?

    --sParty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  13. #13
    4 Niners
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    Yea I had an orthopedic surgeon tell me 10 years ago when I was 46 to give up water skiing because I have a spur on my right elbow from being a pitcher when I was a kid. (can't quite straighten my right arm all the way out and water skiing forces it straight). We know him socially and see him at parties and stuff and he has probably gained 40-50 lbs in those 10 years. I still weigh the same and still waterski. Just changed my grip a little to accommodate my elbow problem.

    I totally share your philosophy for life.

  14. #14
    Retro Grouch
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    I had not even thought about protective gear, but I'm warming to the idea. The only other choice is riding less technical trails, like that is going to happen (my wife snickered when I offered it up as an idea). So I looked around and found <a href="http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/PG267A15-Troy+Lee+Designs+Bp5850hw+Protect.aspx"> these </a>Troy Design protectors. Does anyone one have any experience with this stuff. I don't jump off cliffs or anything, just steep technical trails.
    Last edited by aka brad; 11-13-2010 at 10:37 AM.
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  15. #15
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    Troy Lee Designs is generally some of the best available in my opinion. Everything of his I have every bought I liked.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    What are bowls?

    --sParty
    you know, for medicinal purposes. It doesn't have to be a bowl, pipes apparently work too

  17. #17
    Retro Grouch
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    What are bowls?

    --sParty
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowls; same as lawn bowling.

    "Bowls is popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa, Hong Kong and parts of the United States. It is also gaining momentum in Japan. Because of its competitiveness, skill and the fact that it is a non-contact sport, the game suits people from teen years through to their nineties. However, there is a considerable professional competition with many younger men and women playing. Since the early 2000s, the sport has developed in Denmark as well. The World Championships held in the UK annually is a 100,000 competition and is watched by 3 million viewers via BBC TV"
    Just one more rep and I get the toaster!

  18. #18
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