Brake Simplicity For SS ?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    T 3
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    Brake Simplicity For SS ?

    Not a SS rider yet,still reading and learning before making the leap.One of the things that
    really surprised me was seeing several SS bikes with disc brakes.Obviously I'm still in the learning stage on SS,but disc brakes (being more complicated and heavier ),seem out of character for SS use.I'm using V-Brakes on my FS and HT and don't think much of disc anyway and was surprised to see them much on SS.
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  2. #2
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    I've got to disagree, if anything, disc brakes add to the simplicity of an SS. They may be newer technology, but maintenance is almost zero on a hydraulic. Bleeding is a very rare thing and not hard. No cable changes or gritty cables or stretched cables, brake pads last forever and they work in all conditions: mud, water, ice, snow. Overall, I spend much less time dealing w/ the disc than V-brakes. Weight wise, the Hope Mini and the Formula B4 are very light.

    I run a disc on the front only since I like to use a flip-flop hub to go between freewheeling and fixed gear, but if it weren't for that, I'd run them on both ends.
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  3. #3
    "Mr. Britannica"
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    When you get your SS

    I bet you don't get discs. Some of us are still using v brakes. To each their own.

  4. #4
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    I use vees on my SS, but my wife's got Avid mechanical discs on her Blur. I have to tell you: they aren't complicated in the least. Very simple to tune, adjust and maintain, and they make wheel removal and replacement faster and easier.

  5. #5
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    Funny you say that

    Because I have had two separate strangers on the trail ask me that same question. After asking me about the SS thing and riding rigid, they both said doesn't the disc brake you run defeat the whole purpose of simplicity and anti-technology. My comment to both was that the disc gives me a little better braking control up front, and it is actually simpler to maintain than always tinkering with pad adjustments on the V brake. I still like V-brakes though, they work well in most conditions.

  6. #6
    If you have to ask...
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    You are right, disc brakes

    are a real hassle. Why, I had to change the brake pads on my Hayes Hydraulics last year. Can you imagine? What a pain! I had to remove my wheels, reach in and pull out the old pads. It took me at least 30 seconds (per wheel, mind you) to put the new pads in, too. Then I had to put the wheels back on the bike. It's a chore I dread, no doubt.
    Even worse, two years ago I had to change the fluid in my brakes. It took me at least half an hour, what with making sure all the old fluid was out and the new in.

    I put up with all the extra hassle because they simply work better than anything else. I'm not really even bothered by the weight- I figure, so what? Who cares that the Hayes don't weigh as much as XT v-brakes? Not me.


    miles

  7. #7
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    and it really really works..

    ..disc brakes work. I waited a long time before I switched over. I use one of the cheapest sets out there; Deore 555's. With a Deore/Alex wheel set, the cost was $300. Disc brakes make about as much sense as eccentric bottom brackets. Not only are they simple they really really work. You don't have to worry about perfectly trued rims, mud on the trail or, with an EBB, even adjusting your brakes. Also a little biased on my part, hydraulic disc brakes have about 8 parts, mechanicals have about 30. I like what works and my SS with an EBB and disc brakes, works better than any other bike I have ever ridden.

    1G1G, Brad
    Last edited by aka brad; 03-02-2004 at 10:53 PM. Reason: clarity

  8. #8
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    I love disc brakes. I will never again buy a bike with v-brakes.
    However I don't know how simple discs are for horizontal drops....
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  9. #9
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    Avids for me

    Mech disc in front and V in the rear works great for me. If I had an EBB frame I'd run disc front and rear. Not quite so fond of the Hayes hydraulics on my FS bike, they always seem to drag a little no matter how much I adjust them.
    Two Wheeled and Too Big

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles
    are a real hassle. Why, I had to change the brake pads on my Hayes Hydraulics last year. Can you imagine? What a pain! I had to remove my wheels, reach in and pull out the old pads. It took me at least 30 seconds (per wheel, mind you) to put the new pads in, too. Then I had to put the wheels back on the bike. It's a chore I dread, no doubt.
    Even worse, two years ago I had to change the fluid in my brakes. It took me at least half an hour, what with making sure all the old fluid was out and the new in.

