Cassette Hub Question- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cassette Hub Question

    Is it a really bad idea to buy a standard MTB rear hub for SS use? I'm looking at building up (or just buying) a set of light disc wheels that I can use for both my cross bike (which is disc only and spaced for MTB wheels) and my 29er SS.

    I can't see any issues, and I've actually used a Bonty RaceLite Disc 29 wheelset on my GF Rig for a race (since the stock wheels seem to be made of lead) and, though I had to scrounge around the garage for enough spacers, it seemed to work just fine.

    I guess the fact that there's some additional dish is bad in theory, but...

    What am I missing?

    Thanks,

    Scott

  2. #2
    34N 118W
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    no

    Quote Originally Posted by sawhite
    Is it a really bad idea to buy a standard MTB rear hub for SS use?
    no, crawling through the bushes to watch your best friend's girl take a shower is a really bad idea (trust me).

    Using a std. rear hub for SS is fine - many have done it, myself included and had no problems. A dedicated, dishless SS wheel may be stronger but I never had problems with my dished XT gearie hub. Pay more attention to the hub body and the type of cog you plan to use with it. A soft alu body can get torn up by a thin steel cog.

    HW

  3. #3
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    Good job! more info needed!!!!

    [QUOTE=Hollywood]no, crawling through the bushes to watch your best friend's girl take a shower is a really bad idea (trust me).

    Care to elaborate on this one....a good day time story is always fun at work

    Sorry for the post hijack....I have a set of Crossmax that I use with a novatec cog and spacers and it is great. I would love to have a dedicated SS wheelset but why spend money when you have wheels laying around the house?

    No worries...plenty of wheels on ebay and from online shops at great prices

    Rich
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  4. #4
    Expert Pushing SSer
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    [QUOTE=yetirich]
    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    no, crawling through the bushes to watch your best friend's girl take a shower is a really bad idea (trust me).

    Care to elaborate on this one....a good day time story is always fun at work
    Agreed, photos needed too!

    I scored a set of XT/x317s for near the $100 mark. They serve as a backup set for the [cough] geared bike [cough]. So there are tons of deals out there.
    Tuff Schist

  5. #5
    Probably drunk right now
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    I feel violated and dirty....

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    no, crawling through the bushes to watch your best friend's girl take a shower is a really bad idea (trust me).

    Using a std. rear hub for SS is fine - many have done it, myself included and had no problems. A dedicated, dishless SS wheel may be stronger but I never had problems with my dished XT gearie hub. Pay more attention to the hub body and the type of cog you plan to use with it. A soft alu body can get torn up by a thin steel cog.

    HW
    How could you?

    IMO, a standard rear hub with spacers is better than a SS specific wheel. Then again, I may be biased because that's the way my bike is set up.

    Ken
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Where's Toto?
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    Having used both...

    1. If you're using an EBB with verticle drops it's no sweat; tension derived from a bolt-on style hub isn't necessary to hold the wheel in place. If you're using a geared hub with horizontal dropouts, you'll generally need to add a chain tensioner to keep the axle from slipping forward from the torque. Surly makes a nice one that includes an adapter that sizes it down to a QR skewer. I prefer using bolt on QR skewers when going this route.

    2. If your geared hub has an alumimun freehub body, you'll want to use a wide base cog (as opposed to a cog out of a cassette). The wider base spreads the forces and prevents the freehub body from being gouged. Boone makes some sweet Ti cogs with a wide base. Endless, Surly, and King make cogs for the rest of us. You'll also need spacers to fill in the gap.

    3. If you follow these guidelines, you should have no problem. In fact there's some distinct advantages to going this route. This is especially true if you've got a frame with EBB or sliding drops that's both SS and geared capable. Only one wheelset required.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC
    How could you?

    IMO, a standard rear hub with spacers is better than a SS specific wheel. Then again, I may be biased because that's the way my bike is set up.

    Ken
    sorry, this is off topic...

    what brand cog is that? how much? do the flanges actually do anything? seems like the chain tends to fall of the front chainring, so they wouldn't serve much purpose back there.

    back on topic... i just bought a new set of wheels, std rear hub, for my new frame, which will be a SS. the frame is geared, has a deraillier hanger and vert drops, so i will run a tensioner. this way i can switch it to geared with little hassle if I want to down the road. at least until next year this will be my only bike, so being able to switch if needed seems like a big advantage for me. if you have a SS specific frame, though, and can afford it, seems like a ss specific hub is better.

  8. #8
    Rollin' a fatty Moderator
    Reputation: DiRt DeViL's Avatar
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    You can do this



    PVC spacers, cheap and easy.


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