brake adjustment trouble with eccentric hub- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    viva la v-brakes!
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    brake adjustment trouble with eccentric hub

    I recently got a White Industries Eric's Eccentric Hub. I've got vertical dropouts, but I've been pretty lucky that a 34x19 fits pretty much perfectly, with just a little slack, on my Barracuda. But I wanted to try some other gearing so I could use the bike around town and such and thus the eccentric hub.

    I was pretty surprised to find that the hub moved my wheel up about 1/2 an inch. This put the rim at there very limit of my beloved canti brakes reach and now the rear brakes don't work worth ****. Are there any solutions to this problem. Can I take or add a whole link to the chain, or is that more then these hubs can adjust for?

    Also, I'm really starting to wonder what good a flip flop hub is. A different cog (I was thinking 15t for around town) will totally adjust where the wheel fits in the frame and thus screw up the brake alignment to the rim. It seems like this must also be an issue for horizontal drop-outs. Am I missing something, or maybe do people use cogs that are only 1 or 2 teeth different?
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  2. #2
    drev-il, not Dr. Evil!
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    I recently got a White Industries Eric's Eccentric Hub. I've got vertical dropouts, but I've been pretty lucky that a 34x19 fits pretty much perfectly, with just a little slack, on my Barracuda. But I wanted to try some other gearing so I could use the bike around town and such and thus the eccentric hub.

    I was pretty surprised to find that the hub moved my wheel up about 1/2 an inch. This put the rim at there very limit of my beloved canti brakes reach and now the rear brakes don't work worth ****. Are there any solutions to this problem. Can I take or add a whole link to the chain, or is that more then these hubs can adjust for?

    Also, I'm really starting to wonder what good a flip flop hub is. A different cog (I was thinking 15t for around town) will totally adjust where the wheel fits in the frame and thus screw up the brake alignment to the rim. It seems like this must also be an issue for horizontal drop-outs. Am I missing something, or maybe do people use cogs that are only 1 or 2 teeth different?
    Instead of moving the wheel up, try moving it down. See if the brake pads still hit the rim squarely. If they do, the arms will have more leverage and the brakes should work.

    When I put cogs on a flip flop wheel, it's usually a difference of two teeth, but it's usually fixed and free -- the freewheel having more teeth.
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  3. #3
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    Dont talk ill of the eccentric hub!

    Niiiice eccentric hub.
    Gooood eccentric hub.

    Now you tell eccentric hub you are sorry.

    The eccentric hub rules!

  4. #4
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    Adjusting the ENO does change where the brakes will hit the rim. Small changes don't require me to adjust my brakes (avid sd7 and Velocity Aeroheat rims) but changes of more than a coupe teeth WILL require some messing about.

    I haven't noticed any change in braking performance based on the adjusting I've needed to do.

    I don't ride fixed (I'm only human!) so I can't help you there.

    Good Luck,

    Joe



    Quote Originally Posted by FishMan473
    I recently got a White Industries Eric's Eccentric Hub. I've got vertical dropouts, but I've been pretty lucky that a 34x19 fits pretty much perfectly, with just a little slack, on my Barracuda. But I wanted to try some other gearing so I could use the bike around town and such and thus the eccentric hub.

    I was pretty surprised to find that the hub moved my wheel up about 1/2 an inch. This put the rim at there very limit of my beloved canti brakes reach and now the rear brakes don't work worth ****. Are there any solutions to this problem. Can I take or add a whole link to the chain, or is that more then these hubs can adjust for?

    Also, I'm really starting to wonder what good a flip flop hub is. A different cog (I was thinking 15t for around town) will totally adjust where the wheel fits in the frame and thus screw up the brake alignment to the rim. It seems like this must also be an issue for horizontal drop-outs. Am I missing something, or maybe do people use cogs that are only 1 or 2 teeth different?

  5. #5
    JoB
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    I had a similar problem with my ENO eccentric.

    At the 'high' point the rear tyre was worryingly close to the seatstay arch (Trek STP) so there was no mud clearance at all, and at the 'low' point the brakes couldn't adjust down enough to hit the rim.

    And the bearings didn't last many U.K. winter rides (a standard American bearings trait).


    Found that the STP worked perfectly on a standard hub and a 'Magic Gear' of 34/17, so I ditched the ENO.


    (Whooo, first post )

  6. #6
    Medium?
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    Sounds like you want to try a half-link. Spicer for 3/32 derailleur chain, or any bmx shop for 1/8" chain. All hail the eccentric hub!

    Besides, you should get a cog and ditch your brakes.

  7. #7
    No Justice = No Peace
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    Ditto

    What everyone said. The good folks at White Industries told me to expect decent alignment with a two tooth change, then start fiddling. I haven't played around with the fixed side yet, but I am assuming that I will have to abandon my rear brake to ride fixed. (Just leave the cable off and the brake arms open) that seems okay, since you can do some braking with your feet, and you still have the front brake, which gives you the most braking power anyway.
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