    I put up with all the extra hassle because they simply work better than anything else. I'm not really even bothered by the weight- I figure, so what? Who cares that the Hayes don't weigh as much as XT v-brakes? Not me.


    miles
    Now that was funny! Just when I neded a laugh!!!! I'm disc on 4 of my 5 bikes.

    HUGH

  11. #11
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    i will never run discs on my SS. up until a couple days ago, i had never felt a set of hydro discs that i liked, other than some HS33s. i run Avid Mechs on my Imperial and they're fine and all, but i don't know if they're really any better than some fine tuned Vs.

    in my humble opinion, the "SS" ideal contradicts itself a lot.

  12. #12
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Yes but what is the SS ideal really. You could start out by saying that it is about simplifying the bike removing the clutter of gears and cables etc. My thinking is that it is about removing as much thought as possible from the riding experience. That is you don't have to think to change gears. You don't have to worry about the brakes getting muddy or rims going out of true because you are running disc brakes. You don't have to worry about every little irregularity in the trail because you have a bit of give from that 3-4 inch fork up front. You can just get on ride and let the whole moment flow from start to finish. So yeah I think discs are better than Vs because you can forget about them.
    'When he's not in action, he's in traction.'

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    My SISS has Avid Mechanicals on it. It does have horizontal dropouts in the rear so the caliper has to be swung up on a sliding mounting hole to remove the rear wheel. It isn't really that bad. I wouldn't win a race if I got a flat in it. Although, that would be a grand excuse for not winning since I would never win a race anyway. (I don't race) When I got my new bike in 2000, I thought to myself how much more braking do I need vs my center pull. I thought I can skid my tire how much more do I need. I got the v's and didn't think there was any difference, until I went back to my old bike. It freaked me out. Then I loved v's. I thought the same thing about disk's. I got the SISS and thought, not much difference. I rode my hardtail with v's and almost crashed. BTW: I am very anal. I work very hard at getting exact pad adjustment on my brakes. It drives me nutz. With disk's, you just pull them out and push them in. The Avid mechancials are grand. Simpler, easy, and stop on a dime. I would say I wouldn't own another bike without them.

    GP

  14. #14
    T 3
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    Removing Thought

    Interesting observation about SS and brakes- "Removing as much thought as possible from the riding experience." That really makes me see things in a different light-still not sure about the brakes,but I'm glad you explained things that way.One of the best things for me about my rides is drifting into a "zone" and less thinking is a good thing for making
    that happen.


    Quote Originally Posted by devlin
    Yes but what is the SS ideal really. You could start out by saying that it is about simplifying the bike removing the clutter of gears and cables etc. My thinking is that it is about removing as much thought as possible from the riding experience. That is you don't have to think to change gears. You don't have to worry about the brakes getting muddy or rims going out of true because you are running disc brakes. You don't have to worry about every little irregularity in the trail because you have a bit of give from that 3-4 inch fork up front. You can just get on ride and let the whole moment flow from start to finish. So yeah I think discs are better than Vs because you can forget about them.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by devlin
    You don't have to worry about every little irregularity in the trail because you have a bit of give from that 3-4 inch fork up front.
    This should open up a nice can of worms...
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  16. #16
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    There is no right answer, just like "there is no spoon". I personally love discs for the fact that I ride throught the sloppiest mud and grime and discs always stop me when needed. My v-brakes would stop me, but at a price of grinding the hell out of me rims when the mud acts as an abravise on the rim braking surface. Avid mechanicals are great. So easy to adjust and worth every meaningless penny. And about sus forks, to each there own. I ride rigid, I ride sus, depends where and how I am riding. There is no one universally correct answer, its what works for you best. But I do agree with the "not thinking" aspect of SS, no gear no changes, just cruise and hammer when needed. More time to check out the scenery, plus chicks think you are extra hard for riding a bike with big ass tires and one gear. My favorite: " why are you out of the saddle so much, you are supposed to sit and spin to climb?" My response as I point to my deralleur free rear, "uh yeah, one gear bud".
    That usually makes their eyes widen and I just wink and smile at them.

  17. #17
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    i ride vees

    because i don't ride in the mud and they just work. if you are a soft handed technophile that can barely hold a glass of water without dropping it then go for discs.

