Converting to SS...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
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    Converting to SS...

    Got some gearing questions....

    I am turning my Commuter/Baby Hauling bikes into a SS and need to now what size cog to go in back. I am going to use a 46T up front.

    This bike is used strickly on the road for commuting and hauling my little girl around. I live in FLAT Florida so no hills to worry about.

    I already have the 46T (Downhill single ring) because I am running 1 x 8 with a 11-28 in back.

    So what size cog in back? I have strong legs and wnat something in between grinding the gears and a light spin. Should I just stick with a 44T up front?

    18, 20 or 21T in back??

    Thanks for any advice.....
    DIRT BOY
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  2. #2
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    Typically, most people I ride with run a 2:1 ratio like 32:16 or 34:17 for trails. The ratio allows for a comfortable speed on flats and enough torque to climb most offroad sections. Sometimes people will run a 32:20 to make it a little easier on the climbs (or a similar variation).

    If you're riding mostly flats and want a little more speed, then I'd opt for something in the 40:20 range or thereabouts. 42:20 or 44:20 should be fine too for flat areas. The smaller your rear cog gets, the more torque you create. The larger your front ring gets, the more torque you create. To put it simply, the greater the difference between the tooth sizes on the front ring and rear cog, the greater the torque, ergo the more speed you'll generate.

    IMO, I wouldn't run anything under a 16 in the back or you risk dropping your chain, especially if you're running a large ring up front. You can also play with your crankarm length to make the spinning easier or harder (longer crankarm = more leverage on the front ring).

    Let us know what you decide.

  3. #3
    giddy up!
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkymutt
    Typically, most people I ride with run a 2:1 ratio like 32:16 or 34:17 for trails. The ratio allows for a comfortable speed on flats and enough torque to climb most offroad sections. Sometimes people will run a 32:20 to make it a little easier on the climbs (or a similar variation).

    If you're riding mostly flats and want a little more speed, then I'd opt for something in the 40:20 range or thereabouts. 42:20 or 44:20 should be fine too for flat areas. .
    40:20 is still 2:1. It'll have exactly the same gear inches.

    I'd recommend a 42:16. That's what I use on my fixed gear and my town cruiser.

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  4. #4
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    Me no good at math...

    Can't believe I overlooked that. Must be late. 42:16 is a great ratio.

  5. #5
    College
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    Quote Originally Posted by stinkymutt
    Can't believe I overlooked that. Must be late. 42:16 is a great ratio.
    You're not very good at english either =P

    "me no good at math"
    College boy

  6. #6
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Who cares about your ratio? What we really want to know is this thing going to weigh less than a dozen pounds?
    Last edited by Drevil; 01-13-2006 at 04:09 AM.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    Double dog dare

    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    Who cares about your ratio? What we really want to know is this thing going to weigh less than a dozen pounds?
    We wanna see a 4150g commuter/babyhauler.

  8. #8
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    i run 44x17 on my crosscheck and 46x18 on my paramonut fixie. and can still climb pretty good.

    if i was in hill-less so. fla. i'd bump up to a 46x16 maybe? actually with 26" wheels maybe even bigger.

  9. #9
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
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    Lmao!

    Sorry, but htis beast is around 27.5lbs
    I need it to be on the cheaper side to make sure it's I can lock it up an not worry about it.

    Things that changed since I took the picture:

    • FSA Gama MegaExo 44/32/22, now just a FSA 46T up front.
    • Schwalbe Supermoto 2.35 tires
    • 11-28 from 12-32
    • FSA seatpost from a nasbar for more setback.
    I am going to go with a Steel Rigid fork next month!
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    DIRT BOY
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  10. #10
    The devil is an angel too
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    Well, since you have a bunch of them gears on the back already, I'd suggest you go out for a few rides to try out different combos: select a combo, say 46-16 and go out for a ride and don't shift at all. Did you spin out of it too easy? did it feel too hard? if you are thinking about singlespeeding it, I think that you may have notice that you weren't shifting that much, and you likely have a "favorite gear" already.

    It should give you a nice idea of where to start.

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