Carbon bar on SS ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Carbon bar on SS ?

    Okay, so as my singlespeed begins the 2006 weight loss program, I'm contemplating an Easton carbon riser bar. I currently run one on my full suspension bike and really like it. My only concern is that on my singlespeed, I am out of the saddle a lot more, and using the bar for more leverage. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    carbon bars are the way

    I have been using carbon bars for years on my single speeds and have never had a problem. I used a 31.8 FSA bar this year and it is incredibly stiff when you are ut of the saddle really cranking on them. They are 25" and sometime I wish they were an inch wider though. If you ride rigid I would still use 25.4 since they feel more absorbant. I might try an easton CNT in a 26" this year, who knows. I certainly would recomend using carbon bars

  3. #3
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    try ti

    I used Carbon for a while but have recently started using Ti. of course I use a Ti flat bar I see that white bros. makes a Ti riser bar. It may be my head but I do feel more of a dampening effect over carbon. I have used a CT-2 flat and a CT-2 monkeylite riser also alot of aluminum bars and currently a Titec Ti flat bar which I really like.

  4. #4
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socal-Stumpjumper
    Okay, so as my singlespeed begins the 2006 weight loss program, I'm contemplating an Easton carbon riser bar. I currently run one on my full suspension bike and really like it. My only concern is that on my singlespeed, I am out of the saddle a lot more, and using the bar for more leverage. Any thoughts?
    If you're worried about snapping the bar off in your Herculean grip as if it were a dry twig, I don't think that will happen.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socal-Stumpjumper
    Okay, so as my singlespeed begins the 2006 weight loss program, I'm contemplating an Easton carbon riser bar. I currently run one on my full suspension bike and really like it. My only concern is that on my singlespeed, I am out of the saddle a lot more, and using the bar for more leverage. Any thoughts?
    I used a Easton CF riser on my SS for a few years. Really like it alot. In fact, I use the Easton CF on all my MTB rides. Only recently did I change the SS to a Mary bar as an experiment. I prefer the hand position on the Mary, but miss the dampening of the CF.
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  6. #6
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    it's damping, not dampening...bah, whatever

  7. #7
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Upchuck
    I prefer the hand position on the Mary, but miss the dampening [sic] of the CF.
    Sounds as if you're a perfect candidate for the titanium H-Bar.

  8. #8
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    Good job! Jones..

    Try a Jeff Jones H Bar.

    I recently switched over to using one and it's a huge advantage over "ordinary" alloy or carbon bars. I went from a carbon Easton to a Mary, then the JJ H bar.

    The JJ H bar is fantastic. I'm not kidding, this bar is light, strong, has beautiful damping and the hand positions are great.

    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  9. #9
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    A quick answer that grew into a dissertation...

    Easton carbon bars are tested to withstand 10 times the load of their comparable aluminum bar. Be it flat to flat, riser to riser, DH to DH. Each and every bar is tested at a level that would snap its aluminum counterpart prior to being boxed up and shipped. I do not know what any of the other manufacturers do, so I can only speak as to Easton. No I don't work for Easton (as if that is a good thing). Carbon has strengths and weaknesses when compared to both aluminum and Ti. The big thing with carbon is to watch for over clamping in the stem, break lever, shifter (as if), bar ends. The second thing to watch is for gouges, or any other thing that could be a stress riser. Aluminum has nearly the same issues. Both aluminum and carbon are more prone to failure when stress risers are introduced. That is why they shot peen (mat textured look) aluminum, so that any stress areas are relieved. Aluminum can take direct impacts a little better than carbon when it comes to scratches or light abrasions. That is why they have to overbuild carbon cranks, so that there is limited weight reduction over a comparable aluminum crank. Without too much background: 6000 series aluminum is less effected by scratches and dings than 7000. 7000 is stronger per weight than 6000. My aluminum bar preference would be 6061 over 7075. Neither carbon nor aluminum give much warning prior to failure. Since carbon is somewhat still a "black art"for some companies, I would stick with one made from the big boys. Otherwise, I don't feel it is worth the risk. Then again, I would stay away from cheap aluminum too. Easton, Answer, Raceface, and Titec have all served me well. I have seen both break, and in both cases it was just at the interface with the stem. The aluminum bar was a Trek specked item. It happened on a jump. One side snapped, the other bulged as if just prior to a snap. The rider seperated his shoulder. The carbon bar was an early riser. I think maybe an LP, though it has been a while. It happened in a g-out, and not a major one. The rider cracked (did not fracture) his collarbone. After that, I rode exclusively Ti up until finally succumbing to the comfort of a riser. Ti does not usually critically fail like aluminum or carbon. It usually bends, and does not spring back when at its limit. Right now I ride an Easton Carbon XC low rise. Even with their testing, I don't feel comfortable using the SL for extended intervals. If I went back to a strait bar, and could affort it, I would be happy with the Titec 118. Then again, I have broken both collarbones in several places. Call me a wuss I guess.

