Is Carbon Rigid much more forgiving than Steel Rigid fork?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 45 of 45
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sandyeggo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    436

    Is Carbon Rigid much more forgiving than Steel Rigid fork?

    I have a stock fork on my Redline 'Cog. It is the first rigid fork I've had since my 93 Hardrock. So far I'm really digging the feel and handling of a rigid fork but I have bad hands/wrists and they are hurting a bit (they don't hurt riding the geared HT).

    I'd prefer to keep a rigid fork rather than move to a suspension fork and I heard that a carbon fork is more forgiving.

    The question for you wise folks on the SS forum is just how much of a difference does it really make? Is it worth giving it a shot?

  2. #2
    surly inbred
    Reputation: TroutBum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,537
    Quote Originally Posted by sandyeggo View Post
    The question for you wise folks on the SS forum is just how much of a difference does it really make?
    It'll make a difference in your wallet thickness, but your **** is still going to hurt anyway.


    Search the interwebs... we've been round this one a few times before.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ne_dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    560
    Its comes down to more than just forgiving. Better steering and braking are also a benefit of a carbon fork. Not to mention the weight loss. There are good steel fork but I prefer a carbon fork.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sandyeggo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    436
    Thanks for the responses!

  5. #5
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Bigger front tire and less psi will have more noticeable affect. Or just get a shock suspension front fork.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ts818's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    63
    define:
    better steering and braking

    I've been wondering if these are worth the hype 2, and what kind of hits can they take, if i start doin some unplanned front flipping am i going to be out of a half a grand.

  7. #7
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by ts818 View Post
    define:
    better steering and braking..
    Less flex and dive.

    Quote Originally Posted by ts818 View Post
    ...I've been wondering if these are worth the hype 2, and what kind of hits can they take, if i start doin some unplanned front flipping am i going to be out of a half a grand.
    Better question is what kind of hits can your hands, wrists, arms and face take?

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ts818's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    63
    But aren't "flex and dive" what us "rigid looking for possibly more absorbtion in a carbon fork" riders looking for? I can understand why those are bad, but my stock steel doesn't seem to do much of that anyhow. Maybe someone telling me that the carbon fork is going to perform better, be as rigid, but transfer less vibration into the hands and forearms as fatigue... maybe that is what I'm expecting to hear?

    I mean the niner forks look saweet, but that can't justify the $395, and the whole lightweight front end adds to the argument, but I wanna hear someone tell me that its going to feel better than the steel rigid as well. Otherwise I just don't get it.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ne_dan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by ts818 View Post
    But aren't "flex and dive" what us "rigid looking for possibly more absorbtion in a carbon fork" riders looking for? I can understand why those are bad, but my stock steel doesn't seem to do much of that anyhow. Maybe someone telling me that the carbon fork is going to perform better, be as rigid, but transfer less vibration into the hands and forearms as fatigue... maybe that is what I'm expecting to hear?

    I mean the niner forks look saweet, but that can't justify the $395, and the whole lightweight front end adds to the argument, but I wanna hear someone tell me that its going to feel better than the steel rigid as well. Otherwise I just don't get it.
    I've raced on both on a carbon and steel fork. I could feel the steel fork flex (twist) when cornering hard, and when going fast into exposed roots and rocks, the steel fork gets overwhelmed and just deflects and does its own line choice. On the other hand the carbon fork doesn't twist and where you point it is where you go.

    Now if you are just the type of rider that cruises along you'll must likely never notice the difference between the two.

    And you can find the niner fork for much cheaper than $395 if you look around.

  10. #10
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by ts818 View Post
    But aren't "flex and dive" what us "rigid looking for possibly more absorbtion in a carbon fork" riders looking for? I can understand why those are bad, but my stock steel doesn't seem to do much of that anyhow. Maybe someone telling me that the carbon fork is going to perform better, be as rigid, but transfer less vibration into the hands and forearms as fatigue... maybe that is what I'm expecting to hear?

    I mean the niner forks look saweet, but that can't justify the $395, and the whole lightweight front end adds to the argument, but I wanna hear someone tell me that its going to feel better than the steel rigid as well. Otherwise I just don't get it.
    My bad, for some reason, I thought you had a suspension fork. So nevermind my comment.

    I'm not a rigid connoisseur, so can't tell you the intriquate differences between the various forks available. But all I know is that when things get bumpy, it hurts. Especially if you're on it for hours at a time. You may be able to notice subtle differences, but don't expect a magic carpet ride.

