Cassette lock ring threading- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cassette lock ring threading

    Reverse or normal?

  2. #2
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    righty-tighty, lefty loosey

    unless you live in the southern hemisphere.

    db

  3. #3
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    Ok, thanks. I'm trying to remove one that hasn't been removed in 20 years. It's a tad tight and I didn't want to be forcing it the wrong direction without confirmation first.

  4. #4
    Misfit Psycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerjasen
    Ok, thanks. I'm trying to remove one that hasn't been removed in 20 years. It's a tad tight and I didn't want to be forcing it the wrong direction without confirmation first.
    if you NEED a chain whip you are doing it right. if you dont you are tightening it.
    Expert of the Internet.
    BECAUSE I SAID SO

  5. #5
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    If it's a screw on casette, you'll need 2 chain whips - one for clockwise and one for anti-clockwise.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerjasen
    Ok, thanks. I'm trying to remove one that hasn't been removed in 20 years. It's a tad tight and I didn't want to be forcing it the wrong direction without confirmation first.
    The first mtb cassette hub (Shimano XT) was introduced in 1987. It did not have a separate lock ring, the outer cog threaded on and doubled as the lock ring. You need two chain whips to remove the cassette.
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  7. #7
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    Turns out it's an old suntour freewheel. I'm still learning my terminology, like the difference between a cassette and a freewheel. I searched the bike shops and managed to find someone with a Park Tool FR-2 in stock. A heck of a lot of grunt and it came free, no chain whip needed.

    Now to go shopping for parts to get this old road bike over to a singlespeed.
    Last edited by gixxerjasen; 11-05-2006 at 08:33 PM. Reason: adding link

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by gixxerjasen
    Turns out it's an old suntour freewheel. I'm still learning my terminology, like the difference between a cassette and a freewheel. I searched the bike shops and managed to find someone with a Park Tool FR-2 in stock. A heck of a lot of grunt and it came free, no chain whip needed.

    Now to go shopping for parts to get this old road bike over to a singlespeed.
    Yup, freewheels are a different animal. Multi-speed freewheel hubs/wheels are not usually a good candidates for SS conversions as the chainline with be too far to the inside. You can re-space the axle and re-dish the wheel sometimes but that is not likely on a 20 year old wheel.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  9. #9
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    I went through the same thing - working on trying to convert an old GT hybrid bike into a round-town SS. Thought I had a cassette, and struggled mightily with chainwhip and tools, and ended up with just a little bashing to loosen everything up. It turned out to be a one-piece freewheel instead. This is why my SS project is a learning process!

    After much mulling over of the bmx freewheel option, I saw right away that the chainline was going to be too much of an issue (as shiggy mentioned), so I ended up just buying a cheap rear wheel from Jenson. Now I can use a singlespeed cog and spacers and line everything up just right. Of course now I have to deal with a cog that wants a singlespeed chain and a chainring that wants a multispeed chain, but that's just part of the fun!

    I haven't even had one ride on this yet but I'm getting very close.

  10. #10
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    Yea, so much for turning my bike sitting in my garage into a cheapo quick SS. I'm off to scour for more parts now.

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