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  1. #1
    mvi
    mvi is offline
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    Cog guide plates?

    Has anybody tried to run guide plates on the side of their rear cog to prevent chain drops?
    I'm thinking making them from old cd roms (did Trevor Brown once have this?).
    Would a large (>23T) cog, in combination with the guides decrease the need for chain tensioner on a vertical dropout frame?

  2. #2
    is buachail foighneach me
    Reputation: sean salach's Avatar
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    the need for a tensioner on a vertical dropout frame(with a standard hub) is based entirely in chainstay length and gearing choice. check out http://eehouse.org/fixin/formfmu.php and enter all the relevent info. running a guide out back might help if you have slack chain tension or a flexy frame, but you would also need to run one up front if that's the case. an eno hub is still the best way to run ss on a vertical dropout frame and still have the option of whatever gearing you want.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jason Boi's Avatar
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    I've DIY mine using old cassettes. You can try it's very simple.



    Here's how: https://fakawitribe.com/home/index.p...d=61&Itemid=47
    Put something exciting between your legs. Ride a mountain bike.

  4. #4
    @adelorenzo
    Reputation: anthony.delorenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvi
    Has anybody tried to run guide plates on the side of their rear cog to prevent chain drops?
    I'm thinking making them from old cd roms (did Trevor Brown once have this?).
    Would a large (>23T) cog, in combination with the guides decrease the need for chain tensioner on a vertical dropout frame?
    It might stop your chain from dropping, but without proper tension the chain will likely skip.

  5. #5
    All 26.5" all the time!
    Reputation: Zanetti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvi
    Has anybody tried to run guide plates on the side of their rear cog to prevent chain drops?
    I'm thinking making them from old cd roms (did Trevor Brown once have this?).
    Would a large (>23T) cog, in combination with the guides decrease the need for chain tensioner on a vertical dropout frame?
    Uh, yeah. http://www.offcamber.com/Product_Reviews/Discos.html

  6. #6
    Mtn Biker Machinist
    Reputation: 1 cog frog's Avatar
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    They work ok...

    I machined a set out of aluminum (along with some cassette spacers) a year ago and have been running them ever since. I had them on a hardtail conversion that had a bit of a slack chain (not quite the magic ratio, but close). They helped, but the chain did skip a bit. I am still running them on my cassette hub, but on a frame with an EBB now. Really don't need them anymore, but it's fun to have parts on your bike that you made!

    The only drawback is stuff gets stuck in there sometimes (like the mormon crickets we have in Utah in the summer ).

    Give it a shot, what's the worst that can happen?

    frog

  7. #7
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    Reputation: Devine Intervention's Avatar
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    The Trek Solution

    I was able to pick a set of Trek guide plates up from ebay a while back. These cured the problem I had with a chainring that was not centered on the bottom bracket.

    This is by far the most sanitary solution I have seen.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
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    Discos are the ticket.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zanetti

    That's all folks.

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