  11. #11
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,378
    Quote Originally Posted by ne_dan View Post
    I've raced on both on a carbon and steel fork. I could feel the steel fork flex (twist) when cornering hard, and when going fast into exposed roots and rocks, the steel fork gets overwhelmed and just deflects and does its own line choice. On the other hand the carbon fork doesn't twist and where you point it is where you go.

    Now if you are just the type of rider that cruises along you'll must likely never notice the difference between the two.

    And you can find the niner fork for much cheaper than $395 if you look around.
    **** carbon forks. Mine bounced all over the ****ing place and made me hate my 29er even more.

    Everyone is going to have an opinion they think is the goddamned truth on this subject because everyone has a **** spewing *******. Your own experience may vary, but I'm more than content with a steel fork.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by ne_dan View Post
    I've raced on both on a carbon and steel fork. I could feel the steel fork flex (twist) when cornering hard, and when going fast into exposed roots and rocks, the steel fork gets overwhelmed and just deflects and does its own line choice. On the other hand the carbon fork doesn't twist and where you point it is where you go.

    Now if you are just the type of rider that cruises along you'll must likely never notice the difference between the two.

    And you can find the niner fork for much cheaper than $395 if you look around.
    Not trying to bash your experience as experience counts for a lot, but are going off of only one steel fork and/or only one carbon fork? The design and specific material specs can make as much or more of a difference in the performance of the fork as the basic raw material, and given how many carbon and steel forks are available I would suggest that there is a lot of room for even the complete opposite of your personal observations to be true

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    200
    I prefer my Fox F100 RLC over rigid, because it has a lock out and some voodoo magic dampening system. I tried rigid and there are many upsides but it was not for me.
    Friends don't let friends ride geared bikes

  14. #14
    surly inbred
    Reputation: TroutBum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,537
    Quote Originally Posted by b0mb3r View Post
    I prefer my Fox F100 RLC over rigid, because it has a lock out and some voodoo magic dampening system. I tried rigid and there are many upsides but it was not for me.
    Uh oh, sParty's gonna bust your ass for having a wet fork.

  15. #15
    surly inbred
    Reputation: TroutBum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,537
    Quote Originally Posted by umarth View Post
    Everyone is going to have an opinion they think is the goddamned truth on this subject because everyone has a **** spewing *******. Your own experience may vary, but I'm more than content with a steel fork.
    You PMS'n this week?

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    10,035
    Quote Originally Posted by TroutBum View Post
    You PMS'n this week?
    must be, he's bleeding asterisks all over the place

  17. #17
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,378
    Quote Originally Posted by TroutBum View Post
    You PMS'n this week?
    Nope, just helping my dad with one of his home improvement projects. No amount of beer will cure what I'm feeling.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by TroutBum View Post
    Uh oh, sParty's gonna bust your ass for having a wet fork.
    wet fork, good one.
    Friends don't let friends ride geared bikes

  19. #19
    surly inbred
    Reputation: TroutBum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,537
    Quote Originally Posted by umarth View Post
    Nope, just helping my dad with one of his home improvement projects. No amount of beer will cure what I'm feeling.
    Ewwwww. That's like one step away from Mrs. U asking how her 29er looks.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Flat Ark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,645
    I've had White Bros., Pace and Niner carbon forks. I had a steel Salsa El Mariachi fork that put ALL of them to shame as far as ride quality was concerned! The carbon forks are just too stiff and unforgiving.

  21. #21
    banned
    Reputation: Mr_Nice_Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    197
    I just got a Salsa Cromoto 445mm A-C fork to replace the stock Raleigh fork on my 2007 non suspension corrected XXIX...I have had the Cromoto Grande on 2 El Mariachi's and look forward to the performance on this bike as well...an upgrade for sure!!

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fattirebliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    253
    I ride a carbon fork, and most of the time I forget I am rigid. I wrapped up a 65 mile race last weekend and didn't have a sore muscle in my body. I love the way it handles as well...

  23. #23
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,378
    Quote Originally Posted by TroutBum View Post
    Ewwwww. That's like one step away from Mrs. U asking how her 29er looks.
    ****, that happens a lot too. I need a life redo.

