Bike Porn - New IF Steel Deluxe- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 37 of 37
  1. #1
    but Diggin the 1 x 14 too
    Reputation: 2gears=1speed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    133

    Bike Porn - New IF Steel Deluxe

    ...if anyone is interested in seeing an IF Steel Deluxe - been riding it for about a month now - about 300 miles on it - giving it high marks - feels very strong, very solid AND compliant ...this is my first "adult" SS bike and first hardtail in 10 years - first rigid fork in 13 years... wow - i think i am reborn! ...although on some of the climbs i think i am dying
    ...running a 32/20 to start out with... will go up to a 32/18 when i feel ready.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 2gears=1speed; 11-07-2004 at 12:19 PM.

  2. #2
    mmmm beer
    Reputation: clarkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    94
    wow that is one WILD paint job. nice bike!! I've wanted one of those for years....

  3. #3
    DSR
    DSR is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,056
    Good goodness! What did that paint job run you? Wild! S

  4. #4
    but Diggin the 1 x 14 too
    Reputation: 2gears=1speed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    133

    bike paint

    Quote Originally Posted by DSR
    Good goodness! What did that paint job run you? Wild! S
    ...a friend that paints guitars for me did it - it is one of his 3 Color SWIRLS (he can do 4 or 5 colors too) ....paint was around 400.00
    IF agreed to make and sell me the frame in white Primer ONLY! (sadly, they do not discount the frames if you do NOT want em painted )
    hope this helps.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Jed Peters
    Reputation: Zonic Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,404
    Dude, who fit you for that thing?

  6. #6
    34N 118W
    Reputation: Hollywood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,246

    finally! ;)

    good to see pics up. And glad you're diggin' it

    (the bike looks great in person too)

    HW

  7. #7
    but Diggin the 1 x 14 too
    Reputation: 2gears=1speed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    133
    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    Dude, who fit you for that thing?
    ...frame is IF custom dimensions based on MY skeletal dimensions - also still adjusting the stem up and down to taste if that is what your question is in reference too?

  8. #8
    Your bike sucks
    Reputation: Carl Mega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,611
    That's the absolute wildest paint scheme I've ever seen. Nice.

    I'm sure Zonic is talking about the super long seat post and the 2'' of spacers below the stem. To each their own but I like my bikes with no more that 10mm of spacers and a bit less post showing. Whatever works for you though. Enjoy it. It's a beautiful frame with a stylin paint job.

  9. #9
    Jed Peters
    Reputation: Zonic Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,404
    Quote Originally Posted by 2gears=1speed
    ...frame is IF custom dimensions based on MY skeletal dimensions - also still adjusting the stem up and down to taste if that is what your question is in reference too?
    Possibly the "too long" seatpost and the fact that you have 50 million spacers under that stem.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1
    OK, it must just be me then. Or maybe it looks different in the flesh. I'm practically weeping about how you made a beatiful frame so damn ugly man!

  11. #11
    theHeadlessThompsonGunner
    Reputation: SDizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,131
    Quote Originally Posted by Zonic Man
    Possibly the "too long" seatpost and the fact that you have 50 million spacers under that stem.
    More seat post = lower top tube. Lots of folks seems to think that makes sense, and I'm one of them. I've been playing with designs lately, and have gotten a really low standover on a 29er with a Thompson 410 as a design element, rather than just an afterthought. You have to be careful with seat tube angles, or you can end up WAY over the real wheel (or too far forward).

    That said, and despite how purdy the frame is (a little too "busy" for my tastes!), some of it does look a little convoluted...
    "I've courted brain damage like some courtesan of darkness."


    -The Good Doctor

  12. #12
    Trail rider and racer
    Reputation: Trevor!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,691
    Holy Crap Batman! How many spacers have you got running there? It's not the best setup for a mountain bike - even if it's an IF.

    Considering its a custom I suspect somebody erred in measuring you for the bike or I am missing something.
    Trev!

  13. #13
    Your bike sucks
    Reputation: Carl Mega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,611
    Beware!!



