Brake lever reach on Midge bars- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Sofa King We Todd Did
    Reputation: SpinWheelz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,262

    Brake lever reach on Midge bars

    Maybe I have short stubby fingers. In fact, that's a distinct possibility. But what the heck.

    I've been riding my Midge bars with Dia-Compe 287V brake levers. Thing is, the levers are just a bit out of reach from where my hand sits in the drops. I've got my hands in the forward position of those drops and even there, I can't rest on my palms and pull on the brakes. I need to actually lift my hand ever so slightly to reach the levers, then pull.

    Does this happen to anyone else or is it just me? Sliding the brake levers up and down on the bar doesn't seem to improve the reach that much. Is there a trick to this, or do I just suck it up and ride like I've been riding?

    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    It is not the bar. The levers are big.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
    Sofa King We Todd Did
    Reputation: SpinWheelz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,262
    Nah, I didn't think it was the bar at all. I'm quite happy with the Midge, although my only wish would be if the straight, flared sections in the drops were a bit longer.

    When you say the levers are big, are you saying the the 287V levers have a greater reach than other road brake levers? I have no experience with other road brake levers so I have no idea. One idea I've been toying around with was putting 700c wheels on my bike with road brake, and give road brake levers like the Tektro R200A levers a go.

  4. #4
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    Yes, the 287 lever has a bit more reach than many road levers
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  5. #5
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
    Reputation: Drevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,906
    I don't know if you've already tried this, but I set the pads on my Avid mechanical disc brakes further apart than if I had regular (straight bar) levers. That way when I'm riding through rocky stuff or going downhill, my fingers will always be on the 287V levers (pulled halfway in) without the brakes being engaged.

    My wife's Ultegra brifters had wedge shims that you could place behind the lever (at the top) to bring it closer to the bar. I was trying to figure out a way to do something similar to my 287Vs (either shims or tap a hole for an adjustment screw). Doesn't seem too hard, but I've been lazy.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  6. #6
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    Quote Originally Posted by Drevil
    I don't know if you've already tried this, but I set the pads on my Avid mechanical disc brakes further apart than if I had regular (straight bar) levers. That way when I'm riding through rocky stuff or going downhill, my fingers will always be on the 287V levers (pulled halfway in) without the brakes being engaged...
    That is what I do. I have always have the engagement point of my brakes close to the bar. Much better control.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  7. #7
    Sofa King We Todd Did
    Reputation: SpinWheelz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,262
    Do you boys actually *like* having some 'pre-squeeze' action to your brake levers, or are you really simply conpensating for a shortfall in the design/ergonomics? I like feeling some braking power from the moment I apply any pressure to the levers. The argument could be made counter to that, to allow for any inadvertant action on the levers so that you don't have brake by accident.

  8. #8
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
    Reputation: Drevil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,906
    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    Do you boys actually *like* having some 'pre-squeeze' action to your brake levers, or are you really simply conpensating for a shortfall in the design/ergonomics?
    Maybe a little of both. I do the same thing to my flat bar levers, and it's what I'm used to. By setting the levers to engage when closer to the bar, you are also allowing the pads to open wider and thus have more mud/rim/rotor clearance. As long as I can lock up the wheels about 3/4 of the lever's travel, they're fine for me.
    "Keep your burgers lean and your tires fat." -h.d. | ssoft | flickr

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236
    Quote Originally Posted by SpinWheelz
    Do you boys actually *like* having some 'pre-squeeze' action to your brake levers, or are you really simply conpensating for a shortfall in the design/ergonomics? I like feeling some braking power from the moment I apply any pressure to the levers. The argument could be made counter to that, to allow for any inadvertant action on the levers so that you don't have brake by accident.
    Yes.
    I hate having the brakes grabbing the moment I touch the lever. Hard to control. Hard to hold onto the bar. More tiring on long descents. No modulation. Basically an ON/OFF switch.

    No thanks.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  10. #10
    Cubicle Fugitive
    Reputation: czardonic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    162

    Reach solutions.

    First, though you should obviously set up your brakes the way you want them, there are solid arguments for having the pads hit the rim later in the lever's pull. Many find it easier to modulate, and the closer to the bar the lever is the better you are able to get a good grip when you really need to lock things up (gripping with a closed hand vs. gripping a large object). But, different strokes. . .

    Rivendell covered this topic in the latest newsletter and showed how you can try sticking a large paperclip (or some other suitable object) into the top of the blade so that it prevents the blade from swinging all the way out. This effectively shortens the reach. Or, Rivendell carries the shorter reach version of the new Cane Creek lever (http://www.rivbike.com/webalog/brakes/15123.html), though you'd need to use Travel Agents or switch to Cantis.

Similar Threads

  1. On-One Midge bars = rad. [x-post 29" juggernaut forum]
    By flexiflyer in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-10-2013, 10:43 PM
  2. On-One Midge bars = rad. [x-post SS/low-RPM forum]
    By flexiflyer in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-05-2005, 11:11 AM
  3. Jones H-Bar brake lever Poll (SS crosspost)
    By Endomaniac in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-28-2004, 08:14 AM
  4. Which brake lever for which brake...?
    By mahgnillig in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-06-2004, 02:18 PM
  5. Hayes HFX9 rear brake lever not returning
    By adamp in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-15-2004, 04:42 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.