  24. #24
    Dirty South Underdog
    Reputation: Andrea138's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,727
    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark View Post
    I've had White Bros., Pace and Niner carbon forks. I had a steel Salsa El Mariachi fork that put ALL of them to shame as far as ride quality was concerned! The carbon forks are just too stiff and unforgiving.
    That's because you live in Arkansas, and every trail there is covered in golf to basketball-sized rocks
    Brickhouse Blog (most known unknown)

    Just Riding Along- best internet radio show on Mountain Bike Radio

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    293
    Just converted a mid 80's BRC Voodoo steel ridged to SS. My wrists and forearms also hurt until I made a couple of changes.

    Carbon handle bar, noticed the difference right away.
    2.35 tires with 25 lbs psi, if I ever convert to tubeless I'II go lower.

    I've got a couple of dozen good rides on it now and I'm definately feeling better in my arms and wrists, wish I could say the same for my lungs

    Cheers,
    Straw
    Ease & Flow Where Ever I Go

  26. #26
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,819
    Much more forgiving, no. A little more forgiving, yes.

    A few years back when I had my first 29er, an On One Inbred, the only mtb I had since I sold my two 26" bikes, I was riding my cross bike and had an accident, breaking bones in my shoulder, front and back.

    Once the doc cleared me to ride, I went out on an easy gravel road ride, but had to give up in very few miles due to the throbbing pain in my shoulder. So I bought an On One carbon fork.

    In a week I was back out and able to ride just fine, and some smoother single track, since the vibration dampening was what I needed. Felt good to get back to the dirt after nine months of injury complications.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    156
    i think the real draw to carbon was the stiffness, laterally. as far as compliance, man its a rigid fork. what else do you expect? fairies that come lift you over the rough stuff? I ride rigid carbon in colorado where it is really rocky and steep and what ever else you can find to make it worse. Its a totally different riding style, you adsorb the hits in your tires and your arms and knees. Natures shock absorbers.

    The lateral stiffness make it way better for high speed turns and climbing. I had no idea how flexy my steel fork was until i climbed around a switchback under power on a carbon fork. I ride a niner fork but there are others that get the idea. I just feel that after riding the others that the niner was the best.

  28. #28
    VENI VEDI BIKI
    Reputation: skankingbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    838
    See http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...ps+carbon+fork

    IMHO better than steel on small stuff, but most advantage is weight reduction.

  29. #29
    Category Winner
    Reputation: teamdicky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,049
    Re-reposting this once again:

    This is a cut and paste from this thread (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...85#poststop%29 ). Added info below the photos.

    Since January 2004 I have now owned...

    One Karate Monkey fork ~ Steel
    One custom Waltworks ~ Steel
    Two custom Independent Fabrications (one 473 A-C, one 445 A-C) ~ Steel
    One White Brothers ~ carbon
    Two Salsa Cro-Motos~ Steel
    Three Niner (two 490 A-C, one 470 A-C) ~ Steel
    Some random custom fork I got off eBay (445 A-C) ~ Steel
    One Niner ~ carbon (edit: I'm now riding a 2nd Niner carbon with a tapered steer tube)

    Hands down the Niner carbon is the best riding fork I've owned. It's not just the weight, it's the ride. The lateral rigidity is better than most, and it's ability to eat up chatter on the trail is second to none... rigid of course.

    To take the tire selection out of the equation the KM, WW, and tall IF fork were all run on a 26" wheeled single speed with a Diesel 2.5 and the others were run on a 29" single speed with a Rampage up front.

    I don't wanna dig through a mess of photos, but I swear I've owned them all and spent a fair amount of time on each riding them all over the fricking place.








    I want to add that a more compliant fork will help with some hand/wrist pain, but it may not make it go away. Body position, grip choice, tire pressure/selection... there's a lot to consider when making a rigid bike "comfortable."
    Last edited by teamdicky; 07-23-2011 at 06:21 AM.
    WWW.TEAMDICKY.COM

    I get paid 3 every time I post on MTBR.

  30. #30
    ilmfat
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    904
    much more forgiving? no.

    how much of a difference does it really make? not much.

    Is it worth giving it a shot? yes, especially if you want my on-one cf fork.
    crap! i gotta learn to climb. - 2011

    Climbing ain't so bad. - 2019

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lumbee1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,908
    Once I sell my FS bike, I am looking for a nice rigid fork for my 29'er SS. I have a Karate Monkey fork and Vassago Odis fork now. The Odis is currently installed. The ride characteristics of the Odis were shocking different from the Monkey fork. The Odis feels compliant and smooth over a variety of surfaces. It has a front suspension feel without the bobbing and diving of a suspension fork. The Monkey fork was brutal even with an Ardent 2.4 up front. Rough sections made me nervous, and I typically covered the brakes on any downhill section to avoid being beat up.