  18. #18
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    Recent disc convert

    As a recent convert to disc brakes (in the front at least) I have to say they are well worth it. One test ride on the road with a disc brake (hope mini) on my geared hardtail convinced me that I absolutely needed one on the front of my SS too. After finally getting in a good trail ride with it this past Sunday, I was convinced I was right - I felt so much more in control on steeper, moderately technical downhills .

    I'd try them on the rear, but neither of my frames are disc capabible and the adaptor I bought will be too much of a hastle w/ horizantal drops since its designed for vertical drops.

    As of last night, the SS now has a Juicy 7 in the front.

    Just my $.02, otherwise to each his own.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by riderx
    I run a disc on the front only since I like to use a flip-flop hub to go between freewheeling and fixed gear, but if it weren't for that, I'd run them on both ends.

    Oh yes, but now you can have your cake and eat it too...free...fixed...disc...

    DT

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by T 3
    Interesting observation about SS and brakes- "Removing as much thought as possible from the riding experience." That really makes me see things in a different light-still not sure about the brakes,but I'm glad you explained things that way.One of the best things for me about my rides is drifting into a "zone" and less thinking is a good thing for making
    that happen.

    you'll quickly drift out of that zone when, after taking a digger, your rotor rubs and the sound is magnified through your frame. by the way, what kind of conditions do you ride in? as mentioned above, sloppy conditions would be better off with discs. if i ever upgrade the Avid Mechs on my Imperial, i will go with Hope Minis. the only upgrade on my SS will be to Avid Ultimates.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by T 3
    but disc brakes (being more complicated and heavier ),seem out of character for SS use
    Your assumption is pretty inaccurate.

    Discs are heavier but are much less complicated. MUCH.
    I'm no mechanic...as a result.. i couldn't come close to setting up V-brakes.. but Avid Discs? Bring em on... I have 6 pairs of them.

    I suggest trying them out then making a decision...

  22. #22
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    I have a SS built up mainly for use as a winter / spring sloppy conditions bike. Unfortunately it has rim brakes in the back, and the rear brake pads last for about 3 rides this time of year. I'd love to obtain a SS frame that has rear disc mounts, as it would allow me to cut down on maintenance big time, not to mention I'd have some actual braking power too. IMO, rim brakes suck when it is wet and nasty, period. Also once you get them (discs) set up properly, they work consistently and are basically maintenance free. However, if Vee brakes is what you have and it will get you on the trail - thats cool too. They do work, just not as well.

    Note: I said I use it mainly for winter / spring slop conditions, but I am having more fun on it this year than previously. Maybe I am just starting to 'grow into' riding a SS a bit more. The low maintenance / smooth drivetrain / cheap drivetrain is a big part of the appeal for me anyways.

  23. #23
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    Actually, I totally disagree. I had a pair of Avid Mechanicals and I hated them. I'd think they were dialed in, but after one ride, I need to readjust. I sold them and got the cheapest of Avid rim brakes I could find.

    (P.S. I live in AZ, so there is very little need for me to go Disc anyway, IMO.)

  24. #24
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    True singlespeeding

    If riding a SS was all about simplicity then every true singlespeeder would be riding a rigid fixed gear. Oh wait, some of us are. Then you can feel the purity of pain. BTW if you thought v-brakes are hard, try setting up cheap chinese cantilever brakes with no tension adjustment (mid-nineties Schwinn Frontiers) with plastic spring covers for a living.

  25. #25
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    Disc rule - period!

    I think if you did a survey of both I would have to believe that disc would come out front in rider preference. Those of us that are serious riders, weigh more than 150 and ride in mud and all kinds of conditions the simplicity of disc brakes is a requirement.

    Burdiman, since you are not a serious rider, then I doubt if you would even notice the difference between v's or disc, so don't waste your money..