    A person whose first post is to bash someone's ride.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    129
    wicked pretty frame and paint - cant help but have "goin up to the spirit in the sky" runnin through my head when i saw tha pics. the seat post scare's me, but i'm a fat guy.

    thumbs up.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,841
    Quote Originally Posted by SDizzle
    You have to be careful with seat tube angles, or you can end up WAY over the real wheel (or too far forward).
    I keep reading that - not just here, but on several other forums.

    I'm always a bit puzzled.

    A 73deg seat angle, is a 73deg seat angle, no matter how much seatpost you run. You end up in the same position relative to the rear wheel even if you're running a huge frame with a tiny post, or small frame with a broomhandle for a post.

    All that matters is seat angle, distance of the seat from the BB centre, and the chainstay length. Nothing else.

    Unless of course you're factoring in "post flex" as a design element too, but then I'm not sure how you'd end up "too far forward".

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Treybiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,041
    What he was refering to is how seat post angle can affect the riders position over the bottom bracket when the seatpost is raised extremly high. Since the seatpost angle is pointed back ( \ ) and not straight up ( I ), the further the seatpost is raised the further back the rider will sit as well.

    And that is a pretty funky paint job is that "acid dropping" kind of way. And he has more spacers UNDER the stem than I have on all 5 of my bikes combined!!!

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: brant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,841
    Quote Originally Posted by Treybiker
    What he was refering to is how seat post angle can affect the riders position over the bottom bracket when the seatpost is raised extremly high.
    Yes of course, but the length of seatpost hanging out of the frame has no bearing on this at all. It's just a function of saddle height, seat angle and chainstay length.

    Example:-

    I had a customer who bought a 20in frame, instead of an 18in one.
    He later was concerned that the frame he bought was too big.
    I asked him why he'd bought a 20in as he was only 5'10".
    He said it was because he didn't want to be "as far over the back tyre".

    Seeing as all our frames (rightly or wrongly) have the same 73 deg seat angle, and same 16.75in chainstay length (currently), it makes no difference to his position whether he's on a 14in frame with a 500mm post, or a 20in frame with a 200mm post. Or whatever. His butt is in the same position relative to the rear wheel.

    I can see an argument where if you're concerned about butt-to-rear-wheel geometry that a larger frame should have a steeper seat angle than a smaller frame, to put the riders butt in the same position (relatively), but in practice, I think a 73deg seat angle and a saddle that moves back and forth an inch and a bit is a good compromise for most people.

    Me myself - I'm having particular fun riding a sliding dropout frame I have with the wheel ALL THE WAY BACK in the dropouts, giving a longer wheelbase. This keeps the weight on the front wheel more, resulting in more positive direction changes on steep climbs with long travel forks.

    However, this "better climbing with longer chainstays" isn't something that sits well with my attuned "shorter chainstays are better for climbing" mentality - I remember thinking "if it's 17in, it's too long" in the past. But them all those wacky hill climb motorcycles seem to have quite long back ends on them, so who's right and who's wrong?

    Personally I think that wider, more aggressive tyres, fitted into longer chainstays with lots of mud clearance, give more benefits than a smaller, less knobby tyre, with shorter chainstays. But anyhow I'm rambling.

    To keep on message - NICE PAINT!!! How does he do that?

  18. #18
    Recovering couch patato
    Reputation: Cloxxki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,017
    About climbing and chainstay length, I think it's whatever you need, traction on slippery moderate slopes, or on high-grip steep stuff.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  19. #19
    theHeadlessThompsonGunner
    Reputation: SDizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,131
    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    All that matters is seat angle, distance of the seat from the BB centre, and the chainstay length. Nothing else.
    I guess that's what I failed to say - if the frame was designed around a lower/higher saddle height, then the seattube angle could make fore/aft saddle adjustments significantly more drastic. ie, a 69 seat tube, designed around a 500 mm saddle height, is going to move the rider way back at 600 mm; vise versa for a 74 tube at varying heights. (While it'll never move the rider "forward" per se, some fore/aft change is expected when posts are adjusted, and one could end up with a "forward" feeling riding position when he expected to sit further back.)