    General rule of thumb:
    -Ti-nearly unlimited fatigue life, bends instead of snapping, replace if it bends or develops a crease. Oh and protect the ends as it is so thin. My 118 is now 23.5" wide from trimming the ends a few times.
    -Carbon-nearly unlimited fatigue life, snaps at failure, don't buy used or suspect items, replace if gouged or any sign of delamination.
    -Aluminum-about 1/10th the fatigue life of the two above, will bend slightly then snap at failure, don't buy used, replace about each two years or after a major hit.

    Oh and finally...the oversized bars should be better than a traditional one in terms of strength at this critical junction. Having said that, they are likely stiff as hell. Something to keep in mind if you are running fully rigid.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by peehead
    it's damping, not dampening...bah, whatever
    Gee, thanks for the vocab lesson. You really know how to damp a guys spirits.
    Fat fanatic.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Sounds as if you're a perfect candidate for the titanium H-Bar.
    It isn't that I haven't considered the H-Bar. I'm just having troubles justifying the price for a handlebar.

    Anyone know where I can get a JJ for less than MSRP?
    Fat fanatic.

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  12. #12
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Upchuck
    It isn't that I haven't considered the H-Bar. I'm just having troubles justifying the price for a handlebar.

    Anyone know where I can get a JJ for less than MSRP?
    Yeah, good luck finding it for much less than MSRP. All I know is, I'm glad I bought mine and when I buy another one I will get the "budget" stubby version for $159 since I rarely use the extensions. Compare it to an Easton Monkeylite XC at $129.99. I'll gladly kick out the extra $29 for titanium bar handmade by a solo craftsman hermited away in the woods, making components out of love and enthusiasm for the sport.
    Last edited by Nat; 12-18-2005 at 07:45 PM.

  13. #13
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    Carefull

    I think they are plenty strong as long as you don't over tighten the controls or otherwise damage the bar. That said I'm running my last carbon bar on my SS after having a freind who had over tightened one of his brake levers snap his easton bar in a sprint causing him to flip over the right front of the bike; scary but his injuries were minor.

  14. #14
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    Yes, no worries with the carbon bars on the SS. I'm running the EA CF Mky lites and love these bars. I put a lot of pressure on the bars while climbing and have had no issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Socal-Stumpjumper
    Okay, so as my singlespeed begins the 2006 weight loss program, I'm contemplating an Easton carbon riser bar. I currently run one on my full suspension bike and really like it. My only concern is that on my singlespeed, I am out of the saddle a lot more, and using the bar for more leverage. Any thoughts?

  15. #15
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    i have titec pluto riser bars on my SS, they dont seem to flex as much as some carbon bars that ive used so thats a good sign. i did see someone walking to the carpark about the 2nd or 3rd time i was riding the bike with the bars on it with the same bars snapped near the rise which was a little worrying :d


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