    Now that I know that all rigid forks don't ride the same, I am interested in something better to carry from frame to frame. High on my list are the Salsa Cromoto Grande ($100), custom Waltworks ($275), or a Niner Carbon ($375). Both the final price of the Salsa and Waltworks will be a bit higher since I want a custom color. The Salsa appeals to me due to the price and quality of the steel. A custom Waltworks would be designed for me and match any steel 29'er frame I choose in the future. The Niner is the ultimate rigid fork and has received rave reviews but the price tag is pretty staggering.

    The custom painted Waltworks is close to the price of a Niner Carbon and a Niner Carbon is getting into Salsa fork and frame territory. So what should I do?

  32. #32
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,378
    I just got a steel fork for my 29er and took it out for a ride. I think my carbon fiber fork ate up the small bumps better, but the performance is close. If you are not being lazy and keeping your hands loose, you probably wouldn't notice the difference.

    On bigger bumps and where things get techy, the steel fork was better, without comparison. My White Bros jumped all over and was pretty skittish, but the steel fork is much more stable feeling, predictable. I did 15.5 miles and hit stuff pretty fast and I wasn't too beat up at the end.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: lwebber60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    143
    I went with the Niner Carbon fork on my Jabber this spring. I ran the Vassago Odis last year great fork, but I like the Niner fork for the following reasons:

    1- Lightweight
    2-Very precise, no twisting, point and shoot is what I call it
    3-Does absorb the smaller hits, big stuff beats you up, hell what do you expect it's rigid!

    Overall I like the Niner Carbon, anyone looking for a Vassago Odis fork? might have one for sale...
    2008 Trek 69er SS
    2010 Vassago Jabberwocky SS

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rbrandow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    61
    If you look at the numbers involved from a materials science standpoint, the difference between the response of a robust carbon fiber fork and a thin wall steel fork are real small compared to other differences. The differences due to the material used should also be very small relative to fork construction; saying carbon fiber handles like a noodle could well be more a function of the geometry in the fork legs as opposed to the elastic modulus of the stuff.

    The more reasonable response seems to be "small change compared to tires, air pressure or just running a suspension", which is what the material science suggests as well.

  35. #35
    Ovaries on the Outside
    Reputation: umarth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,378
    Quote Originally Posted by rbrandow View Post
    IThe more reasonable response seems to be "small change compared to tires, air pressure or just running a suspension", which is what the material science suggests as well.
    As far as personal experience on bikes is concerned, I think you nailed it. PSI, cushy grips, carbon fiber everywhere with 2.5 tubeless tires... well, you're still running rigid. Some of those things help so 16 miles is fairly comfortable when before it was 15. Learning to ride rigid is the real key.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    6,542
    It's weird because I have steel forks on both my 29er (On One Inbred) and my generic aluminum SS and my 29er is MUCH more harsh than my 26" bike. There is a huge difference in the harshness, which almost makes me not want to ride my 29er.

    I had a carbon fork on my MotoB Ti, and it was wonderful. I also have a carbon fork on my steel CX bike (Pake CMute) and it is also very nice.

    I may upgrade to a Niner Fork when some extra cash comes around. From my experience, I think it would make a difference for my On One Sherman Tank.

  37. #37
    renaissance cyclist
    Reputation: debusama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    309
    I have a Redline d440 which I believe has the same fork as a Monocog. As far as rigid forks go, It is pretty compliant. Some forks might be better, but I can't help but think that if your wrists can't handle the Redline fork, maybe they just can't handle rigid forks. In addition to higher volume tires with lower pressure, you might find a bar with more rise would bring you a little more upright to take some weight of of your hands. If you've really got $400 dollars you want to spend on taking some pressure off of your wrists you may as well just get a suspension fork.

  38. #38
    Low Rep Count
    Reputation: 1SPD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,958
    I have ridden both. The carbon as stated seems to perform better, weighs less and costs more! It does dampen some of the blows but if anything just takes the sting out a little. My steel experience was similar to what was listed above in that it weighs more but imo provided a softer ride. It did flex and twist more however.