    I move my saddle around kind of a lot - not for efficiency, obviously, but for descents and whatnot - and taking only the efficient pedalling position into account would yeild some pretty funky positions when it's at any other height. I don't know what the plan was for the above bike, or how any of this was taken into account. Maybe he's a funny shaped guy, and IF knew it and we don't!

    Late editions: What the hell is "Lin"? And how did I "mention it in this post"? And...the paint, oil based, is floated on top of water, marbled as desired, and the frame (or what have you) is dipped. At least, that's the theory - it's probably a whole different thing in practice...
    Last edited by SDizzle; 11-08-2004 at 06:34 AM.
    "I've courted brain damage like some courtesan of darkness."


    -The Good Doctor

  20. #20
    "Mr. Britannica"
    Reputation: roadiegonebad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,818
    shagadelic, ba-by! are you not gonna put if decals on the dt?

  21. #21
    get down!
    Reputation: appleSSeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,187
    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor!
    Holy Crap Batman! How many spacers have you got running there? It's not the best setup for a mountain bike - even if it's an IF.
    .
    c'mon now Trevor, you of all people. Post a picture of your TCR that had everyone in shambles in the weight weenie forum for all your spacers.

    whatever works for someone is what works for someone you know

    oh and Zonic Man is officially the styleman of mtbr...your posts crack me up

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: admin@ifrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    17

    Stunning

    Hotdiggity damn

    That's one fine looking machine. It'd be great to get it registered on the Independent Fabrication Owners' Club website.

    Take a look: www.ifrider.com

    (Update going out tonight (that'll be afternoon for most of you in the US

  23. #23
    Kill your... television
    Reputation: motoman711's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    924

    Those colors remind me of Van Halen 1984

    Super cool ride man. Super funky. If it fits then ride it. That is what I say.

  24. #24
    34N 118W
    Reputation: Hollywood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,246

    a trend of poor fit

    judging by the IF Rider galleries, they are really f-ing customers over with poorly fit frames. When will they learn when too much post and too many spacers is bad? We better all start emailing them and set them straight.

    https://www.ifrider.com/register/00001a.jpg

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D.F.L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,840

    Too much post?

    I respectfully disagree on the post issue.

    As long as the post has appropriate insertion, and the seat tube is designed for the additional loads, there's no real reason, other that STYLE, to run a longer seat tube/ less exposed post.

    YES, the post needs to be appropriately sized, to remove the springboard effect.

    Just because it doesn't jive with someone's fashion sense, doesn't mean there's anything wrong with it. There are reasons why more exposed post is a practical solution on some frames.

    I do agree that the head tube on that frame is too short, and this may illustrate some downsides to their measuring system.

    Steve (who loves his Thomson 410 post AND his acid-washed jeans.)

  26. #26
    Kill your... television
    Reputation: motoman711's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    924

    You guys are just jealous...

    You only wish your post was as long as his. :-P There is nothing wrong with showing some post... Seriously though, a longer seat post acts as suspension. The 410 mm Thomson is designed to handle stress at the length it is. Why not have a long seat post if you can? What is the benefit of having a high top tube instead? Sterility?

    Moto

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pimpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    40
    People always say: "Whaa, that are a lot of spacers!" My headtube is a bit short so I need them.


  28. #28
    Squalor
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,574

    Two Can Play This Game...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    judging by the IF Rider galleries, they are really f-ing customers over with poorly fit frames. When will they learn when too much post and too many spacers is bad? We better all start emailing them and set them straight.

    https://www.ifrider.com/register/00001a.jpg
    You pick your pictures...I'll pick mine

    <a href="https://ifrider.com/register/00025a.jpg">https://ifrider.com/register/00025a.jpg</a>

    <a href="https://ifrider.com/register/00081a.jpg">https://ifrider.com/register/00081a.jpg</a>

    I am pretty sure it is ultimately up to the customer -

    That said I have two IF's (29"er Deluxe and a Planet X) and I do think the headtubes are a little short on their "suggested" frame geos - Again all personal preference. If you want a longer headtube or seatube they will, of course, do it no problem.