    SS Slave

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSlave
    Disc rule - period! I think if you did a survey of both I would have to believe that disc would come out front in rider preference. Those of us that are serious riders, weigh more than 150 and ride in mud and all kinds of conditions the simplicity of disc brakes is a requirement.Burdiman, since you are not a serious rider, then I doubt if you would even notice the difference between v's or disc, so don't waste your money.. SS Slave
    Well said. Even if you live in perfectley temperate and dry conditions.. v's just plain suck on the downhills. My wife hardly notices when I switch saddles or forks on her bike. But mess with her brakes? No way. She won't stand for it. She almost refuses to rid a bike w/ the dreaded v's. Why? Brake FADE. Those little tiny rubber pads get hot and stop working!
    This isn't even mentioning the fact that the v's slowly destroy wheels.

    I will conceed the fact that v's wills stop a bike.....eventually.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSlave
    Those of us that are serious riders, weigh more than 150 and ride in mud and all kinds of conditions the simplicity of disc brakes is a requirement.


    SS Slave
    Scary generalization there...

    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSlave
    Burdiman, since you are not a serious rider, then I doubt if you would even notice the difference between v's or disc, so don't waste your money..
    SS Slave
    i didn't know you had to be a serious rider to have disc brakes.. all the XC expert racers, including myself must not be serious... not to mention the semipro's/pro's..

  28. #28
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    Hhmmm, what does being a serious rider have to do with running "superior" equipment? Pretty weak generalization if you ask me.

    (P.S. I'm a serious rider with serious skills, and I still didn't like running disc. But that was my preference. Others might have different opinions. But to say if you don't have disc than your not serious is like saying if you don't have a rear shock and gears, you're not a true mt biker.)

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    SingleSpeedSlave

    I am sure you are right SingleSpeedSlave, as a former Cat II roadie and certified mechanic (UBI) with over 3 years shop experience, I am hardly qualified to comment on disc brakes.

    If you can't set up a set of Vees you have no business changing out your own chain.

    Serious mt bikers train on the road and kick ars on the trails.

    Thanks for comin' out.

    burdi

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    I'm no mechanic...as a result.. i couldn't come close to setting up V-brakes.. but Avid Discs? Bring em on... I have 6 pairs of them.
    Man, it's lucky cantilevers are long gone, then. I think Vees are simple and easy --well Avid vees. That said, I agree: Avid mech discs are super easy to setup, dial in and repair if necessary. I was really impressed when I installed my wife's set.

  31. #31
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    A few comments to tidy things up a bit:

    mtb biker - I realize that most of the pros or expert racers run v's, that why I said that disc's are superior for those of us who weigh more than 150lbs who need a bit more stopping power. Maybe the guys over 150 use them too, I dunno why.I was never able to get power that even when I had a certified mechanic (UBI) with over 3 years shop experience adjusting them for me. Somehow he could never meet me at the trail to scrap the mud off that completely rendered the adjustment useless!

    birdman - you are entitled to your opinion on v's versus disc, but your snide comment about those of us that prefer disc was sort of immature IMO and I looked at your other posts and noticed you've said the same thing before. Maybe you were kidding, I could'nt tell and I stand corrected if you were..

    SS Slave

  32. #32
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    Whoa there purtyman

    Quote Originally Posted by burdiman
    I am sure you are right SingleSpeedSlave, as a former Cat II roadie and certified mechanic (UBI) with over 3 years shop experience, I am hardly qualified to comment on disc brakes.
    Oooh, 3 years of experience "setting up cheap chinese cantilever brakes with no tension adjustment", that does make you an expert. And BTW, did you get a bachelors or a masters from UBI? <br>

    Quote Originally Posted by burdiman
    If you can't set up a set of Vees you have no business changing out your own chain.
    V brakes suck. They wear out the rims, have crap for power compared with discs, suck when wet and <b><i>are</b></i> hard to adjust compared to discs. I can do it, but I don't have to like it.

    I don't have the book lernin' you do, but I had a set of discs when you were in 8th grade, before either of your long-lived careers in professional road racing or professional bicycle maintenance.<br>

    Quote Originally Posted by burdiman
    Serious mt bikers train on the road and kick ars on the trails.
    Serious mountain bikers are cool to each other and act like grown ups, even if they aren't yet old enough to drink their Old Milwaukee in the brick bar down the street.<br>

    Quote Originally Posted by burdiman
    Thanks for comin' out.
    Can't say the same to you burdibrain. Sorry. My guess is that you can't afford a set of discs, and you're pissed about it.<br>

  33. #33
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    bitterpill

    i don't know why you are so pissed or lack a sense of humor but that is your deal

    oh masters by the way.

