Colorado Vacation Gearing- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Colorado Vacation Gearing

    I'm planning a trip to Colorado for a week to hit all the best singletrack. I don't want to fool with swapping cogs and need to hear from Colorado SSers for some input.
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  2. #2
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    content deleted as it could possibly offend someone some where some how some time
    Last edited by 29Colossus; 03-22-2007 at 06:45 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29Colossus
    Any answer could be right. You need to offer a bit more information about yourself, what singletrack you will be riding that is the "best". What gearing do you ride now? What terrain? 1,000 feet of climbing in a mile? For miles? etc.
    I have a rigid Redline Monocog 29er with 32 X 18 gearing. I have been riding hard lately in preparation, averaging between 80 and 100 miles a week on the relatively flat local trails here in Dallas.

    I am currently sorting through the top trails in Colorado based on reviews etc. I plan on riding and camping at several different locations to take in as much of CO as possible in a week or so. I'm starting with the "top 10 colorado rides" here on MTBreview to generate a list. I'm not looking for the most extreme technical trails or the most brutal climbs. I'm more interested in scenery and spending time in the saddle.
    http://trails.mtbr.com/cat/united-st...3_5843crx.aspx

    If I get an idea of the range of gearing people are using in CO I can take a middle of the road approach as a start. Since I'm going to be putting in a lot of saddle time I'll probably start with lower gearing and swap cogs if needed.
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  4. #4
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    depends, but..............

    jk,
    Try using a 3.3 'gain ratio' per Sheldon Browns calculator.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

    That should be a good start. Turning more may be 'do-able' but will really take away from the 'scenic' aspect you desire.
    Also, can be a lot if the trails are DRY, as they are these days.
    Make sure you run LOW tire pressure...............

    C.


    Quote Originally Posted by jkish
    I have a rigid Redline Monocog 29er with 32 X 18 gearing. I have been riding hard lately in preparation, averaging between 80 and 100 miles a week on the relatively flat local trails here in Dallas.

    I am currently sorting through the top trails in Colorado based on reviews etc. I plan on riding and camping at several different locations to take in as much of CO as possible in a week or so. I'm starting with the "top 10 colorado rides" here on MTBreview to generate a list. I'm not looking for the most extreme technical trails or the most brutal climbs. I'm more interested in scenery and spending time in the saddle.
    http://trails.mtbr.com/cat/united-st...3_5843crx.aspx

    If I get an idea of the range of gearing people are using in CO I can take a middle of the road approach as a start. Since I'm going to be putting in a lot of saddle time I'll probably start with lower gearing and swap cogs if needed.

  5. #5
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    I run the good ole 2:1 on the 3 SS I ride. I walk some, sure but am to lazy to change em out and honestly don't even think about it. I'd say stick with what ya got and go from there. Have fun.
    Gone are the days we stopped to decide,
    Where we should go,
    We just ride...

  6. #6
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    You've heard the saying (especially since you're from Dallas) "It's not the heat, it's the humidity." Well, it's not the steeps, it's the altitude. For low elevation flat landers it's definitely the altitude. I'd plan the first couple of days at lower elevation rides. This will help get you aclimated for higher elevations. Leave Crusty Butt for the last. Gear lower than you think, especially if you want to take in the sceneary.

  7. #7
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    32 x 19 works great for me

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