    Me tinks HW may be doin' a little trollin' todays

    Lance

  29. #29
    34N 118W
    Reputation: Hollywood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,246

    ... and if we just ... who me?

    Quote Originally Posted by lanpope
    You pick your pictures...I'll pick mine Me tinks HW may be doin' a little trollin' todays

    Lance
    come on now, I would never lower myself to troll level. Unless it was a girl troll and she was hot.

  30. #30
    "Mr. Britannica"
    Reputation: roadiegonebad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,818
    Quote Originally Posted by D.F.L.
    I respectfully disagree on the post issue.

    As long as the post has appropriate insertion, and the seat tube is designed for the additional loads, there's no real reason, other that STYLE, to run a longer seat tube/ less exposed post.

    YES, the post needs to be appropriately sized, to remove the springboard effect.

    Just because it doesn't jive with someone's fashion sense, doesn't mean there's anything wrong with it. There are reasons why more exposed post is a practical solution on some frames.

    I do agree that the head tube on that frame is too short, and this may illustrate some downsides to their measuring system.

    Steve (who loves his Thomson 410 post AND his acid-washed jeans.)


    True. Dude could have short legs relative to his height, and need the low standover. As for the spacers, I suppose they could have lengthened the head tube and sloped the top tube more.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DaveX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    579
    Personally I like the way this one is set up.

    https://www.ifrider.com/register/00071a.jpg

    Oh wait, that's cause it's mine :-)

  32. #32
    Don't be a sheep
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,421

    That's how you make light frames.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    judging by the IF Rider galleries, they are really f-ing customers over with poorly fit frames. When will they learn when too much post and too many spacers is bad? We better all start emailing them and set them straight.

    https://www.ifrider.com/register/00001a.jpg
    Short headtubes and seat tubes, just ask Tony Ellsworth. But it makes for a funky looking and hard to setup bike. Seeing it more and more. Stem spacers, ughhhh.

  33. #33
    Trail rider and racer
    Reputation: Trevor!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,691
    Quote Originally Posted by appleSSeed
    c'mon now Trevor, you of all people. Post a picture of your TCR that had everyone in shambles in the weight weenie forum for all your spacers.
    Oh I agree - I have a ton of spacers on my roadie bike - and yeah people totally couldn't stand it, but it looks like this bike has a very large number of spacers both below and above the stem, which just does not seem right for any form of riding (Offroad or otherwise)
    Trev!

  34. #34
    Trail rider and racer
    Reputation: Trevor!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,691
    Quote Originally Posted by Rivet
    Short headtubes and seat tubes, just ask Tony Ellsworth. But it makes for a funky looking and hard to setup bike. Seeing it more and more. Stem spacers, ughhhh.
    With regards to Ellsworth, I am not too sure if his design is all about short headtubes and seatubes or whether or not its just the sizes he chooses to manufacture (Just a 15-18 and 20" bike) and thus people end up using long seatposts and spacer stacks to make the bike fit.

    I have an 18" Ellsworth and have to use a long seatpost but otherwise the bike is normal just like any other.
    Trev!

  35. #35
    Cracker-magnon
    Reputation: gpsser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood
    come on now, I would never lower myself to troll level. Unless it was a girl troll and she was hot.
    hot girl troll??? sounds scary to me.
    "Life is a [email protected]#^ing story problem, get used to it - my son.

  36. #36
    kung food
    Reputation: jace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    250
    I'm with steve. 13" seat tubes are for winners. (you're alone on the acid wash)


  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pimpy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    40
    yeah, but your fork is longer

Similar Threads

  1. Mountain bike jargon/ lingo
    By bstguitarist in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-26-2005, 12:02 PM
  2. Forks, Frames and Five Hundred Dollars.
    By AdamOn6thStreet in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 02-25-2005, 10:10 PM
  3. If you need to know this.
    By KevinVokeyJ24 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-24-2004, 09:40 AM
  4. An evolution of a bike. (bike porn!)
    By direktor in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 07-29-2004, 10:39 PM
  5. Finally wrote a review, Banzai bike porn! very long...
    By BanzaiRider in forum Canadian Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-11-2004, 07:58 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.