  34. #34
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    uh

    just being funny you bitter ahole. thank goodness those of us who also ride the road don't have to deal with u. oh yeah no disc brakes on the road bikes.....

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    SingleSpeedSlave

    most people here have a sense of humor and i tend to poke jabs at those who are so involved in weighing every option and debating everything about their set-up. go ride your bike and stop being such babies about it. brakes are brakes. can you stop? then you are fine.

    i don't attack people personally like SingleSpeedSlave.

    sorry if my shop experience threatens you but most of you diss parts that you probably installed and maintained improperly.

  36. #36
    T 3
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    Riding Conditions

    To answer your question: The places that are most convenient for me to ride are mostly flat with tight twisting turns on hardpack that often has a slippery top surface.Some steeper hills and dirt surfaces can be reached in an hour,I don't often ride in sloppy conditions.Stopping power has never been a problem


    Quote Originally Posted by the Inbred
    you'll quickly drift out of that zone when, after taking a digger, your rotor rubs and the sound is magnified through your frame. by the way, what kind of conditions do you ride in? as mentioned above, sloppy conditions would be better off with discs. if i ever upgrade the Avid Mechs on my Imperial, i will go with Hope Minis. the only upgrade on my SS will be to Avid Ultimates.
    "There's a fine line between clever and stupid."
    -David St. Hubbins, Spinal Tap

  37. #37
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    I dig the rollamajig!

    Cool! I never thought of using a roll-a-ma-jig on the rear brake. That thing holds up under brake pressure, right? I guess it must if you're using it.

    Yeah, I gotta chime in on the disc brake simplicity issue. I used to futz with my brakes all the time. Pad alignment, spacing, brake spring adjustments, etc. I occasionally click the little red knobs omne or two clicks on my Avid Mechanicals to remove excess slop or drag. Every now and again I have to take the crescent wrench to the rotor when I accidently lean something against it. So far, I got around 500 miles on my front brake on the original pads, and I weigh almost 200# and ride steep hills. I got around 400 miles on my old Deore Mechanical disc before upgrading to the Avid. Still, the pads look pretty good.

  38. #38
    2:1
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    Just ride your freakin' bikes- v-brake or disc- and ease up on Barnett's vs UBI, how long you tooled shitty bikes back before discs were neither reliable nor commonplace (way back when V's were amazingly powerful), and how "superior" your set-up is.
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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingleSpeedSlave
    . Those of us that are serious riders, weigh more than 150 and ride in mud and all kinds of conditions the simplicity of disc brakes is a requirement.
    ha.

    ha.

    Quote Originally Posted by discodave
    If riding a SS was all about simplicity then every true singlespeeder would be riding a rigid fixed gear. Oh wait, some of us are. Then you can feel the purity of pain. BTW if you thought v-brakes are hard, try setting up cheap chinese cantilever brakes with no tension adjustment (mid-nineties Schwinn Frontiers) with plastic spring covers for a living.
    hey, i have some of those...well, i have a Schwinn Fontier with cantis, at least. i'm gonna tinker with them since you said that. i've never experienced cantis. this should be fun.

    T 3 - i, personally, don't think you need discs. but, eh, that's just me.

    my Inbred: i have Avid 1.9 levers and SRAM 5.0 calipers. i adjust them once ever 5 or 10 rides, whether it be the spring tension, toe-in, whatever. conditions i ride in are dry with some creek crossings, generally little climbing/descending (it's central texas climbing, not colorado climbing). shop set-up.

    my Imperial: i have SD7 levers and 185 Avid Mechs. when i first got them, i had hell with getting the rotors trued. i swear i was tooling with the rotors after every ride. i can now finally ride without rubbing. adjustment is simple, just turn the knobs. it's a street/play bike, so that's generally dry riding. shop set-up.

    my Zebdi: i have Avid SD7 levers and SD7 calipers. only been on them a week, so i haven't had to adjust anything, but they feel pretty damn good. this was the first experience i had with installing brakes (also used Flak Jacket housing). setting them up was easier than i though, and all i had to use was Avid's instructions. if you spend time looking at set-ups, doing it yourself seems fairly easy (for cable brakes, at least).

    and this was all just my opinion.

