Carbon or Ti Bars for rigid??- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Carbon or Ti Bars for rigid??

    Hey All,

    I just started riding rigid and was wondering which handlebar material would provide the best dampening characteristics.

    I could not find a post about this, so any opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    I am trying decide between something like a Ragley Carnegie, Ti Groovey or BS custom bar to meet similar characteristics.

    The bike is a one9 with a waltworks fork and steel groovey Luv handles and all of my riding is in Colorado, so a mix of types of terrain.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    Tough crowd today. I'm not much help because I didn't notice much of a difference from riding on my bike with aluminum bars versus carbon fiber.

    I've heard great things about Carnegies.

    Hopefully more people chip in- I'd be interested in hearing some opinions myself.

  3. #3
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    grip and glove choice will matter more.

  4. #4
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    I can't offer much input on carbon because I'm an old luddite, and thus scared of the stuff. However, using the same glove / grip combination, I noticed a huge difference when going from aluminum bars to the BS ti bars that are on my bike now. The same was true of switching from an alu' bar to the ti flat trackers on my rigid fat chance. I'm sold on titanium as a handlebar material.

  5. #5
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    Thanks!

    What grip and glove combo's would you recommend.

    Currently I ride with Ergon GC3 bar ends with the softer GR grip, so I do prefer bar ends of some sort.

  6. #6
    Ovaries on the Outside
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    You'd have to do a search, as the opinions really vary on gloves and especially on grips. While we're at it, tires and psi make a difference, as does a suspension fork....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccornacc
    Currently I ride with Ergon GC3 bar ends with the softer GR grip, so I do prefer bar ends of some sort.
    If you want to run bar ends, you might want to reconsider running carbon bars. I know some of them now rate that you can run bar ends, but I'm just still leary of that unless you get bar ends specifically for carbon bars and install with a torque wrench.

  8. #8
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    I often ride without gloves (usually when I forget them, or my dog chews one of a pair) So I'm not that fussy about the gloves I buy. As for bar-ends; the Blacksheep bars I have are the Mountain Moustache variant. They are 28 inches wide and sweep back dramatically at the ends. This creates a sort of built-in bar-end for climbing. The only thing, with these bars, you are kind of obliged (at least asthetically) to use bar tape. So I don't use a traditional "grip"

  9. #9
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Keeping topic focused on rigid bikes. I have used both alloy and Carbon bars. Using the same grip and glove the carbon bars made a big difference for me in that my hands would not be numb during the ride.

    After experimenting with rigid this summer with a WB carbon fork and easton carbon bars it was actually very nice. Granted a suspension fork would have more give, but that was not the point. Found that running a larger tire setup tubeless at a lower PSI will give you pneumatic suspension either making the ride very bouncy and harsh or smooth. If the tire pressure gets to low then your riding the rim.

    Gloves I like are full fingered versions without padding paired with ESI grips regardless of which bike I'm riding.

  10. #10
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    +1 on ESI grips. Chunky's rule!

  11. #11
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    having used alloy & ti, the ti gets my vote but it also depends on the rigid fork & stem you are using.....me ti for all 3 (bars/stem/fork) along with the ti frame.....a bit of flex but springy too.....the ride quality is where its at....& ESI chunkys with thin grips......for the feel

  12. #12
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    +1 even though I am riding a Raceface Next 3/4" riser bar at the moment. Honestly, If I had the $$ I would be on Ti bars. They definitely absorb a little more imo. Then again, I am riding on a White Bro's fork which softening the blow actually generates a little chatter.

    As far as grips and glove choice I also agree that these choices will make a bigger difference. Personally, I have riden the Ergon's and can't stand the way they feel. I really like my ESI racers edge grips and they weigh next to nothing. I also have some Cane Creek bar ends but will be dumping them in the spring for some plastic ones or none at all as I turn into a weight weenie.

  13. #13
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    Thanks everyone! This helps.

  14. #14
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    I have the blacksheep mustache bar and it's not even a comparison to carbon. The ti is way more compliant. They are expensive but can last forever where carbon wears out. Where are you in co? I am in Denver if you want to give them a test ride.



    Quote Originally Posted by ccornacc
    Hey All,

    I just started riding rigid and was wondering which handlebar material would provide the best dampening characteristics.

    I could not find a post about this, so any opinions would be greatly appreciated.

    I am trying decide between something like a Ragley Carnegie, Ti Groovey or BS custom bar to meet similar characteristics.

    The bike is a one9 with a waltworks fork and steel groovey Luv handles and all of my riding is in Colorado, so a mix of types of terrain.

    Thanks!

  15. #15
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    I've got an Edge/Enve mountain sweep carbon bar with ESI Chunkys and it's a great combo for me riding rigid...

  16. #16
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    I am up in the Boulder area and may take you up on that at some point. I'll PM you.

  17. #17
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    I really like my carbon Carnegies, and I'm using Dimension cork grips. I don't wear gloves unless it's cold out. I'm using a carbon On-One fork.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wish I Were Riding
    I really like my carbon Carnegies, and I'm using Dimension cork grips. I don't wear gloves unless it's cold out. I'm using a carbon On-One fork.
    My dimension cork grips lasted one ride and weren't that comfortable to begin with. Certainly stylish.

  19. #19
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    F$%@ Carbon

    Carbon Fiber is glorified plastic dude, aint nothing else. If you have a chance of standing on a podium that has a cash purse use carbon if you dare. Hey the pros use carbon right, oh ya they ride there equipment for 1 season at most and then off load it on ebay, I love how they pay homage to the brands that endorse them( in these very forums) .I personally like stuff that lasts a long long time, therefore I aint gonna put no plastic on my ride, no how no way. Just my opinion.

  20. #20
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    I've got a set of each, carbon's on one of the geared, BS Ti mustache' on the SS

    I much prefer the Ti, I use ESI with no bar tape, A pic of the aforementioned "mustache bars"


    wherever you go, there you are

  21. #21
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    .............
    Last edited by steven.c; 12-10-2010 at 06:34 PM. Reason: nevermind....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by umarth
    My dimension cork grips lasted one ride and weren't that comfortable to begin with. Certainly stylish.
    Mine have held up fine except for one small spot I ripped when I crashed. What grips do you prefer that are more durable, comfortable, and stylish?

  23. #23
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    biddaddybiker, although you have some valid points and historically, in the past, it may have been more true... we're in 2011 and the "glorified plastic" has come a long way. One example is carbon fiber forks used to be laminated and bonded aluminum dropouts to carbon or carbon forks to aluminum steerer etc. These days, it's called MONOCOQUE. The tech has come far from the days you speak of. I bent and destroyed a 7075 alloy bar that was made by Syncros for downhill use. The same type of fall happening multiple times did nothing to my carbon fiber bars (easton). Im sure other variables were to play, but point being, with actual use, you'll see the light. Pun intended.
    Creative Producer, Will of the Sun, Platform Pedal Shootout 1M+ views WoS

  24. #24
    openwound
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    Easton dh carbon bars, heavy a$$ ODI lock-on grips, full-finger gloves (my cat doesn't chew my gloves). I might be willing to try a set of padded full-finger gloves if I could find some...

    Personally, I've yet to see a set of carbon bars break. Yeah, I know there are pictures all over the interwebs, but I've yet to see it. And no, I'm not looking forward to seeing it on my bike, which is why I use a torque wrench and inspect my bike. I might try ti if I found a money tree...
    -- let's ride

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