    I think that if I was doing the whole fork thing over again I would either be buying a Niner or looking at a suspension fork of some sort (Lefty). Then again, I really like the Black Cat Bone but if I'm dropping that much money on a fork, it will certainly have some squish to it.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    138
    Just went through this from the P2 that came with the Kona unit to a niner carbon. I should have saved my money like Umarth told me. The carbon is better at small bumps but steel is better on the big bumps and lower tire pressure fixes the small bumps. If you hit the carbon fork on a bump directly in line with the fork legs there is no flex and you will feel it all the way to the top of your head. I dont remember ever getting that with the steel fork. Also if you hit the front too far up the wheel or to far back the carbon flexes then throws you back or slaps like early suspension forks did. lateral flex? Yes!! When climbing really hard with a wide bar I could rub the brake disk from side to side with each pedal stroke even with the front hub over tightened. I think the stainless dropout inserts are so good my QR isnt even making scratches in them.

    Sorry for the long rant but it was a poor way to loose 1lb off my bike and I dont think it rides any better.

    PS. I love the look of the steel fork. 400 bones would have got me a new saddle, pedals and tires or an xtr crank.
    Last edited by k29er; 09-27-2011 at 06:54 PM.
    2011 Kona unit with some carbon.

  40. #40
    Did I catch a niner+?
    Reputation: Mr Pink57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,953
    I noticed the Niner fork was more forgiving on my local trails vs my Cromoto I use now. The carbon definitely has more give I have never tried the standard style only a bladed Niner fork.

    Overall I will say I just prefer a rigid bike to a HT so far, even with those GOD DAMN high speed braking areas it really shows on shitty people are to trails!
    Mr. Krabs: Is it true, Squidward? Is it hilarious?

  41. #41
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pink57 View Post
    Overall I will say I just prefer a rigid bike to a HT so far, even with those GOD DAMN high speed braking areas it really shows on shitty people are to trails!
    As a trail designer / builder / fixer, you hit a nerve so I had to +rep you on that.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ktm520's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,588
    I've ridden a grand total of 2 steel forks: stock Monocog 29 and Vassago Odis. Imo, the ODIS completely destroys the Monocog fork in all aspects. I couldn't believe the difference.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    19
    I have the Zombie 500mm Steel fork. I honestly believe I was the first person to buy this fork since I ordered it through BTI the moment it became available. Anyway I've had a lot of time with it and I think its fantastic. Be warned not all steel is the same and not all carbon is the same. This fork is way more forgiving than the Karate Monkey fork, which is also steel. I have heard good things about the carbon forks out there, but all of them are too short for my liking.

    Dont forget you have about 12" of travel in your forearms, use it! bend those elbows, pump and respond!

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: badgermtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    571
    I've owned/ridden:

    White Bros Crabon
    Exotic Crabon
    Salsa Cromoto (2)
    Singular (490)
    Niner steel (490 and 470)

    The crabon fork was stiff...and not as "soft" riding as the steel forks. It seemed to punish me more, all other components being the same. My wrists were tired. It was light...almost too light, if that makes sense. I never felt confident in the crabon...I always was afraid I would snap it at the steer tube. I do not worry about breaking a steel fork. Weight be damned.

    The Niner steel and Singular forks ride very well. Both are reynolds steel.

    The Salsa forks are really very nice. They are tough, finished well, and ride pretty smooth.

    I say go with steel if you go rigid. If you are going to spend 4hundo on a fork, ight as well buy a sus fork.

  45. #45
    The perfessor
    Reputation: mr_chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    754
    now to make you laugh........my stock KHS steel fork was pretty good but the front end was heavy; I enjoyed the ride, though, just hated climbing over obstacles........put a no-name CF 29er fork on and dropped two lbs., made the climbing much easier but CF is almost "bouncier" than steel.....CF has good rigidity (my right elbow / thumb attest to that): downhill sorta wicked but flats / uphill pretty great........
    Rigid 29er Ti SS
    KHS Solo One SE 29er
    29er SC Tallboy AL
    Paketa Magnesium Road Bike

Similar Threads

  1. Rigid Fork: Steel or Carbon?
    By schingleschpeed in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-13-2008, 04:22 AM
  2. Best rigid 29er fork? Carbon, alloy or steel.
    By Juanmoretime in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-08-2008, 06:36 PM
  3. Best rigid fork. Carbon, alloy or steel.
    By Juanmoretime in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-06-2008, 07:20 AM
  4. Carbon vs Steel rigid fork?
    By Zzbog in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-30-2008, 06:18 AM
  5. rigid fork question: Alu, steel, carbon...
    By jh_on_the_cape in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-24-2004, 05:18 PM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.