  40. #40
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    heh I just did my cantis

    I got my singlespeed on the stand, building her up.

    I forgot what a PITA Cantis are. You haven't lived until you've wrestled with a set of those mofos. I forgot how bad we had it before Vees.

  41. #41
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    Thanks Burdiman, for the clarification, you were just being a smart ass. No problem..hope that does not count as a personal attack after you called me a bitter ahole.

    No discs on road bikes? Really? I never knew that!

    SS Slave
    Last edited by SingleSpeedSlave; 03-04-2004 at 07:13 AM. Reason: no reason

  42. #42
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    yup

    ahhhh! i love it!! that's just how i feel, be a man use Vs. technology sucks!



    Quote Originally Posted by burdiman
    because i don't ride in the mud and they just work. if you are a soft handed technophile that can barely hold a glass of water without dropping it then go for discs.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by discodave
    If riding a SS was all about simplicity then every true singlespeeder would be riding a rigid fixed gear. Oh wait, some of us are.....
    I ride my Fixie offroad mtb with a front disc & no rear brake - so dose that make me an anachronism?

    I use to replace rims every year & a half, haven't had to since switching to discs. Less maintenance is good.

  44. #44
    Ebo
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    Nice post.....now who's looking like a tool?

  45. #45
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    old school--old school--old school

    My very old singlespeed--92 YETI Pro Fro has canti's on it...rigid fork and I love it. For some of us, building up what is laying around is the best way. Disks are nice and work in every condition but who has the extra 700-1200 dollars for a custom single speed when you already have a room filled with 2K plus bikes......Mine SS is the 4th bike in the rack.

    Just a poor man's thought.....
    Proud Tribe member since 1992 - looking for better singletrack to be ridden year round

  46. #46
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    Good job! more thoughts....

    Folks,

    Further thoughts ....take 'em with with a grain....I'm no mechanic...just into enjoying SS'ing

    If I drop alot of cash on a nice set of wheels, I don't feel good about the rim walls wearing down with rim brakes. Nor would I feel happy with replacement and/or potiential future hazard if/when the rim walls cave.

    It's kinda nice that if your rims a out of true, braking is not affected with discs.

    Recent hydraulic brakes seem to offer alot of reliability. Mineral oil based disc brakes are claiming they won't absorb moisture thus lessening fluid replacement intervals. Maintenance to brakes is further reduced.

    Building up bikes as a kid, out of broken thrown-away bikes in the 70's (singlespeeds)makes me fully appreciate nice "set-and-forget" components offered today. This is probably why disc's are attracting my attention.

    If you happen to have good experience and performance with V brakes .. I say why not use 'em.

    I personally like the idea of hydraulic's and I will post the picture of my new 04 Kona Unit this spring once I get the wheels and hydraulic brakes to complete the bike.

    I like and agree with the previous post from Devlin that states that simplifying the bike adds to the overall enjoyment of riding. Maintaining a "flow" from start to finish.....cool ...what SS'ing is all about....

    "life is short.....enjoy the ride"

  47. #47
    Retro Grouch
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well That's just wrong...

    Quote Originally Posted by 2:1
    Just ride your freakin' bikes- v-brake or disc- and ease up on Barnett's vs UBI, how long you tooled shitty bikes back before discs were neither reliable nor commonplace (way back when V's were amazingly powerful), and how "superior" your set-up is.
    Your point is well taken but the vehicle (poster) shows a true lack of empathy or understanding of true courage. Having participated in the Law Enforcement Special Olympics torch run for the last 13 years and having a special needs child myself I can only tell you that any feat I have accomplished on my bike pales in significance to what these kids must face every day of their lives. What your poster seems to completely miss is "winning" is an idiots sport, these kids just want to be part of something bigger than themselves and have fun; they can teach us all something.

    1G1G, Brad
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    Last edited by aka brad; 03-04-2004 at 11:20 AM.

  48. #48
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    aka brad,
    i agree.

    dirt diggler

  49. #49
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    Ditto..........

  50. #50
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    You could make the same argument re:

    Quote Originally Posted by T 3
    One of the things that really surprised me was seeing several SS bikes with disc brakes.Obviously I'm still in the learning stage on SS,but disc brakes (being more complicated and heavier ),seem out of character for SS use.I'm using V-Brakes on my FS and HT and don't think much of disc anyway and was surprised to see them much on SS.
    suspension forks vs. rigid (and many have). But SSing isn't just about simplification or retro or lightweight, it's largely about the fun of running one and only one gear, period. That's the main appeal for me, not what is or isn't clapped on around the one gear, and disc brakes or sussy forks don't take away from that fun (although I prefer a rigid fork). Different strokes, etc. I don't think you define an SS by how much technology does or doesn't hang off the frame.

    So, what are you waiting for? Leap, man, leap!
    "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailleur? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!'' -- Henri Desgrange, from an article in L'Equipe

    Wrench In the Gears

  51. #51
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    Is this thread really happening - DISCS RULE

    All else being equal - rider, bike, tires, trail, etc. - disc brakes beat v-brakes 100% of the time putting aside for purposes of this discussion the obvious issues of personal budget and frame options which are wholly independent of a disc versus V-brake pro/con discussion.

    Discs are:
    1. More fade resistant,
    2. Better performing in inclimate conditions,
    3. Bend your wheel, brakes still work,
    4. Set and forget - at least with hydros
    5. More in line with the "SS aesthete" - clean lines, simplicity, etc. - if nothing else.

    Vs are:
    1. Common and inexpensive - although Avid mechs aren't meaningfully more pricey than high end Vs,
    2. Prone to fade on long, braking intensive descents,
    3. Good performers in arid conditions,
    4. Crappy performers in wet, muddy, gritty conditions,
    5. In frequent need of adjustment,
    6. Collecting dust, one pair at a time, under my workbench...

    Discs are easy to set up, especially the Avid mechanical variety. Hydros are easy too assuming they've been properly bled out of the box - as both pairs of Hopes (Mini and M4) and one pair of Hayes that I've worked with were.

    Why are hydro discs used vs. the alternatives on cars, motorcycles, etc.? Because they are superior, period. Same applies to bicycles.

    Sean
    Professional Amateur

  52. #52
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    Discs are great unless...

    you bend your axle....then they totally suck! I bent an axle on the front wheel a few rides back, had to take the caliper off to keep riding. V's would have still worked with some adjustment. Rotor got bent when this happened, 3rd rotor I've bent in a year. At this point I can only "love" discs during wet rides with long decents. Under normal riding conditions V's are just fine.

    I actually prefer Disc front, V rear. The rear brake adds so little to your actual stopping power. Running V's in the back allows you to have 2 ratios on the bike at all times if your hub has threads on both sides.

    my .02c

    MC




    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    All else being equal - rider, bike, tires, trail, etc. - disc brakes beat v-brakes 100% of the time putting aside for purposes of this discussion the obvious issues of personal budget and frame options which are wholly independent of a disc versus V-brake pro/con discussion.

    Discs are:
    1. More fade resistant,
    2. Better performing in inclimate conditions,
    3. Bend your wheel, brakes still work,
    4. Set and forget - at least with hydros
    5. More in line with the "SS aesthete" - clean lines, simplicity, etc. - if nothing else.

    Vs are:
    1. Common and inexpensive - although Avid mechs aren't meaningfully more pricey than high end Vs,
    2. Prone to fade on long, braking intensive descents,
    3. Good performers in arid conditions,
    4. Crappy performers in wet, muddy, gritty conditions,
    5. In frequent need of adjustment,
    6. Collecting dust, one pair at a time, under my workbench...

    Discs are easy to set up, especially the Avid mechanical variety. Hydros are easy too assuming they've been properly bled out of the box - as both pairs of Hopes (Mini and M4) and one pair of Hayes that I've worked with were.

    Why are hydro discs used vs. the alternatives on cars, motorcycles, etc.? Because they are superior, period. Same applies to bicycles.

    Sean

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